An Introduction to
Residencies 2010
Elizabeth Sebranek Evans, Pharm.D., BCPS
November 11, 2010
Evolution of Pharmacist Training and Credentials
• The Doctor of Pharmacy degree became
mandatory for accredited Colleges ...
Evolution of Pharmacist Training and Credentials
• After residency training, Board Certification strongly
encouraged by ma...
What is a Residency?
• An postgraduate training opportunity in a specified
setting that allows pharmacists to:
– Build on ...
Why Complete a Residency?
• Preferred for many types of positions
– Hospital/health-system pharmacy management
– Clinical ...
What are Future Job Opportunities
After Residency?
• Disease state management in
community pharmacy
• College faculty
• Cl...
Classification of Residencies:
PGY-1 vs. PGY-2
• PGY- 1 (post-graduate year #1)
– Designed to be completed first, usually ...
Types of PGY-1 Residencies
• Community pharmacy-based residencies
– There are programs based in community/retail
pharmacie...
Types of PGY-1 Residencies
• Pharmacy Practice in a Veterans Affairs hospital
• Pharmacy Practice in a children’s hospital...
Types of PGY-1 Residencies
• Pharmacy Practice in Indian Health Service
• Pharmacy Practice in a military facility
• Pharm...
Residency Application Timeline
• P3 year early December
– Attend ASHP Midyear Clinical Meeting
• Residency showcase: Open ...
Residency Application Timeline
• January and February
– Receive interview invitations from sites
– Interview at sites
– Si...
Barriers to Residency
• Loss of income
– 1/3 - 1/2 of a pharmacist’s salary (Avg. $37,600, range:
32K – 42.7K)
– Often dif...
What are Local Residency Opportunities?
• University of Utah
– 4 PGY1 positions inpatient hospital
– 1 PGY1 position in co...
How Competitive is it to Obtain a Residency?
• 2010 National Match Statistics:
– Approximately 3000 applicants signed up f...
What if I Wait a Few Years to
Do A Residency?
• Cons
– You may lose valuable sources of information about
residencies afte...
What Makes an Excellent
Resident Candidate?
• Excellent work ethic and communication
skills required
• Strong clinical ski...
How Can a USN Student Become a More
Competitive Residency Candidate?
• Clinical Skills Opportunities
– ACCP Clinical Chall...
How Can a USN Student Become a More
Competitive Residency Candidate?
• APPE rotations
– Select challenging clinical sites
...
More Information
• American Society of Health-Systems
Pharmacists (ASHP)
– www.ashp.org
– Directory of accredited residenc...
More Information
• American Pharmacists Association (APhA)
– www.aphanet.org
– Only provides information on community resi...
Faculty Resources
• Dr. Boehme (sboeme@usn.edu)
– Pediatric transplant and pediatric general medicine
residency preceptor ...
Faculty Resources
• Dr. Drake (tdrake@usn.edu)
– Ambulatory care residency preceptor at
McKay-Dee Hospital
– Residency Dir...
Faculty Resources
• Dr. Kobayashi (kkobayashi@usn.edu)
– Completed PGY1 at Intermountain Medical Center
– Completed PGY2 i...
Faculty Resources
• Dr. Smith (ksmith@usn.edu)
– Completed PGY1 residency at University of Arizona
Medical Center, Tucson,...
Faculty Resources
• Dr. Stahl (estahl@usn.edu)
– Completed PGY1 at St. Joseph’s Hospital, Denver, CO
– Completed PGY2 in I...
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Intro to residencies 2010

  1. 1. An Introduction to Residencies 2010 Elizabeth Sebranek Evans, Pharm.D., BCPS November 11, 2010
  2. 2. Evolution of Pharmacist Training and Credentials • The Doctor of Pharmacy degree became mandatory for accredited Colleges of Pharmacy beginning in 1999 • Residency training began steadily increasing as next level of mandatory minimal training – American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) has a vision of residency as a prerequisite for direct patient care by 2020
  3. 3. Evolution of Pharmacist Training and Credentials • After residency training, Board Certification strongly encouraged by many employers – Pharmacotherapy Specialist – Oncology – Psychiatry – Nutrition Support – Geriatrics – Diabetes Educator – American Academy of HIV Medicine
  4. 4. What is a Residency? • An postgraduate training opportunity in a specified setting that allows pharmacists to: – Build on their knowledge base – Improved clinical skills and confidence – Provide independent and effective patient care • Opportunity for continued clinical learning with benefit of being licensed pharmacist • Most residencies are one year in length (July 1s -June 30th)
  5. 5. Why Complete a Residency? • Preferred for many types of positions – Hospital/health-system pharmacy management – Clinical pharmacist – College faculty • Improved marketability • Residency = 3 years of practice experience • Eligibility for board certification • Exposure to more clinical experiences • Opportunities to provide patient care in a “protected” setting within a learning environment • Career networking!!
  6. 6. What are Future Job Opportunities After Residency? • Disease state management in community pharmacy • College faculty • Clinical pharmacist or specialist in hospital or outpatient clinic • HMO/Managed Care benefits manager • Pharmaceutical Industry • Clinical coordinator • Hospital pharmacy manager
  7. 7. Classification of Residencies: PGY-1 vs. PGY-2 • PGY- 1 (post-graduate year #1) – Designed to be completed first, usually immediately after completing a Doctor of Pharmacy degree program – Many PGY-1 residencies offer a broad array of experiences • PGY-2 (post-graduate year #2) – Intended to be completed after PGY-1 year – Specialized area of focus (pediatrics, critical care, solid organ transplant, oncology, drug information, etc.)
  8. 8. Types of PGY-1 Residencies • Community pharmacy-based residencies – There are programs based in community/retail pharmacies – Many also have a college of pharmacy affiliation – Perform direct patient care with an emphasis on disease state management (dyslipidemia, diabetes, hypertension, immunizations, etc.) • Practice Management – Learn how to develop and evaluate advanced practice sites in the community setting – Learn how to market services and receive financial compensation!
  9. 9. Types of PGY-1 Residencies • Pharmacy Practice in a Veterans Affairs hospital • Pharmacy Practice in a children’s hospital • Pharmacy Practice through a College of Pharmacy • Pharmacy Practice with an ambulatory care focus
  10. 10. Types of PGY-1 Residencies • Pharmacy Practice in Indian Health Service • Pharmacy Practice in a military facility • Pharmacy Practice with an emphasis in psychiatric pharmacy • Pharmacy Practice in home infusion • Managed care pharmacy-based residencies
  11. 11. Residency Application Timeline • P3 year early December – Attend ASHP Midyear Clinical Meeting • Residency showcase: Open house with most accredited residency programs • Personal placement service (PPS): Opportunity for one-on-one interviews with residency programs directors • Mid-December – Submit applications to programs • Requirements vary but programs may require CV, personal statements, examples of clinical projects, etc. • Usually need three letters of recommendation • Transcripts required
  12. 12. Residency Application Timeline • January and February – Receive interview invitations from sites – Interview at sites – Sign up with National Matching Service • Early March – Rank interview sites and submit to National Matching Service by Match Deadline • Mid-March – Match results release mid-March • July – Start residency
  13. 13. Barriers to Residency • Loss of income – 1/3 - 1/2 of a pharmacist’s salary (Avg. $37,600, range: 32K – 42.7K) – Often difficult to make student loan payments on a resident’s salary – Not all loans deferrable during residency • Distance – May require relocation • Workload – Requires hard work and self-motivation – Usually requires > 40 hours per week – May need to provide “on call” services
  14. 14. What are Local Residency Opportunities? • University of Utah – 4 PGY1 positions inpatient hospital – 1 PGY1 position in community pharmacy • Intermountain Healthcare – 2 PGY1 positions McKay-Dee Hospital – 3 PGY1 positions Intermountain Medical Center – 3 PGY1 positions Primary Children’s Hospital – 2 PGY1 positions Utah Valley Medical Center – 1 PGY1 position in managed care at Select Health – 1 PGY1/PGY2 position in practice management • VA Medical Center – 2 PGY1 positions
  15. 15. How Competitive is it to Obtain a Residency? • 2010 National Match Statistics: – Approximately 3000 applicants signed up for the Match – Approximately 2000 residency positions were in the Match – On Match Day, about 1850 residency positions were matched between positions and candidates – About 150 residency positions were left unmatched and 1150 applicants left to “scramble” for positions
  16. 16. What if I Wait a Few Years to Do A Residency? • Cons – You may lose valuable sources of information about residencies after graduations – It takes a great deal of discipline to transition from full pharmacist salary to resident salary – Would need to take time off of work to interview for residencies – Delay achieving your long term goals • Pros – Pharmacist work experience and time management skills will make you a stronger resident candidate
  17. 17. What Makes an Excellent Resident Candidate? • Excellent work ethic and communication skills required • Strong clinical skills • Going “above and beyond” basic requirements for graduation – Leadership – Community service – Scholarship
  18. 18. How Can a USN Student Become a More Competitive Residency Candidate? • Clinical Skills Opportunities – ACCP Clinical Challenge (September) – ASHP Clinical Skills Competition (October) – APhA Patient Counseling Competition (January?) • Leadership – Active participation in student organizations – Attendance and active participation at local and national pharmacy organization meetings – Networking, networking, networking! • Community service – Health fairs – Brown-bag events
  19. 19. How Can a USN Student Become a More Competitive Residency Candidate? • APPE rotations – Select challenging clinical sites – Consider sites with unique opportunities – Proactively seek opportunities for journal clubs, presentations, and quality-improvement projects • Scholarship – Formal research opportunities with science or clinical faculty – Submit case reports or review articles to peer-reviewed medical journals for publication – Present posters at state (USHP, UPhA) or national meetings (APhA, ACCP, ASHP) – Develop high-quality patient education materials
  20. 20. More Information • American Society of Health-Systems Pharmacists (ASHP) – www.ashp.org – Directory of accredited residency programs available online (search for free) – “Professional Development: Residencies, the ASHP midyear clinical meeting, and more” (The “Blue Book”) • Careful! This hasn’t been updated since 2005 • American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) – www.accp.com – Directory of residencies and fellowships available online – Free online job and residency position searches
  21. 21. More Information • American Pharmacists Association (APhA) – www.aphanet.org – Only provides information on community residencies but generous detail available
  22. 22. Faculty Resources • Dr. Boehme (sboeme@usn.edu) – Pediatric transplant and pediatric general medicine residency preceptor at Primary Children’s Hospital • Dr. Chan (achan@usn.edu) – Completed PGY1 at Utah Valley Medical Center – Adult internal medicine residency preceptor (starting 2010-2011) at Intermountain Medical Center • Dr. Christensen (tchristensen@usn.edu) – Critical care / cardiology residency preceptor at Utah Valley Medical Center
  23. 23. Faculty Resources • Dr. Drake (tdrake@usn.edu) – Ambulatory care residency preceptor at McKay-Dee Hospital – Residency Director at McKay-Dee Hospital • Dr. Harper (mharper@usn.edu) – Critical care residency preceptor at McKay-Dee Hospital • Dr. Healy (rhealy@usn.edu) – Completed PGY1 residency at Intermountain Medical Center – In process of completing PGY2 residency in Oncology / Teaching through Intermountain Medical Center and USN
  24. 24. Faculty Resources • Dr. Kobayashi (kkobayashi@usn.edu) – Completed PGY1 at Intermountain Medical Center – Completed PGY2 in Internal Medicine / Teaching with Intermountain Medical Center and USN – Adult internal medicine residency preceptor (starting 2010-2011) at Intermountain Medical Center • Dr. Sebranek (esebranek@usn.edu) – Completed PGY1 at Froedtert Hospital, Milwaukee, WI – Adult internal medicine residency preceptor at Intermountain Medical Center – Member of Intermountain Medical Center Residency- Advisory Committee
  25. 25. Faculty Resources • Dr. Smith (ksmith@usn.edu) – Completed PGY1 residency at University of Arizona Medical Center, Tucson, AZ – Completed PGY2 specialty residency in pediatrics at University of Tennessee, Le Bonheur Children’s Medical Center – Precepted pharmacy residents on neonatology rotation at University Medical Center of Southern Nevada
  26. 26. Faculty Resources • Dr. Stahl (estahl@usn.edu) – Completed PGY1 at St. Joseph’s Hospital, Denver, CO – Completed PGY2 in Internal Medicine at St. Joseph’s Hospital, Denver, CO – Adult internal medicine residency preceptor at Intermountain Medical Center • Dr. Strohecker (jstrohecker@usn.edu) – Ambulatory care residency preceptor at Intermountain Medical Center

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