Digital Infrastructure: Storage and Content Management

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Discusses analogies between the rise of the electric power grid and the Internet. Describes storage capacity issues and requirements for digital repositories. Reviews different repository platforms specific to archival and digital collection management. Has a really cool picture of Burden's Wheel.

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Digital Infrastructure: Storage and Content Management

  1. 1. Digital Infrastructure From Storage to Content Management Systems By Noreen Whysel LIS 665: Projects in Digital Archives September 25, 2013
  2. 2. Burden’s Wheel Source: Carr, N. (2008). Burden’s Wheel. In Big Switch: Rewiring the World, From Edison to Google (pp. 9- 24). New York: W. W. Norton.  Burden’s Wheel is a story of technology obsolescence  Centralizing electrical power:  creates economies of scale  leads to obsolescence of other technologies  Users slowly rely on the technology change  Those who don’t embrace the change fall behind  What happened with electricity then is happening with computing today
  3. 3. Burden’s Wheel Source: Carr, N. (2008). Burden’s Wheel. In Big Switch: Rewiring the World, From Edison to Google (pp. 9- 24). New York: W. W. Norton. l “We may soon come to discover that what we believe to be the enduring fundamentals of our society are in fact only temporary structures, as easily abandoned as Henry Burdon’s wheel.” -Carr, N. (2008)
  4. 4. RAID: Redundant Array of Independent Disks  RAID Improves speed, data reliability or both.  Store a lot of data  Data is always available  Backup in case of a failed drive  Maximize storage and efficiency  Striping Data: Divide data and send a bit to each drive  RAID 1: Redundancy Data saved to second disk  RAID 5: Parity Parts of data is saved across several disk  RAID 6: Two sets of Parity  RAID 5-6 sacrifices some speed Source: Simply Storage: RAID. Web. Retrieved from http://www.dell.com/us/business/p/d/videos~en/Documents~simply-storage-raid.aspx.aspx
  5. 5. Assessing Repository Models Source: Rieger, O. Y. (2007). Select for Success: Key Principles in Assessing Repository Models. D-Lib Magazine, 13(7/8). Retrieved fromhttp://www.dlib.org/dlib/july07/rieger/07rieger.html
  6. 6. What a Repository Needs to Do  Enable digital asset management  Offer preservation services  Provide institutional visibility through access to collective intellectual work  Support learning, teaching, and research  Facilitate discovery of content  Enable re-use and re-purposing of content  Support archival business requirements  Offer alternative channels in support of scholarly communication  Organize information to allow effective content management and access  Provide access to outcomes of publicly funded research initiatives  Strengthen partnership between content creators/providers and content managers Source: Rieger, O. Y. (2007). Select for Success: Key Principles in Assessing Repository Models. D-Lib Magazine, 13(7/8). Retrieved fromhttp://www.dlib.org/dlib/july07/rieger/07rieger.html
  7. 7. Selecting a Repository Model 1. Identify Key Stakeholders 2. Conduct a Needs Assessment Analysis 3. Identify Resource Requirements 4. Understand the Existing Human Landscape Source: Rieger, O. Y. (2007). Select for Success: Key Principles in Assessing Repository Models. D-Lib Magazine, 13(7/8). Retrieved fromhttp://www.dlib.org/dlib/july07/rieger/07rieger.html
  8. 8. Selecting a Repository Model Source: Rieger, O. Y. (2007). Select for Success: Key Principles in Assessing Repository Models. D-Lib Magazine, 13(7/8). Retrieved fromhttp://www.dlib.org/dlib/july07/rieger/07rieger.html
  9. 9. Implementing EAD & Archivists’ Toolkit  Advantages of Encoded Archival Description (EAD)  Allows for interoperability  Encourages good descriptive habits  Standardizes presentation  Disadvantages of EAD  Lack of trained staff  Not cost effective Source: Schwartz, M. &KitchinTilman, R. (2012). Embracing Archivists’ Toolkit to Implement EAD. Proceedings of MARAC 2012, Oct. 27 2012, Richmond, VA.
  10. 10. Archival Management Systems  Archivists’ Toolkit – http://www.archiviststoolkit.org  Archon - http://www.archon.org/  *Archives Space - http://www.archivesspace.org/  Omeka - http://omeka.org/  CollectiveAccess – http://collectiveaccess.org  Archivematica- https://www.archivematica.org  Duraspace- http://duraspace.org/ (DSpace, Fedora)  Greenstone – http://greenstone.org  ContentDM – http://www.contentdm.org/ * Archives Space is the current Society of American Archivists standard. Archival Management Systems DigitalCollection Management Systems
  11. 11. Content Management Systems  WordPress – plugins for repositories and collections management  Drupal – Collective Access, CONTENTdm integration  Google Docs - Spreadsheets
  12. 12. Archivists’ Toolkit & Archon Source: Archivists’ Toolkit & Archon will soon be superceded by ArchivesSpace. Web. http://www.archiviststoolkit.org/content/archivists-toolkit-archon-will-soon-be-superseded- archivesspace
  13. 13. Archives Space  What is ArchivesSpace?  “The New York University Libraries, UC San Diego Libraries, and the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Libraries are partnering to develop a next-generation archives management application that will incorporate the best features of Archivist’s Toolkit (AT) and Archon.  With funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the project team is developing a technical platform, governance structure, and service model that will provide the archival community with a cutting-edge, extensible, and sustainable platform for describing analog and born-digital archival materials.” Source: About. Archives Space. http://www.archivesspace.org/about/
  14. 14. Source: Burden Wheel.png. Wikipedia. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Burden_Wheel.png

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