As We May Feel Interpreting The Culture of Emerging  Personal Affective Mobile Media PHD DEFENSE  MARTIN SØNDERLEV CHRISTE...
Overview of the Thesis <ul><li>A cultural interpretation of mobile media in a New Media context - drawing on HCI, Cultural...
<ul><li>develops a number of cases and examples to support its claims </li></ul><ul><li>It intend to illustrate: </li></ul...
<ul><li>Case studies of the historical emergence of a culture of affect in technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(e.g. the emer...
<ul><li>It argues that mobile devices bring real world experiences into a new media context offering locative and corporea...
<ul><li>It places the mobile device as a technological mediation of our experience of the world.  </li></ul><ul><li>It is ...
CULTURAL / HISTORICAL MOBILE MEDIA / MOBILE IMAGE PHENOMENOLOGICAL DESIGN DISCUSSION 1 2 3 4 MATERIAL CULTURE OF AFFECT PE...
METHOD / CRITIC Self-reflective EXCLUSIVE Interpretation ephemeral ORIGINAL Example driven promotional
MOTIVATION?
<ul><li>&quot;A memex is a device in which an individual stores all his books, records, and communications, and which is m...
<ul><li>&quot;A memex is a device in which an individual stores all his books, records, and communications, and which is m...
<ul><li>&quot;A memex is a device in which an individual stores all his books, records, and communications, and which is m...
HUMAN TECHNOLOGY RELATIONS
AFFECTIVE HCI <ul><li>“ An affective human-computer interaction is one in which  emotional information is communicated by ...
AFFECTIVE HCI <ul><li>“ An affective human-computer interaction is one in which  emotional information is communicated by ...
AFFECTIVE HCI <ul><li>“ An affective human-computer interaction is one in which  emotional information is communicated by ...
EXCITABILITY?? FUNOLOGY Blythe & Overbeeke 2005 NORMAN 2004
THE SHIFT affect as an aesthetics of cultural actions with technology   affect as an aesthetics of interaction  with techn...
MOTIVATION <ul><li>While control over the design of computer systems has increasingly been democratized, the assumption th...
MOTIVATION <ul><li>While control over the design of computer systems has increasingly been democratized, the assumption th...
MOTIVATION <ul><li>While control over the design of computer systems has increasingly been democratized, the assumption th...
MOTIVATION <ul><li>While control over the design of computer systems has increasingly been democratized, the assumption th...
AFFECT DEFINTIONS AFFECT IN COGNITION AFFECT AS CULTURE “ AFFECT” AS EXPERIENCE AFFECT IN MEDIA MASSUMI DELEUZE GROSSBERG ...
EXAMPELS THE CULTURE OF AFFECT
THE CULTURE OF EFFECIENCY IBM 1979
CULTURE OF AFFECT 1984
CULTURE OF AFFECT 2004
THE MOBILE DEVICE <ul><li>The boundaries  separating humans from their technological creations has become thinner and thin...
THE MOBILE DEVICE <ul><li>The boundaries  separating humans from their technological creations has become thinner and thin...
MIND+BODY TECHNOLOGY SOCIAL CULTURAL MOVEMENT
USERS? ilounge.com
ilounge.com
MATERIAL  CULTURE  ? ilounge.com
WHO MAKES WHO MOBILE? CYBORG? EVERDAY LIFE
TECHNOLOGICAL FORMS OF LIFE flickr.com “ Whats in your bag” group
CAPSULATION The Hood Jacket - Instructions 1. In this jacket there is a mobile phone 2. In order to answer the phone, clos...
THE MOBILE DEVICE PERSONAL AFFECTIVE MOBILE MEDIA
Personal Affective Mobile Media_  <ul><ul><li>Used for personal purposes/relations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They embed a...
“ user” driven media? <ul><li>[ T]echnology has given us a communications toolkit  that allows anyone to become a  journal...
EXAMPEL MOBILE IMAGE
MOBILE IMAGE
MOBILE IMAGE
 
MOBILE IMAGE
<ul><li>The pictures taken by American soldiers in Abu Ghraib reflect  a shift in the use made of pictures  - less objects...
<ul><li>The pictures taken by American soldiers in Abu Ghraib reflect  a shift in the use made of pictures  - less objects...
The  pictures will not go away .  That is the  nature of the digital world in which we live in .” SUSAN SONTAG 2005
IMAGES MOVE SUSAN SONTAG 2005
MOBILE IMAGE flickr.com
LOCATIVE/CORPOREAL CYBERPLACE CYBERSPACE INTERNET MOBILE image
?
 
Oneself <ul><li>  Capturing our mirror images and our shadows is  an exploration of what it means to be a subject  in an a...
Oneself I am a self. This is the first step in learning how to  express ourselves with digital technology , and the first ...
NETWORKS 1961 PAUL BARAN
A NEW MASS 2004 CHRIS ANDERSON
DIGITAL  HERMENEUTICS <ul><li>Fair warning...   </li></ul><ul><li>Put the world on notice. It's unlikely that you'll actua...
THEORY PHENOMENOLOGY OF TECHNOLOGY
<ul><li>“ Human technology relations exemplify ways in which humans – with technologies or instruments in a  mediating pos...
TOOLS VS MEDIA
EMBODIED RELATION <ul><li>[human – technology] </li></ul>   world. 
ALTERITY RELATION <ul><li>human </li></ul>   technology  [world]   
BACKGROUND RELATION <ul><li>human </li></ul>[technology – world] 
HERMENUETIC RELATION <ul><li>human </li></ul> [technology – world]      [    humans]
DESIGN RESEARCH TYPOLOGY PERSONAL AFFECTIVE MOBILE MEDIA
ATTACHMENT  AUGMENTATION AWARNESS ARTICULATION   ACTION  PAMM 5 VECTORS
<ul><ul><li>ARTICULATION </li></ul></ul>Lucid <> Ludic Information <> story Archive <> log  Transparent  <> Aesthetical  I...
<ul><li>Disembodied   <> embodied </li></ul><ul><li>Stationary   <> portable </li></ul><ul><li>Heavy    <> Light </li></ul...
<ul><li>Augmentation </li></ul>“ Brain machines”  <> “Heart Machines” Cognitive  <>   Perception Reasoning <> Emotion Ways...
WHAT I SHOULD  HAVE DONE MORE! <ul><li>Cleare scop and limitation </li></ul><ul><li>More explicit data-sets  </li></ul><ul...
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  • Defense manuscript Dear audience, Dear committee, Dear Friends, Dear Colleagues, thank you for allowing me to stand here today, I’m honored to present my work under these circumstances, and in this fora. The next hour I would like to take you on a journey that I have been on the last 3 years of doing my phD at this institution. I am there defend the written part of it. But is it all in here. NO. Therefore it is important to underline that it is also due to a process, that I have been through and this is why I would like to start by introducing, what went before this manifestation. however the product ends, but the process continues. In that context it is not always clear why and how things are shaped, formed and explained the way they are, even for the author. And perhaps that is ultimately a good thing. The process continues as I’m standing here before you to learn about my own product, to discuss and re-examine how it went about. already the committees preliminary report have highlighted for me, that most often and most importantly we learn from the process not the product. But first a little overview of what this thesis intends
  • As we may feel - PhD presentation

    1. 1. As We May Feel Interpreting The Culture of Emerging Personal Affective Mobile Media PHD DEFENSE MARTIN SØNDERLEV CHRISTENSEN ITU 29.SEP 2006
    2. 2. Overview of the Thesis <ul><li>A cultural interpretation of mobile media in a New Media context - drawing on HCI, Cultural studies, Sociology and Philosophy of technology </li></ul><ul><li>It argues that: </li></ul><ul><li>technology should be understood in terms of the cultural practices that contextualise technology </li></ul><ul><li>Technology increasingly mediation of people’s experiences of the world </li></ul>
    3. 3. <ul><li>develops a number of cases and examples to support its claims </li></ul><ul><li>It intend to illustrate: </li></ul><ul><li>affect as a central role in the relationship and experience between people and technology </li></ul><ul><li>And highlight conceptual shift from a culture of efficiency to a culture of affect in human technology studies. </li></ul>Overview of the Thesis
    4. 4. <ul><li>Case studies of the historical emergence of a culture of affect in technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(e.g. the emergence of mobile phone, iPod and camera phones); </li></ul></ul><ul><li>review literature on mobile phone use and consideration of use in the context of late modernity. </li></ul><ul><li>Investigation of how users are acting with and experiencing technology – primarily through examples from the online communities and the use of social software, weblogs, moblogs and photosharing </li></ul>Overview of the Thesis
    5. 5. <ul><li>It argues that mobile devices bring real world experiences into a new media context offering locative and corporeal embodiment of technology. </li></ul><ul><li>And investigates the emergence of a particular mobile image. </li></ul>Overview of the Thesis
    6. 6. <ul><li>It places the mobile device as a technological mediation of our experience of the world. </li></ul><ul><li>It is drawing and discussing Ihde’s phenomenology of human-technology relation in relation to mobile media technologies </li></ul><ul><li>From that it offers a conceptualizing be-with-technology. </li></ul><ul><li>It suggest that design research and practice might benefit from the conceptualization of Personal Affective Mobile Media genre developed in the thesis. </li></ul>Overview of the Thesis
    7. 7. CULTURAL / HISTORICAL MOBILE MEDIA / MOBILE IMAGE PHENOMENOLOGICAL DESIGN DISCUSSION 1 2 3 4 MATERIAL CULTURE OF AFFECT PERSONAL AFFECTIVE MOBILE MEDIA PAMM - TYPOLOGY HUMAN TECHNOLOGY RELATIONS
    8. 8. METHOD / CRITIC Self-reflective EXCLUSIVE Interpretation ephemeral ORIGINAL Example driven promotional
    9. 9. MOTIVATION?
    10. 10. <ul><li>&quot;A memex is a device in which an individual stores all his books, records, and communications, and which is mechanized so that it may be consulted with exceeding speed and flexibility. It is an enlarged intimate supplement to his memory.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>(Vannevar Bush, As We May Think 1945) </li></ul>
    11. 11. <ul><li>&quot;A memex is a device in which an individual stores all his books, records, and communications, and which is mechanized so that it may be consulted with exceeding speed and flexibility. It is an enlarged intimate supplement to his memory.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>(Vannevar Bush, As We May Think 1945) </li></ul>Martin S. Christensen “As We May Feel” 2006 MOBILE images ,music, digital
    12. 12. <ul><li>&quot;A memex is a device in which an individual stores all his books, records, and communications, and which is mechanized so that it may be consulted with exceeding speed and flexibility. It is an enlarged intimate supplement to his memory.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>(Vannevar Bush, As We May Think 1945) </li></ul>
    13. 13. HUMAN TECHNOLOGY RELATIONS
    14. 14. AFFECTIVE HCI <ul><li>“ An affective human-computer interaction is one in which emotional information is communicated by the user in a natural and comfortable way , recognized by the computer, and used to help improve the interaction. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Designing for Affective Interactions - C Reynolds, RW Picard - 9th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, 2001 </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. AFFECTIVE HCI <ul><li>“ An affective human-computer interaction is one in which emotional information is communicated by the user in a natural and comfortable way , recognized by the computer, and used to help improve the interaction. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Designing for Affective Interactions - C Reynolds, RW Picard - 9th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, 2001 </li></ul></ul>Before the computer or its designer can adapt an interaction to better serve an individual user, feedback from that user must be associated with the actions of the machine: did a specific computer action please or displease the user?
    16. 16. AFFECTIVE HCI <ul><li>“ An affective human-computer interaction is one in which emotional information is communicated by the user in a natural and comfortable way , recognized by the computer, and used to help improve the interaction. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Designing for Affective Interactions - C Reynolds, RW Picard - 9th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, 2001 </li></ul></ul>Before the computer or its designer can adapt an interaction to better serve an individual user, feedback from that user must be associated with the actions of the machine: did a specific computer action please or displease the user? <ul><ul><li>Did something in the interaction frustrate the user? One of the essential issues is sensing and recognizing the affective information communicated by the user in a way that is comfortable and reliable .” </li></ul></ul>
    17. 17. EXCITABILITY?? FUNOLOGY Blythe & Overbeeke 2005 NORMAN 2004
    18. 18. THE SHIFT affect as an aesthetics of cultural actions with technology affect as an aesthetics of interaction with technology
    19. 19. MOTIVATION <ul><li>While control over the design of computer systems has increasingly been democratized, the assumption that given systems embody a fixed, authoritative meaning has tended to persist within HCI , even as the culture of use has shifted from the workplace to our everyday lives. </li></ul>Sengers, P. Gaver. B. Designing for interpretation 2005
    20. 20. MOTIVATION <ul><li>While control over the design of computer systems has increasingly been democratized, the assumption that given systems embody a fixed, authoritative meaning has tended to persist within HCI , even as the culture of use has shifted from the workplace to our everyday lives. </li></ul>Sengers, P. Gaver. B. Designing for interpretation 2005 This move is a historical development, of course, but we believe it also represents a qualitative shift in the role and purpose of computers : as computers enter everyday life, everything changes. Most fundamentally, their purpose can no longer be expressed simply in terms of utility, efficiency and usability, and their success no longer simply evaluated along those dimensions.
    21. 21. MOTIVATION <ul><li>While control over the design of computer systems has increasingly been democratized, the assumption that given systems embody a fixed, authoritative meaning has tended to persist within HCI , even as the culture of use has shifted from the workplace to our everyday lives. </li></ul>Sengers, P. Gaver. B. Designing for interpretation 2005 This move is a historical development, of course, but we believe it also represents a qualitative shift in the role and purpose of computers : as computers enter everyday life, everything changes. Most fundamentally, their purpose can no longer be expressed simply in terms of utility, efficiency and usability, and their success no longer simply evaluated along those dimensions. Values such as enjoyment, status, aesthetics and expressivity become increasingly important, and success must be assessed along such “subjective” dimensions as well.
    22. 22. MOTIVATION <ul><li>While control over the design of computer systems has increasingly been democratized, the assumption that given systems embody a fixed, authoritative meaning has tended to persist within HCI , even as the culture of use has shifted from the workplace to our everyday lives. </li></ul>Sengers, P. Gaver. B. Designing for interpretation 2005 This move is a historical development, of course, but we believe it also represents a qualitative shift in the role and purpose of computers : as computers enter everyday life, everything changes. Most fundamentally, their purpose can no longer be expressed simply in terms of utility, efficiency and usability, and their success no longer simply evaluated along those dimensions. Values such as enjoyment, status, aesthetics and expressivity become increasingly important, and success must be assessed along such “subjective” dimensions as well. Moreover, traditional concepts of functionality founder as it becomes clear that successful systems may not be for anything in the traditional sense, but instead resources for playful exploration and curiosity-driven engagement The result is that the experience and meaning of computational systems is increasingly complex , and may be perceived and enacted in very different ways by different people in different situations .”
    23. 23. AFFECT DEFINTIONS AFFECT IN COGNITION AFFECT AS CULTURE “ AFFECT” AS EXPERIENCE AFFECT IN MEDIA MASSUMI DELEUZE GROSSBERG MERLEAU-PONTY FORGAS DAMASIO NORMAN PICARD DON IDHE GROSSBERG BURNETT
    24. 24. EXAMPELS THE CULTURE OF AFFECT
    25. 25. THE CULTURE OF EFFECIENCY IBM 1979
    26. 26. CULTURE OF AFFECT 1984
    27. 27. CULTURE OF AFFECT 2004
    28. 28. THE MOBILE DEVICE <ul><li>The boundaries separating humans from their technological creations has become thinner and thinner. There is no better example of this than the cell phones. […] as cell phones mutate into Personal Digital Assistance [PDA’s], video cameras and game consoles, their use shifts the expectations that consumers have about human interaction and the communication process. Machines become the focus of a series of shared relationships that link technology to human need and vice versa. </li></ul>
    29. 29. THE MOBILE DEVICE <ul><li>The boundaries separating humans from their technological creations has become thinner and thinner. There is no better example of this than the cell phones. […] as cell phones mutate into Personal Digital Assistance [PDA’s], video cameras and game consoles, their use shifts the expectations that consumers have about human interaction and the communication process. Machines become the focus of a series of shared relationships that link technology to human need and vice versa. </li></ul>This means that the newer technologies of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries are no longer just extensions of human abilities and needs; they are enlarging cultural and social preconceptions of the relationships between body and mind. [Burnett: How images think 2004:XIX]
    30. 30. MIND+BODY TECHNOLOGY SOCIAL CULTURAL MOVEMENT
    31. 31. USERS? ilounge.com
    32. 32. ilounge.com
    33. 33. MATERIAL CULTURE ? ilounge.com
    34. 34. WHO MAKES WHO MOBILE? CYBORG? EVERDAY LIFE
    35. 35. TECHNOLOGICAL FORMS OF LIFE flickr.com “ Whats in your bag” group
    36. 36. CAPSULATION The Hood Jacket - Instructions 1. In this jacket there is a mobile phone 2. In order to answer the phone, close the hood completely 3. The phone call continues, as long as you don't try to open the hood. [Courtesy: Mass Distraction – www.mass-disstraction.org] MASS DISTRACTION
    37. 37. THE MOBILE DEVICE PERSONAL AFFECTIVE MOBILE MEDIA
    38. 38. Personal Affective Mobile Media_ <ul><ul><li>Used for personal purposes/relations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They embed and “prompt” affect. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They are mobile/they move </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Allow for mediation/ </li></ul></ul>P A M M
    39. 39. “ user” driven media? <ul><li>[ T]echnology has given us a communications toolkit that allows anyone to become a journalist at little cost and, in theory, with global reach. Nothing like this has ever been remotely possible before.” </li></ul><ul><li>[Dan Gillmore we the media 2004:XVII] </li></ul>
    40. 40. EXAMPEL MOBILE IMAGE
    41. 41. MOBILE IMAGE
    42. 42. MOBILE IMAGE
    43. 44. MOBILE IMAGE
    44. 45. <ul><li>The pictures taken by American soldiers in Abu Ghraib reflect a shift in the use made of pictures - less objects to be saved than evanescent messages to be disseminated, circulated. </li></ul>SUSAN SONTAG 2005
    45. 46. <ul><li>The pictures taken by American soldiers in Abu Ghraib reflect a shift in the use made of pictures - less objects to be saved than evanescent messages to be disseminated, circulated. </li></ul>A digital camera is a common possession of most soldiers. Where once photographing war was the province of photojournalists, now the soldiers themselves are all photographers - recording their war, their fun, their observations of what they find picturesque, their atrocities - and swapping images among themselves, and emailing them around the globe. SUSAN SONTAG 2005
    46. 47. The pictures will not go away . That is the nature of the digital world in which we live in .” SUSAN SONTAG 2005
    47. 48. IMAGES MOVE SUSAN SONTAG 2005
    48. 49. MOBILE IMAGE flickr.com
    49. 50. LOCATIVE/CORPOREAL CYBERPLACE CYBERSPACE INTERNET MOBILE image
    50. 51. ?
    51. 53. Oneself <ul><li> Capturing our mirror images and our shadows is an exploration of what it means to be a subject in an age where masses no longer exist. Perhaps our fascination with self-portraits in mirrors is an expression of our collective coming into being as digital subjects . […] </li></ul>Walker, Jill, Mirrors and Shadows: The Digital Aestheticisation of Oneself. In proceedings of Digital Arts and Culture, Pages 184-190.
    52. 54. Oneself I am a self. This is the first step in learning how to express ourselves with digital technology , and the first step in choosing to express ourselves rather than simply allowing ourselves to be described by others Walker, Jill, Mirrors and Shadows: The Digital Aestheticisation of Oneself. In proceedings of Digital Arts and Culture, Pages 184-190.
    53. 55. NETWORKS 1961 PAUL BARAN
    54. 56. A NEW MASS 2004 CHRIS ANDERSON
    55. 57. DIGITAL HERMENEUTICS <ul><li>Fair warning... </li></ul><ul><li>Put the world on notice. It's unlikely that you'll actually see anyone overtly change their behavior lest they be blogged, but you'll certainly shake up a paranoid few. </li></ul>
    56. 58. THEORY PHENOMENOLOGY OF TECHNOLOGY
    57. 59. <ul><li>“ Human technology relations exemplify ways in which humans – with technologies or instruments in a mediating position – experience an environment or world in a new or technological way […] </li></ul>technologies are non-neutral in the human context function like forms of life or worlds, although in different ways with different technologies, transform human experience . [Ihde 1993:112]
    58. 60. TOOLS VS MEDIA
    59. 61. EMBODIED RELATION <ul><li>[human – technology] </li></ul> world. 
    60. 62. ALTERITY RELATION <ul><li>human </li></ul> technology [world] 
    61. 63. BACKGROUND RELATION <ul><li>human </li></ul>[technology – world] 
    62. 64. HERMENUETIC RELATION <ul><li>human </li></ul> [technology – world]  [  humans]
    63. 65. DESIGN RESEARCH TYPOLOGY PERSONAL AFFECTIVE MOBILE MEDIA
    64. 66. ATTACHMENT AUGMENTATION AWARNESS ARTICULATION ACTION PAMM 5 VECTORS
    65. 67. <ul><ul><li>ARTICULATION </li></ul></ul>Lucid <> Ludic Information <> story Archive <> log Transparent <> Aesthetical Information <> chronicling Word processing <> narrative Goal oriented <> open-ended Direct <> circulation Decisive <> Suggestive Commands <> Conversations Controlled <> Flourishing
    66. 68. <ul><li>Disembodied <> embodied </li></ul><ul><li>Stationary <> portable </li></ul><ul><li>Heavy <> Light </li></ul><ul><li>Functional <> Mediating </li></ul><ul><li>Tool/instrument <> Gadget/medium </li></ul><ul><li>Useful <> Exciting </li></ul><ul><li>Discrete <> personal </li></ul><ul><li>Detached <> Affectionate </li></ul><ul><li>On/off <> Enduring </li></ul>ATTACHMENT
    67. 69. <ul><li>Augmentation </li></ul>“ Brain machines” <> “Heart Machines” Cognitive <> Perception Reasoning <> Emotion Ways of Working <> Ways of living Desktop/office <> Urban space Interaction <> [inter] action Occupation <> habitation Immobility <> mobility
    68. 70. WHAT I SHOULD HAVE DONE MORE! <ul><li>Cleare scop and limitation </li></ul><ul><li>More explicit data-sets </li></ul><ul><li>Better structured empirical work </li></ul><ul><li>More analysis across demographics </li></ul><ul><li>More examples across cultures </li></ul><ul><li>More direct adress to design </li></ul><ul><li>” Better” interpretations </li></ul>

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