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Especial de Idiomas. Diario Estrategia 2007
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Gmat Idiomatic Expressions

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GMAT sentence correction section will test you against a number of different English language issues. One of them is what is called "idiomatic expressions", also labeled in some textbooks as "Idioms" (do not confuse with what in general English is understood by an "idiom" (ex: "once in a blue moon) GMAT sees it as the proper combination of verbs/adjectives/nouns + preposition(s)

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Gmat Idiomatic Expressions

  1. 1. Check usage by searching  these idiomatic  expresions in the  following sites:  WordNet 3.0  http://wordnet.princeton.edu  /  Oxford Collocations Dictionary  http://llohe­ocd.appspot.com/  Links provided by Nova  Language Consultants &  accessed Oct 2010; list  shared by a Nova Student  Corpus of Contemporary  American English (click on  enter)  http://wordnet.princeton.edu  /  Just the word  http://193.133.140.102/justTheWord  able to  based on  date from  hypothesize that  mistake for  prejudiced against  [the] same as  ability to  because of  deal with  in contrast to  model after  permit to  see as  accede to  believe to be  debate over  in danger of  more than  persuade to  send to  according to  between [a] and [b]  decide to / against  in order to  move away from  predisposed to  sense of so…that  account for  call for  defend against  in violation of  meet with  pressure to  spend on  accuse of  craving for  define as  inclined to  meet  prevent from  subject to  acquaint with  choice of  delighted by  infected with  [a] native of  prized by  substitute [a] for [b]  agree with  choose from  demonstrate that  instead of  native to  prohibit from  suffer from  allow for  choose to  depend on  introduce to  neither…nor  protect against  superior to  amount to  claim to  depict as  isolate from  not [a] but [b]  provide with  supplant by  appear to  collaborate with  descend from  intent to  not only…but also  preferable to  suspicious of  apply to  conclude that  different from  in search of  not so much…as  prior to  sympathy for  argue over  consequence of  difficult to  inside  necessity of  partake of  sympathize with  as __ as  consider  distinguish [a] from [b]  just as…so too  necessity for  practice for  separate from  associate with  consistent with  draw on  less than  name  practice to  target at  assure that  continue to  due to  likely to  on account of  practice of  think of (someone or something) as  at a disadvantage  contrast with  desirous of  liken to  opportunity for  question whether  threaten to  attempt to  contribute to  divergent from  opportunity to  range from [a] to [b]  train to  attend to  convert to  decide on  opposed to  rather than  transit to  attention to  cost to/of  [in an] effort to  opposite of  regard as  try to  attest to  credit with  either…or  ought to  replace with  type of  attribute to  comply with  enamored with  require to  tamper with  available to  conform to  encourage to  required of  tie to  afflicted with  consider to be  estimate to be  [the] responsibility to  try to  argue with  composed of  expose to  responsible for  tend  averse to  compare with/to  extend to  result from  tend to  ask of  consist in  extent of  result in  use as  agree to  consist with  equal  rule that  [the] use of  angry at  consist of  equal to  result of  view as  correspond to  fear that  vote for  correspond with  fluctuations in  visit  forbid to  willing to  force to  worry about  frequency of  from [a] to [b]  fail in  GMAT PARTIAL WORD LIST OF IDIOMATIC EXPRESSIONS

GMAT sentence correction section will test you against a number of different English language issues. One of them is what is called "idiomatic expressions", also labeled in some textbooks as "Idioms" (do not confuse with what in general English is understood by an "idiom" (ex: "once in a blue moon) GMAT sees it as the proper combination of verbs/adjectives/nouns + preposition(s)

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