NPR DS Guide to Aggregation

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NPR DS Guide to Aggregation

  1. 1.    Aggregaon  
  2. 2. What  is  Aggregaon?      Aggrega(on  means  ac(ng  as  a  filter  for  your  audience    Aggrega(on    Cura(on   2  
  3. 3. Aggregaon  “I  love  aggrega(on.”     5  
  4. 4. I  love  aggrega(on.  Aggrega(ng,  as  I  wrote,  is  what    editors  do.  It  is,  to  repeat  myself,  “plugging  one    another  into  the  bounty  of  the  informa(on  universe.”  Readers  come  to  The  Times  not  just  for  our  original  repor(ng,  but  for  our  best  judgment  of  what  else  is    worth  reading  or  watching  out  there,  and  for  the    comments  posted  by  all  of  you.        -­‐Bill  Keller,  former  Execu1ve  Editor,  New  York  Times  
  5. 5. Linking  vs.  Aggregang    Linking:  referencing  the  materials    Aggrega(ng:  quo(ng  or  summarizing     7  
  6. 6. When  should  I  aggregate?    Your  audience  is  interested  in  the  story    To  give  a  story  context      Another  source  is  doing  an  excellent  job  repor(ng  the   story    You  don’t  have  a  reporter  on  the  scene   8  
  7. 7. What  does  aggregaon  look  like  for  us?      Source  is  named    Source  is  linked  to    Quoted  text  looks  different  (blocked  text,  colored,  italics)    Use  no  more  than  200  words,  if  relevant  –  more  likely  a   paragraph  or  a  sentence.      Keep  the  text  together  (as  it  appeared  in  the  original   story)   9  
  8. 8. Aggregated  Links   10  
  9. 9. Aggregated  Summaries   11  
  10. 10. Aggregated  Summaries   12  
  11. 11. Summary-­‐Style  Aggregaon  (Poynter)    Put  the  spotlight  on  the  news  that’s  most  relevant  to  your   audience.  Pull  out  the  informa(on  that  your  audience  will   find  most  interes(ng  and  state  it  directly.    Use  your  own  knowledge  to  include  more  context  or  link   to  related  stories.      Quote  or  summarize  only  what  is  necessary  to  describe   the  news.  This  helps  keep  you  within  the  bounds  of  fair   use  and  gives  readers  a  reason  to  visit  the  original  post.     13  
  12. 12. 1  story,  2  ways   15  
  13. 13. NYT  v.  Forbes   16  
  14. 14. PiIalls   17  
  15. 15. Quesons?    ksung@npr.org   18  

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