Innovation, e learning and higher education

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Innovation, e learning and higher education

  1. 1. ICHE 2012 : International Conference on Higher Education INNOVATION, E-LEARNING AND HIGHER EDUCATION: AN EXAMPLE OF A UNIVERSITY’ LMS ADOPTION PROCESS Ana Mafalda Gonçalves Neuza Pedro Institute of Education of the University of Lisbon Paris, France, June 2012
  2. 2. UNIVERSITY OF LISBON S E-LEARNING PROGRAM Publicizing and dissemination Support Staff training systems development Monitoring and evaluation activities Learning management system (LMS)
  3. 3. Innovation Diffusion Theory (Rogers)5 stages:1) Knowledge2) Persuasion3) Decision4) Implementation5) Confirmation
  4. 4. Objectives:• The evolutional process of growth through 3 academic years: 2008/09, 2009/10 and 2010/11 in Moodle: • Number of users (faculties + students) • Number of courses • Number of courses by scientific areas• The intensity of use, in a global perspective and in each scientific area.
  5. 5. NUMBER OF USERS REGISTERED IN MOODLE Academic Year Faculties Students 2008/2009 73 1044 2009/2010 282 3893 2010/2011 794 7999 % of Moodle users (considering UL total numbers) 2008/2009 4% 5% 2009/2010 15% 17% 2010/2011 39% 34% The platform of the UL grew (2008/09 – 2009/10) In first year of e-learning program (2010-11)
  6. 6. NUMBER OF LMS COURSES BY ACADEMIC YEAR 292% growth in two first academic years 149% growth in the first year of E-learning program
  7. 7. SCIENTIFIC AREAS GROWTH
  8. 8. INTENSITY OF USE No activity – course exists, but no actions were developed in it. Moderate activity – courses provide resources for consultation. Considerable activity – course provides resources for consultation and also interactive activities (eg. discussion foruns, wikis, assessment submission, quizzes).
  9. 9. INTENSITY OF USE – 2010/11
  10. 10. CONCLUSION• The results clearly adjust to Rogers’ distribution. Rogers’ theory helps understand and estimate the level of acceptance that can be expected in different moments in time.• The adoption of LMS in teaching practices is growing but the percentage of courses with considerable level of activity didn’t increased.• Most part of courses presented moderate levels of activity = faculties are using Moodle mostly to provide access to digital resources, not taking advantage of interactive activities.
  11. 11. CONCLUSION• Different scientific areas = different levels of involvement• A way to promote the diffusion of an innovation is to positively affect leaders opinions and to take advantage of their positive effect of having leaders as allies.• Most faculties are now in the decision stage = new efforts are needed to promote the transition of this innovation from a cognitive level to a behaviour level.
  12. 12. ICHE 2012 : International Conference on Higher Education THANK YOU Ana Mafalda Gonçalves (ana.goncalves@campus.ul.pt) Neuza Pedro (nspedro@ie.ul.pt) Institute of Education of the University of Lisbon Paris, France, June 2012

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