“BUT I WANT TO WORK WITH MY
FRIENDS!”
Jill Clark
Whitireia New Zealand
Trish Baker
Wellington Institute of Technology
Sele...
Group Selection
• Self selection:
– Students select their own group
• Random selection:
– Students grouped according to a ...
Optimal Group Size
• General consensus:
– Three – five members
– Odd numbers
• Under three:
– Less diversity
– Less variet...
Three to five students in a group
allows:
• Diversity of member skills and ideas
• Easier development of group cohesion
• ...
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NTLT 2013 - Jill Clark and Trish Baker - “But I want to work with my friends!” Selecting student groups

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“But I want to work with my friends!” Selecting student groups

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NTLT 2013 - Jill Clark and Trish Baker - “But I want to work with my friends!” Selecting student groups

  1. 1. “BUT I WANT TO WORK WITH MY FRIENDS!” Jill Clark Whitireia New Zealand Trish Baker Wellington Institute of Technology Selecting student groups
  2. 2. Group Selection • Self selection: – Students select their own group • Random selection: – Students grouped according to a criterion randomly determined by the lecturer • Lecturer selection: – Lecturers select the groups based on their knowledge of the students and their abilities. The groups may also be determined by asking students to fill in questionnaires about preferred working style, linguistic proficiency, skills, study habits etc.
  3. 3. Optimal Group Size • General consensus: – Three – five members – Odd numbers • Under three: – Less diversity – Less variety of ideas and skills – Probability of one dominant partner • Over five: – Likelihood of “free loaders” – Hard for students to manage logistics – Probability of one or two dominant partners
  4. 4. Three to five students in a group allows: • Diversity of member skills and ideas • Easier development of group cohesion • Visibility of all members - more accountability • Less chance of group fragmentation • More chance of meaningful contributions from all members • Easier management of meeting times/ venues

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