Stress is the excessive pressure on an
individual due to physical or psychological
demand.
The term "stress" was first used by the
endocrinologist Hans Selye in the 1930s
to identify physiological responses in
lab...
 Stressors are stimuli that cause stress
 Stressors – internal - e.g. pain, thoughts,
feelings, fear.
 external - e.g. ...
STRESS
EUSTRESS DISTRESS HYPOSTRESS HYPERSTRESS
Have you ever (I'm sure you have) felt:
- The feeling of excitement when you won a game
- The excitement when you bought y...
 These feelings sure make us feel good and they are the so-
called "good stress" or "positive stress".
 Exert healthy ef...
 Distress is a “negative stress”. It is a stress disorder that is caused
by adverse events and it often influences a pers...
 When a person is pushed beyond what he or she can handle,
they will experience hyperstress.
 Hyperstress results from b...
 Hypostress is experienced by a person who is constantly bored.
Someone in an unchallenging job, such as a factory worker...
Alarm is the first stage. When the threat or stressor is
identified or realized, the body's stress response is a state
of ...
Resistance is the second stage. If the stressor continue, it
becomes necessary to attempt some means of coping with the
st...
Task Demands
Stressors associated with the
specific job a person performs.
Some occupations are by nature
more stressful t...
Role Demands
Stressors associated with the role a person is
expected to play.
Interpersonal Demands
Stressors associated w...
Behavioral Consequences
The behavioral consequences of stress, such as
alcohol abuse, may harm the person under
stress or ...
Performance
One clear organizational consequence of too
much stress is a decline in performance.
Withdrawal
The most signi...
Burnout
Is the general feeling of exhaustion that
develops when an individual simultaneously
experiences too much pressure...
INDIVIDUAL
 Exercise
 Relaxation
 Role and task management
 Support group
 Vacation
 Spend time in nature
ORGANIZATI...
Ontology of Stress
Ontology of Stress
Ontology of Stress
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Ontology of Stress

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  • Everyone of us would probably experience different types of stress at one time or another. It could be some personal stress arising in the work place, strained family relationships with teenage children, emotional stress caused by financial problems, post traumatic disorders after an unhappy event like an accident or even feeling stress when you are on holiday!
  • Ontology of Stress

    1. 1. Stress is the excessive pressure on an individual due to physical or psychological demand.
    2. 2. The term "stress" was first used by the endocrinologist Hans Selye in the 1930s to identify physiological responses in laboratory animals.
    3. 3.  Stressors are stimuli that cause stress  Stressors – internal - e.g. pain, thoughts, feelings, fear.  external - e.g. heat, crowding, noise, the death of a family member . Stressstressor
    4. 4. STRESS EUSTRESS DISTRESS HYPOSTRESS HYPERSTRESS
    5. 5. Have you ever (I'm sure you have) felt: - The feeling of excitement when you won a game - The excitement when you bought your first car - The accomplishment of a challenge - The excitement of going for a holiday
    6. 6.  These feelings sure make us feel good and they are the so- called "good stress" or "positive stress".  Exert healthy effect on you.  Occurs for a short period of time.  Eustress is also often called the curative stress because it gives a person the ability to generate the best performance or maximum output.
    7. 7.  Distress is a “negative stress”. It is a stress disorder that is caused by adverse events and it often influences a person’s ability to deal with. Some events leading to distress are: - Death of a loved one - Financial problems - Heavy work responsibility and workload  Distress can be classified further as acute stress or chronic stress. Acute stress is short-lived while chronic stress is usually prolonged in nature.
    8. 8.  When a person is pushed beyond what he or she can handle, they will experience hyperstress.  Hyperstress results from being overloaded or overworked. It’s like being stressed out. When someone is hyperstressed, even little things can trigger a strong emotional response. People who are most likely to suffer from hyperstress are: - Working mothers who have to multi-task, juggling between work and family commitments - People who are under constant financial strains. - Generally people working in fast pace environment.
    9. 9.  Hypostress is experienced by a person who is constantly bored. Someone in an unchallenging job, such as a factory worker performing the same task over and over, will often experience hypostress. The effect of hypostress is feelings of restlessness and a lack of motivation.
    10. 10. Alarm is the first stage. When the threat or stressor is identified or realized, the body's stress response is a state of alarm
    11. 11. Resistance is the second stage. If the stressor continue, it becomes necessary to attempt some means of coping with the stress. Exhaustion is the third and final stage in the GAS model. At this point, all of the body's resources are eventually washed-out and the body is unable to maintain normal function.
    12. 12. Task Demands Stressors associated with the specific job a person performs. Some occupations are by nature more stressful than others. Physical Demands Stressors associated with the job’s physical setting, such as the satisfactoriness of temperature and lighting.
    13. 13. Role Demands Stressors associated with the role a person is expected to play. Interpersonal Demands Stressors associated with group pressures, leadership, and personality conflicts.
    14. 14. Behavioral Consequences The behavioral consequences of stress, such as alcohol abuse, may harm the person under stress or others. Psychological Consequences Psychological consequences relate to a person’s mental health and well-being. Medical Consequences Medical consequences affect a person’s physical well-being. Heart disease and stroke, among other illnesses, have been linked to stress.
    15. 15. Performance One clear organizational consequence of too much stress is a decline in performance. Withdrawal The most significant forms of withdrawal behavior are absenteeism and quitting. Attitudes Stress can have a negative effect on job satisfaction, morale, organizational commitment, and motivation to perform at high levels.
    16. 16. Burnout Is the general feeling of exhaustion that develops when an individual simultaneously experiences too much pressure and has too few sources of satisfaction.
    17. 17. INDIVIDUAL  Exercise  Relaxation  Role and task management  Support group  Vacation  Spend time in nature ORGANIZATIONAL  Supportive work and family policies  Effective management communication  Health insurance coverage  Flexible scheduling of work hours  Stress reduction workshops

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