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Topic: North Texas | Ozone and The Clean Air Act

In conjunction with Air North Texas's Clean Air Action Day on Friday, June 27, 2014, the North Texas Commission and the Clean Air Texas Initiative presented this special Topic: North Texas Webinar about ozone in North Texas and the Clean Air Act. This was the third in a special series of webinars during the summer (2014) about ozone and regional air quality.

Last summer (2013), our region's ozone level was 87 parts per billion (ppb), which is still too high to pass the EPA's standard of 75 ppb. Consequently, the Clean Air Act requires the State of Texas to draft a "State Implementation Plan" (SIP) which details specific actions that the state intends to take to bring our ozone levels down to an acceptable level. Although a complex and daunting document, the SIP impacts North Texas in countless ways, from power plants to how we fill up our cars.

Chris Klaus and Mindy Mize are two of North Texas's most respected leaders on air quality planning and are helping to draft the next SIP for the Dallas-Fort Worth area. Their program will provide insight into the air quality regulatory process and how this next round of ozone planning will impact North Texas.

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Topic: North Texas | Ozone and The Clean Air Act

  1. 1. OZONE CLEAN AIR ACT In North Texas & TH E
  2. 2. OZONE IN NORTH TEXAS AND THE CLEAN AIR ACT North Texas Commission Topics: North Texas Webinar Series June 25, 2014 Chris Klaus, Senior Program Manager Mindy Mize, Program Manager Air Quality Planning & Operations NCTCOG Transportation Department
  3. 3. Clean Air Act (CAA) last amended in 1990 Requires Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for six criteria pollutants: Carbon Monoxide (CO) Lead (Pb) Nitrogen Oxides (NOX) Ozone (O3) Particulate Matter (PM) Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) EPA must complete a review of NAAQS every 5 years CLEAN AIR ACT 3
  4. 4. OZONE FORMATION Biogenic Sources Off-Road Engines On-Road Vehicles + Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) + Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) = Ozone Area Sources Non-Road Engines Point Sources Optimum conditions for the formation of ozone include high temperatures and low winds. 4
  5. 5. NCTCOG PLANNING AREA 5
  6. 6. EMISSION SOURCES On-Road Mobile 181 tpd (49%) Non-Road Mobile 64 tpd (17%) Off-Road 37 tpd (10%) Point Source 51 tpd (14%) Area (Excluding Oil & Gas) 18 tpd (5%) Oil & Gas Production & Drilling 19 tpd (5%) Total NOX = 370 tons per day (tpd) 6 Source: TCEQ Nitrogen Oxides (NOX)
  7. 7. *Not a full year of data, current as of 6/19//2014 Note: The 2009-2013 data has been certified by TCEQ, and is currently undergoing review by the EPA for concurrence. Source: TCEQ, http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/cgi-bin/compliance/monops/8hr_monthly.pl ppb = parts per billion OZONE EXCEEDANCE DAYS 19 14 20 15 14 11 20 23 17 13 21 22 10 19 24 22 1 34 30 32 29 34 29 24 36 27 10 8 10 8 15 9 9 12 13 11 5 5 4 4 12 6 3 1 2 6 3 1 5 2 1 1 1 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014* ExceedanceDays Ozone Season (Year) Purple (116+ ppb) Red (96-115 ppb) Orange (85-95 ppb) Orange (76-84 ppb) Exceedance Level indicates daily maximum 8-hour average ozone concentration. Exceedance Levels are based on Air Quality Index (AQI) thresholds established by the EPA for the for the revised ozone standard of 75 ppb. = Additional level orange exceedance days under the revised standard that were not exceedances under the previous 84 ppb standard. (AQI level orange = 76-95 ppb) Exceedance Levels 7
  8. 8. 2013 HIGHEST EXCEEDANCE DAY 8 September 4th – 100 ppb at Fort Worth Northwest
  9. 9. 102 101 99 100 98 95 96 95 91 86 86 90 87 87 78 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 105 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Consecutive Three-Year Periods Source: NCTCOG TR Dept 4thHighestAverage atanyGivenMonitor(ppb) ^Attainment Goal - According to the US EPA National Ambient Air Quality Standards, attainment is reached when, at each monitor, the three-year average of the annual fourth-highest daily maximum 8-hour average ozone concentration is equal to or less than 75 parts per billion (ppb). *Not a full year of data, current as of 6/19//2014. Note: The 2009-2013 data has been certified by TCEQ, and is currently undergoing review by the EPA for concurrence. 1997 Standard < 85 ppb 2008 Revised Standard ≤ 75 ppb^ HISTORICAL TRENDS IN OZONE 9
  10. 10. 2008 = 8-Hour Ozone Standard Revised to 75 ppb State Designation Recommendations Submitted to EPA; Hood County Considered for Inclusion into Nonattainment Area 2010 = Reconsideration of Standard (60-70 ppb) Standard Put On Hold (75 ppb) 2011 = Withdrawal of Reconsideration (60-70 ppb) Standard Resumed (75 ppb) 2012 = Final Designations by EPA, Wise County Added to Nonattainment Region 2013 = Conformity Determination 2015 = State Submits SIP to EPA 2018 = “Moderate” Attainment Deadline (2016-2018 Ozone Data) 8-HOUR OZONE STANDARD TIMELINE 10
  11. 11. 2015 SIP TIMELINE 11 April 20, 2014 = Deadline for Submitting Control Measure Ideas for RACM 8-Hour Ozone Standard Revised to 75 ppb May – August 2014 = TCEQ Technical Work Finalized December 2014 = Public Comment Period Begins January 2015 = Public Hearings June 2015 = TCEQ Commissioners Adopt the SIP July 20, 2015 = Deadline for State to Submit SIP to EPA Various = Quarterly Public Air Quality Technical Committee Meetings Hosted by NCTCOG (Next Meeting – August 2014)
  12. 12. AIR QUALITY PROGRAMS 12
  13. 13. AIR NORTH TEXAS 13
  14. 14. CLEAN AIR ACTION DAY First Friday of summer every year People commit to adopting one clean air strategy for the day Organizations and businesses promote the day with contests and events for employees June 27, 2014 | www.airnorthtexas.org 14
  15. 15. CLEAN AIR ACTION DAY 15 Enter company name, email and zip code Select commitments, share story, upload video and photos www.airnorthtexas.org/cleanair.asp
  16. 16. CLEAN AIR STRATEGIES Organizations/Businesses/Governments Move construction activities to evening hours Postpone mowing to a day with healthy air Conserve electricity Limit testing of emergency generators Coordinate on-site employee lunches Use audio and video conference call technology Purchase clean vehicles/DFW Clean Cities 16 Photo Sources: Thinkstock
  17. 17. CLEAN AIR STRATEGIES Individuals Conserve water to conserve electricity Bicycle or walk Use mass transit or rideshare (i.e. carpool, vanpool) Take lunch to work/carpool to lunch Conserve electricity Telecommute Purchase Clean Vehicles/DFW Clean Cities 17 Photo Sources: Thinkstock
  18. 18. CAA last revised in 1990 Ozone standards reviewed and/or updated every 5 years CAA needs to be updated to account for new rules and regulations EPA is finalizing a 5 year review of the 8-hour ozone standard Proposed standard must be released by December 1, 2014 New standard must be finalized by October 1, 2015 60 – 70 ppb recommended by the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee Challenges for DFW Region Population increasing Vehicle Miles of Travel increasing Background ozone levels ~45-55 ppb during ozone season Looking Toward the Future 8-HOUR OZONE STANDARD 18
  19. 19. Questions? 19

In conjunction with Air North Texas's Clean Air Action Day on Friday, June 27, 2014, the North Texas Commission and the Clean Air Texas Initiative presented this special Topic: North Texas Webinar about ozone in North Texas and the Clean Air Act. This was the third in a special series of webinars during the summer (2014) about ozone and regional air quality. Last summer (2013), our region's ozone level was 87 parts per billion (ppb), which is still too high to pass the EPA's standard of 75 ppb. Consequently, the Clean Air Act requires the State of Texas to draft a "State Implementation Plan" (SIP) which details specific actions that the state intends to take to bring our ozone levels down to an acceptable level. Although a complex and daunting document, the SIP impacts North Texas in countless ways, from power plants to how we fill up our cars. Chris Klaus and Mindy Mize are two of North Texas's most respected leaders on air quality planning and are helping to draft the next SIP for the Dallas-Fort Worth area. Their program will provide insight into the air quality regulatory process and how this next round of ozone planning will impact North Texas.

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