Presenter: Synthia Shelby Louisville Writing Project Writing to Learn  Across The Content
Objectives:  <ul><li>Define Writing to Learn </li></ul><ul><li>Practice two Writing to Learn Strategies </li></ul><ul><li>...
Writing to Learn  <ul><li>The quick, exploratory, extemporaneous in-class writing that helps kids engage deeply with conte...
Check-up vs Autopsy  <ul><li>A Check-up  (Writing To Learn) allows the teacher to identify what the student is thinking an...
Writing Break : <ul><li>To get true learning power, kids must put ideas into their own words.  </li></ul><ul><li>(Harvey D...
<ul><li>D </li></ul><ul><li>I </li></ul><ul><li>S </li></ul><ul><li>C </li></ul><ul><li>U </li></ul><ul><li>S </li></ul><u...
Examples of Writing to Learn Activities <ul><li>Quick Writes:  (3-7 min.) </li></ul><ul><li>Easy Writing-to Learn  </li></...
Writing Break <ul><li>Benefits: Teacher stops talking and allows student to think. Quick sharing with partners and/or whol...
Double Entry Journal <ul><li>Benefits:  Double-entry journals give students a way to  interpret  text in their own words a...
Double Entry Journal Activity What event has happened? Girl Boxes People List your questions, thoughts or ideas Identify y...
 
Partner Up 1. Double-entry journal 2.  In what content areas could this apply and explain why Small Group 3.  Review stude...
Bibliography Allen, Janet.  (2004) Tools for Teaching Content Literacy.  Portland, ME:  Stenhouse. Daniels, Harvey, Zemelm...
<ul><li>Contact Information </li></ul><ul><li>email:  [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>blog:  http://www.gurushelby.blogs...
<ul><li>&quot;I cannot teach anybody anything,  </li></ul><ul><li>I can only make them think.&quot; - Socrates, Greek Phil...
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Urban Sites Nertwork Presentation - Writing to Learn Across the Content

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Writing to Learn presentation for the Urban Sites Network Conference in Portland, Oregon - April 23-24, 2010.

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  • Introduce yourself. Take a survey of the room Elementary, High, Middle, College, Other. How many people teach a content outside of Language Arts in the room. Presentation will provide something for everyone. Due to time, we will take most of our questions at the end. Thank you.
  • How many people are already using this in their classrooms. Writing does not have to be formal to be effective. Integrating informal writing to learn activities across the curriculum promotes thinking and learning.
  • Handout created with this information on it for participants
  • What content could this be used in? How could you use this in your classroom? Why is the use of a visual important?
  • Urban Sites Nertwork Presentation - Writing to Learn Across the Content

    1. 1. Presenter: Synthia Shelby Louisville Writing Project Writing to Learn Across The Content
    2. 2. Objectives: <ul><li>Define Writing to Learn </li></ul><ul><li>Practice two Writing to Learn Strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Examine how to use these strategies </li></ul><ul><li>in your classroom </li></ul><ul><li>Review student examples </li></ul>
    3. 3. Writing to Learn <ul><li>The quick, exploratory, extemporaneous in-class writing that helps kids engage deeply with content, build connections, and retain what they’ve learned. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Check-up vs Autopsy <ul><li>A Check-up (Writing To Learn) allows the teacher to identify what the student is thinking and has learned or wants to know regarding content. </li></ul><ul><li>WTL provides a FORMATIVE (process-based) assessment rather than a SUMMATIVE assessment. WTL allows the teacher to modify and/or differentiate instruction for learners on a daily/weekly basis instead of the end (Autopsy) of a unit, etc. </li></ul>
    5. 5. Writing Break : <ul><li>To get true learning power, kids must put ideas into their own words. </li></ul><ul><li>(Harvey Daniels ) </li></ul>
    6. 6. <ul><li>D </li></ul><ul><li>I </li></ul><ul><li>S </li></ul><ul><li>C </li></ul><ul><li>U </li></ul><ul><li>S </li></ul><ul><li>S </li></ul><ul><li>I </li></ul><ul><li>O </li></ul><ul><li>N </li></ul>- Elbow Partners
    7. 7. Examples of Writing to Learn Activities <ul><li>Quick Writes: (3-7 min.) </li></ul><ul><li>Easy Writing-to Learn </li></ul><ul><li>Strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Writing Break </li></ul><ul><li>Exit Slip </li></ul><ul><li>Admit Slip </li></ul><ul><li>Brainstorming </li></ul><ul><li>Drawing and </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrating </li></ul><ul><li>Clustering </li></ul><ul><li>Mapping </li></ul><ul><li>Going Deeper with </li></ul><ul><li>Writing-to-Learn </li></ul><ul><li>(more time and teacher prep) </li></ul><ul><li>Written Conversation </li></ul><ul><li>Write-Around </li></ul><ul><li>Carousel Brainstorming </li></ul><ul><li>Double-Entry Journal </li></ul><ul><li>Nonstop Write </li></ul><ul><li>Reflective Write </li></ul><ul><li>KWL </li></ul>
    8. 8. Writing Break <ul><li>Benefits: Teacher stops talking and allows student to think. Quick sharing with partners and/or whole class to discuss thoughts. </li></ul><ul><li>Definition: Students stop and reflect in writing on the activities happening or information being presented. </li></ul>
    9. 9. Double Entry Journal <ul><li>Benefits: Double-entry journals give students a way to interpret text in their own words and reflect on material they have been taught. </li></ul><ul><li>Definition: a two column graphic organizer. On the left side (observations, quotes, pictures, etc.) on the right side (questions, thoughts, etc.) </li></ul>
    10. 10. Double Entry Journal Activity What event has happened? Girl Boxes People List your questions, thoughts or ideas Identify your observations/
    11. 12. Partner Up 1. Double-entry journal 2. In what content areas could this apply and explain why Small Group 3. Review student work Implication student work, activities, and discussions have for student learning and/or your classroom.
    12. 13. Bibliography Allen, Janet. (2004) Tools for Teaching Content Literacy. Portland, ME: Stenhouse. Daniels, Harvey, Zemelman, Steven, and Stieneke Nancy. (2007) Content-Area Writing: Every Teacher’s Guide. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Daniels, Harvey and Zemelman Steven. (2004) Subjects Matter: Every Teacher’s Guide to Content-Area Reading. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Esquith, Rafe. (2007)Teach Like Your Hair’s on Fire: The Methods and Madness Inside Room 56. New York, NY: Penguin Group Guatemalan trash dump http://i.treehugger.com/images/2007/10/24/506x19 0_recycledlife01.jpg
    13. 14. <ul><li>Contact Information </li></ul><ul><li>email: [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>blog: http://www.gurushelby.blogspot.com </li></ul><ul><li>Thank you and have a marvelous day! </li></ul>
    14. 15. <ul><li>&quot;I cannot teach anybody anything, </li></ul><ul><li>I can only make them think.&quot; - Socrates, Greek Philospher </li></ul><ul><li> DIG deeper, PUSH harder and GO beyond </li></ul><ul><li> the routine. Critical thinking and inquiry </li></ul><ul><li>are partners that must be invited into our classrooms daily. </li></ul><ul><li>Synthia Shelby and Kristin Storey </li></ul>

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