As with almost all domestic conflicts, the division between the mother country of theUnited Kingdom of Britain and what wo...
Acts upon all of the colonies for the exploits just of one minor group of colonists, Englandeffectively forced the colonie...
clearly the major events were the end of the French and Indian War, the Boston Tea Party, andthe Battles of Lexington and ...
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Midterm essay response printed pdf

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The actual essay was handwritten. However, this is an exact reprint of the work turned in for my US History 170 mid-term exam. I received a 44 of 50 points on the essay portion and a 48 of 50 on the multiple choice portion. We could turn in up to five essay responses f

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Midterm essay response printed pdf

  1. 1. As with almost all domestic conflicts, the division between the mother country of theUnited Kingdom of Britain and what would become the United States of American was aprogression of slights, real or imagined, that effectively forced the thirteen unique entities to joinas one voice against England. That progression came the way of numerous actions and reactionsfrom both sides of the debate. However, there are three stages of the growing sense of unityamong the colonies that were more than mere steps. The end of the French and Indian War, theera of the Boston Tea Party, and the confusion of Lexington and Concord were giant leapstoward the unification of the colonies and the Revolution. Through it is rarely, if ever, a single episode that drives a people to severe the bonds thattie them to another, all conflicts must begin somewhere. For the American Revolution, that firststep was the end of the French and Indian War. The close of that war, by its nature, forcedParliament to pay closer attention to the colonies. To quell the Indians, England had promised theIndians they would not, via the colonists, settle further into Indian territory. Not only did thisupset the colonists, but the end of the war also paved the way for Parliament to scrutinize thecolonies even further. The further look at the colonies came in the form of more and more taxes,restrictions upon individual freedoms, and, most importantly, a lack of representation. Key to allthis, though, was that England no longer looked at the colonies as thirteen individual entities, butone whole unit – even if the colonies did not see this in themselves. The colonies may not have seen themselves quite yet a single entity by the time, whatwas more demagoguery than a serious political statement, the Sons of Liberty filled BostonHarbor with British tea. It might be argued that the English response to that act, the Coercive, orIntolerable, Acts did more to unify the colonies. As stated, however, the path to unification waspaved with many steps. The Boston Tea Party was the turning point for this stage of the processbecause it set in motion other events, particularly the Intolerable Acts. What England failed tosee was the colonial weakness of individualism. By instituting the harshness of the Intolerable
  2. 2. Acts upon all of the colonies for the exploits just of one minor group of colonists, Englandeffectively forced the colonies to unite and call together the First Continental Congress. By this point the path to colonial unification had become a paved road. Still, one mightargue to this point the English were largely to blame for what was comingdue to not payingcloser attention to the true colonial weakness. However, what came next was fully upon theshoulders of colonists and would change the course of history. It mattered not how it happened,the shot heard round the world ended all debate over unification and resolve of the colonies. Thebattles of Lexington and Concord was, truly, the beginning of the closing stages of colonialunification. Everyone knew the King would respond harshly against all the colonies to theskirmishing in New England. The leaders of the colonies had already been preparing for thismoment anyway. All that was left now was to make it official. To end any lingering doubts aboutthe colonies having equal stakes in the Revolution, Congress looked to George Washington. Notonly did he have a reputation for honesty, for choosing honest friends, and for piety, Washingtonwas from the southern colony of Virginia. A wiser choice could not have been made. Any other man chosen to lead the ContinentalArmy would have been defeated handily. We know this because, by the standards of the era,more than once Washington “lost” critical battles. However, unlike most men, he did not let hispride lose the war. Instead, he brought guerilla warfare to the worlds superpowers. Yet,Washington brought an even greater legacy to Independence. So rarely in history has ever aconquering general not declared himself emperor supreme afterward. That single gesture broughta lot of capital to the formation of the new government, most notably when Washington was[eventually] able to quell a pending coup. Washington punctuated the road to colonial solidarity. Everyone will have their views ofthe defining moments of the many events leading up to the American Revolution. However,
  3. 3. clearly the major events were the end of the French and Indian War, the Boston Tea Party, andthe Battles of Lexington and Concord

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