Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
NRDC: Deep-Sea Treasures 
Atlantic Coast Deep-Sea Corals
Deep-sea coral communities have been found in abundance in many of the Mid-Atlantic's more than two dozen submarine canyon...
Deep-sea coral species are diverse in size, shape, and color. Image adapted from NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Northeast ...
Unlike shallow-water corals, deep-sea corals do not require sunlight to survive and are commonly found in waters between 5...
Recent expeditions to the Atlantic Coast's underwater canyons and nearby seamounts (extinct volcanoes rising up from the o...
Coral communities form the foundation of deep-sea ecosystems, providing food, shelter from predators, and nursery areas fo...
This Paramuricea coral off the U.S. Atlantic coast is host to several egg cases (three can be seen attached near the top o...
A white Paragorgia coral with sea urchin. Image adapted from NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedit...
The Mid-Atlantic's canyons are considered biodiversity 'hotspots,' containing significant and diverse concentrations of ma...
Many of the creatures found in these deep-sea environments are breathtakingly beautiful. Here, a rarely-seen bioluminescen...
A bioluminescent hydromedusa jellyfish seen in Washington Canyon. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Our 
De...
A brittle star in Atlantis Canyon can be seen wrapped tightly around a pink octocoral (a subclass of corals named for thei...
Corals can be hundreds of years old. Deep-sea corals are exceptionally long-lived and slow growing –- some species grow on...
In Baltimore Canyon offshore Maryland, scientists discovered a nearly 15-foot tall colony of Paragorgia or 'bubblegum' cor...
Because deep-sea corals are fragile and slow growing, they are highly vulnerable to harm from fishing gear, such as bottom...
Shown here is a close-up of a black coral. While the depth and ruggedness of the areas where corals are found in the Mid-A...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

NRDC: Deep-Sea Treasures - Slideshow

1,005 views

Published on

Teeming with an astonishing variety and abundance of marine life, the Atlantic Coast's canyons and seamounts are ocean oases. (See http://www.nrdc.org/oceans/canyons/default.asp for more information.)

Published in: Environment
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

NRDC: Deep-Sea Treasures - Slideshow

  1. 1. NRDC: Deep-Sea Treasures Atlantic Coast Deep-Sea Corals
  2. 2. Deep-sea coral communities have been found in abundance in many of the Mid-Atlantic's more than two dozen submarine canyons, which lie 60 to 100 miles offshore and can plunge as deep as the Grand Canyon. Image adapted from NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition 2013.
  3. 3. Deep-sea coral species are diverse in size, shape, and color. Image adapted from NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition 2013.
  4. 4. Unlike shallow-water corals, deep-sea corals do not require sunlight to survive and are commonly found in waters between 50 and 1,000 meters deep. Here, the NOAA remote-operated submersible vehicle (ROV) Deep Discoverer illuminates a coral 'forest' in a submarine canyon off the Atlantic coast during a 2013 dive. Image adapted from NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition 2013.
  5. 5. Recent expeditions to the Atlantic Coast's underwater canyons and nearby seamounts (extinct volcanoes rising up from the ocean floor) have resulted in a steady stream of discovery and revelation. In 2013, scientists found this potential new species of black coral in Block Canyon. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition 2013.
  6. 6. Coral communities form the foundation of deep-sea ecosystems, providing food, shelter from predators, and nursery areas for young fish and crustaceans. Here, a squat lobster and other marine animals congregate around several corals and sponges -– one of the corals may be a new species. Image adapted from NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition 2013.
  7. 7. This Paramuricea coral off the U.S. Atlantic coast is host to several egg cases (three can be seen attached near the top of the coral's arms). Image adapted from NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition 2013.
  8. 8. A white Paragorgia coral with sea urchin. Image adapted from NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition 2013.
  9. 9. The Mid-Atlantic's canyons are considered biodiversity 'hotspots,' containing significant and diverse concentrations of marine life, like this octopus, various fish and crustacean species, and on up the food chain to marine mammals, like endangered sperm and fin whales. Image adapted from NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition 2013.
  10. 10. Many of the creatures found in these deep-sea environments are breathtakingly beautiful. Here, a rarely-seen bioluminescent dandelion siphonophore floats in the water column. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Our Deepwater Backyard: Exploring Atlantic Canyons and Seamounts 2014.
  11. 11. A bioluminescent hydromedusa jellyfish seen in Washington Canyon. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Our Deepwater Backyard: Exploring Atlantic Canyons and Seamounts 2014.
  12. 12. A brittle star in Atlantis Canyon can be seen wrapped tightly around a pink octocoral (a subclass of corals named for their eightfold structural symmetry). Image adapted from NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition 2013.
  13. 13. Corals can be hundreds of years old. Deep-sea corals are exceptionally long-lived and slow growing –- some species grow only 1.5 to 2.5 millimeters a year. Image adapted from NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition 2013.
  14. 14. In Baltimore Canyon offshore Maryland, scientists discovered a nearly 15-foot tall colony of Paragorgia or 'bubblegum' coral like this one. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition 2013.
  15. 15. Because deep-sea corals are fragile and slow growing, they are highly vulnerable to harm from fishing gear, such as bottom trawls. This rock face of corals in Block Canyon could be scraped off by one pass of a trawl net, eliminating these important deep-sea communities for any ecologically relevant period of time. Image adapted from NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition.
  16. 16. Shown here is a close-up of a black coral. While the depth and ruggedness of the areas where corals are found in the Mid-Atlantic has largely protected them from destructive fishing gear, fishing technology and market demands could change. The time to protect these areas is now. Image adapted from NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition 2013.

×