Proposal for Professional Development Workshop #15279Title: Bridging the Divides between Academics, Practice, and Policy i...
Proposal for Professional Development Workshop #15279Bridging the Divides between Academics, Practice, and Policy in Entre...
Proposal for Professional Development Workshop #15279          Having participated in over 25 academic conferences between...
Proposal for Professional Development Workshop #15279entrepreneurship as it speaks to our (in)ability to share knowledge p...
Proposal for Professional Development Workshop #15279   8. Dr. William Guth, NYU, Fellow of Strategic Management Society a...
Proposal for Professional Development Workshop #15279Sponsor RationalesWhy AAT?We have a unique opportunity to question bo...
Proposal for Professional Development Workshop #15279insight plus a couple of new projects (and a couple of new friendship...
Proposal for Professional Development Workshop #15279Format of Workshop:       This workshop is not intended as an academi...
Proposal for Professional Development Workshop #15279and, if necessary, identify the best non-redundant projects. (We will...
Proposal for Professional Development Workshop #15279Conclusion:       Despite the rapid growth experienced by the academi...
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Bridging the Divides between Academe, Policy & Practice

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Proposed workshop for the 2013 Academy of Management conference: Bringing together a powerful array of experts on how to better connect the Ivory Tower with the entrepreneurial community (and both with policy makers). Action-oriented: In Startup Weekend style, ideas for bridging projects get pitched, teams are formed and projects get hacked, then reported back

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Bridging the Divides between Academe, Policy & Practice

  1. 1. Proposal for Professional Development Workshop #15279Title: Bridging the Divides between Academics, Practice, and Policy in EntrepreneurshipPrimary Sponsor: All-Academy Theme (AAT)Potential Co-sponsors: Practice Theme Committee (PTC); Entrepreneurship (ENT); TeachingTheme Committee (TTC); Technology and Innovation Management (TIM). Also: Academy ofManagement Strategic Doing InitiativeBridging the Divides between Academics, Practice, and Policy in Entrepreneurship Organizers [full list below]:Dr. Suresh Kumar, CEO, Green Earth LLC; University of Phoenix, NJDr. Norris F. Krueger, Jr., Entrepreneurship Northwest/College of Western Idaho.Dr. Fedor Ovchinnikov, Entrepreneurship Division Practitioner InitiativeAbstract:Academic and practitioner groups in the field of entrepreneurship hold large annual conferencesbut rarely interact effectively. Barring a few exceptions, there is very little by way of strategicpartnerships between academic and practitioner organizations that tie in practice, research,education, advocacy and policy in meaningful ways. While there may not be a one size fits allsolution, it is critical for academic and practitioner organizations and their individual members toexplore avenues for collaboration to find out what works and what does not. This participatoryworkshop conducted by practitioner-researchers discusses practical and innovative strategies thathave worked. This workshop is not an academic exercise - rather, it will feature a series ofvignettes by expert entrepreneurs, researchers, consultants, and leaders of not-for-profitorganizations that showcases academic-practice bridging strategies that have worked in the fieldof entrepreneurship education. This workshop will highlight – and develop - innovative ideasthat can help bridge the divide and identify common ground between education and practice. Forexample, a recurring theme will be how we can use educational tools to help practitioners andacademics to better learn from each other. The objective of this workshop is to share knowledgeand help participants build upon it and thereby help make education and research more relevantto practice. We encourage participants not just to showcase best practices but also to reflectupon the challenges faced, how innovative solutions were crafted, why the strategy has been soeffective, and how the experiences were leveraged to bridge learning and practice. 1
  2. 2. Proposal for Professional Development Workshop #15279Bridging the Divides between Academics, Practice, and Policy in Entrepreneurship [or... “Questioning Capitalism AND the Ivory Tower?”]Overview of Workshop At the 2012 Academy of Management conference, we had ~100 attendees from all overthe Academy join us for a rousing discussion of what was working. Rather than focus on thenegatives, our presenters and audience members kept the focus squarely on the opportunities. The leaders of this workshop, one a well known researcher (and recovering techentrepreneur) and the other a serial entrepreneur now entering the groves of Academe, have overthe years experienced multiple disconnects between academics and practice in the field ofentrepreneurship. Many major academic organizations such as Academy of Management,International Council of Small Business, and the United States Association of Small Businessand Entrepreneurship; as well as organizations that represent practitioners such as the UnitedStates Chamber of Commerce, Inc. Magazine, and The Indus Entrepreneur (TIE) conduct largeannual conferences for their members. Our experience attending many of the events has beenthat, barring a few exceptions, there is very little by way of strategic dialogue and sustainablepartnerships between academic and practitioner organizations that tie in practice, research,education, advocacy and policy in meaningful ways. We have found that organizations charged with fostering the practice and education ofentrepreneurship, at least for the most part, operate in silos that separate entrepreneurs fromeducators and researchers. For example, academic conferences that are focused onentrepreneurship organized by USASBE and ICSB are attended just by a handful of practicingentrepreneurs, usually those who have a recent success story and have been invited to speak. Weattribute the following as among the reasons for this disconnect (a) there is hardly any outreachby the organizers of academic conferences to practitioners, (b) practicing entrepreneurs havebusy schedules and select events where they can get proven and practical ideas that couldaddress their immediate concerns and can be applied to their businesses, not abstract researchfinding, and (c) entrepreneurs and the organization that represent them often lack the training tofind and see the relevance in academic research that could contribute to better decision-making(Davidsson, 2011). 2
  3. 3. Proposal for Professional Development Workshop #15279 Having participated in over 25 academic conferences between us, we can testify thatthere are plenty of excellent mentoring and learning opportunities for researchers at academicconferences such as doctoral consortiums and workshops. However, the value proposition forpractitioners at academic conferences is not the same. For the majority of the papers presented atacademic conferences the practical applicability is suspect. We echo the arguments made byWilliam Bygrave (2007), as the primary reasons for this problem: (a) use of improper datasets,widespread use of secondary data, research models based on weak theory, research questions thatare of little relevance to the world of practice, and use of esoteric quantitative techniques that isfor the most part far removed from the reality of what actually happens inside the complex andchaotic world of start-up‟s. According to Dale Meyer (2011), the academic field ofentrepreneurship is “stalled” due the use of econometric methodologies and secondary databasesthat “distance researchers from actual people and behaviors that catalyze entrepreneurs andentrepreneurship” (p. 7). On the practitioner organization side, over the years, between us we have attended over20 events and annual conferences such as the Americas Small Business Summit organized by theUS Chamber of Commerce, Tie-con of TIE, and the annual Inc. 500/5000 Conference by Inc.magazine. At each of these events we were hard pressed to find experts from research andacademia. We argue that among of the key reasons for this missed opportunity are the following:(a) there is hardly any outreach by practitioner organizations to the entrepreneurship educatorsand researchers, (b) majority of the organizations representing practitioners stick with a narrowagenda that is designed get the immediate attention of their membership at the cost of addressinglong term systemic issues that are supported and validated by painstaking research, (c)educational institutions do not give tenure credit to researcher who conduct workshops, doresearch, or speak at non-academic conferences, (d) universities and business schools do notreimburse researchers the fee and expenses for non-academic conferences (Kumar, 2011). Theirony is that practitioner conferences are attended by large numbers of entrepreneurs and has thepotential to be rich sources of collection of raw data and can serve as excellent testing labs fortheory. Our principal concern is that the disconnects discussed above could stall the progress ofboth academics and practice, especially in an applied field such as entrepreneurship that manyexperts believe is still in its infancy (Bygrave, 2007). However, this applies far beyond 3
  4. 4. Proposal for Professional Development Workshop #15279entrepreneurship as it speaks to our (in)ability to share knowledge productively. For example, weknow that much of the focus will be on learning, whether sharing scholarly knowledge that hasactual-but-unrecognized practical value or deploying technology such as the MOOC. The principal objective of the proposed workshop is to share practical strategies that havebeen used by both academicians and practitioners and the organizations that represent them toeffectively bridge the gaps discussed above. While we realize that may not be a one size fits allsolution, we believe that it is critical for academic and practitioner organizations and theirindividual members to explore avenues for collaboration to share best practices on what hadworked. This participatory workshop conducted by practitioner-researchers will discussespractical strategies that can help make education and research relevant to practice.List of Confirmed and Invited SpeakersSpeakers/Presenters 1. Dr. Norris Krueger, External Fellow, Max Planck Institute of Economics/ Entrepreneurship Northwest, ID. Consultant, College of Western Idaho (Organizer) 2. Dr. Suresh Kumar, Founder and CEO, NexAge Technologies USA and Green Earth LLC, 4 time INC 500 entrepreneur, and Adjunct Faculty, University of Phoenix, NJ (Organizer) 3. Dr. Fedor Ovichinnsky, entrepreneur, Entrepreneurship Division Practitioner Initiative.Speakers/Presenters/Discussants/Team Mentors 4. Dr. Donna Kelley, Professor of Entrepreneurship, Babson College, MA; expert on the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (academic-policy bridge) 5. Dr. Andrew Maxwell, Director of Canadian Innovation Centre, Temple University, founder of VentureStart (premier online technology entrepreneurship training to practitioners) 6. Ms. Lesley Hayes, Entrepreneurs Organization (EO) lead global entrepreneurship trainer, PhD student in entrepreneurship; EO is actively seeking to bridge to academe. 7. Dr. David Croson, immediate past program officer, National Science Foundation SCI-SIP initiative, including practitioner-friendly research; professor at SMU; educational entrepreneur 4
  5. 5. Proposal for Professional Development Workshop #15279 8. Dr. William Guth, NYU, Fellow of Strategic Management Society and leading consultant on deep strategic change 9. Dr. Usha Haley, Asia-Pacific Centre, Massey University, New Zealand 10. Dr. Kuo Frank Yu, City University of Hong Kong 11. Dr. Kathryn Goldman Schuyler, Alliant University 12. Prof. Thiago de Carvalho, entrepreneur and entrepreneurship PhD student, editor of Entrepreneurship Division Newsletter, Brazil 13. Dr. Thomas Mierzwa, Professor, Graduate School of Management and Technology, University of Maryland, Adelphi, MD, presenter at 2012 PDW 14. Dr. Robert D‟Intino, Professor of Entrepreneurship, Rowan University, NJ, veteran of the 2012 PDW, expert on education (e.g., MOOCs) 15. Mr. William Dennis, NFIB Research Foundation, expert on policy-academe-practitioner linkages, global speaker on this topic Invited Discussion Provocateurs [may participate via video] 16. Mr. Tom Park, CTO of the United States (joint practitioner-academe-government projects) 17. Ms. Leah Nichols, AAAS/NSF project on Startup Weekend-style public policy development using entrepreneurs and academics 18. Mr. Franck Nouyrigat, co-founder of Startup Weekend, director of Startup Weekend Research. 19. Thom Ruhe, Vice-President, Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation 20. Vivek Wadhwa, Duke/Berkeley/Kauffman Foundation, practitioner research on key policy issuesWe also acknowledge the invaluable advice & assistance of Per Davidsson (QUT), past chair ofENT and a true pioneer at gap-bridging and Dr. Tyrone Pitsis (University of Newcastle,Academy of Management Strategic Doing Initiative) who nudged us “gently” toward AATsubmission. 5
  6. 6. Proposal for Professional Development Workshop #15279Sponsor RationalesWhy AAT?We have a unique opportunity to question both „capitalism‟ and the Ivory Tower.Entrepreneurship itself is a different way to look at organizing economic activity as it focuses oncreating and delivering value to key stakeholders. Certainly entrepreneurs play an increasing roleis solving society‟s problems and certainly interest in entrepreneurship has exploded inuniversities. However… there remain huge disconnects that need to be addressed. But we canbridge these divides in ways that benefit far more than just “us”.We bring together here a remarkable group of the very best at bridging these divides. (They alsorepresent membership in almost every Division and represent public, private and nonprofitworlds.) We had a big turnout last year for our „beta test‟ without marketing. Judging by reactionto this draft, we anticipate even more buzz.Equally important, we developed an action-oriented format where audience members will playmeaningful roles and have great takeaways (see proposal) plus personal action items that willbenefit their universities, their communities and the Academy of Management as a whole.Why PTC?Sponsored a successful version of this workshop in 2012 (~100 attendees with no marketing)where presenters shared several examples where the divide between Academe and practice werebridged successfully. More important, the vigorous audience participation yielded considerableinsight plus a couple of new projects (and a couple of new friendships!)Why ENT?Co-championed last year‟s PDW and had the highest representation among attendees. As noted,a successful version of this workshop in 2012 (~100 attendees with no marketing) offeredpresenters who shared several examples where the divide between Academe and practice werebridged successfully. More important, the vigorous audience participation yielded considerable 6
  7. 7. Proposal for Professional Development Workshop #15279insight plus a couple of new projects (and a couple of new friendships!) One co-chair leads theDivision‟s project to increase engagement with practitioner, a discussant chairs the Division‟sNonTraditional Academics committee, and we include multiple former Division officers.Why Strategic Doing Initiative?The creation of this new AoM initative further validates that we are on the right track but it alsotells us that we have much more to do and need to reach out even more broadly. We have hadconsiderable invaluable advice on this project from the Strategic Doing team, including TyronePitsis as a co-chair.Why TIM?Last year‟s successful PDW on this topic included significant (and visible) participation by TIMmembers. Also, technology played a critical role in several of the 2012 examplars and will beeven more prominent in 2013.Why TTC?A successful version of this workshop in 2012 (~100 attendees with no marketing) wherepresenters shared several examples where the divide between Academe and practice werebridged successfully. Two of them were teaching-related and educational projects are even moreprominent this year (developing MOOCs). 7
  8. 8. Proposal for Professional Development Workshop #15279Format of Workshop: This workshop is not intended as an academic exercise - rather, it will move beyond theusual „talking heads‟ presentation-and-discussion format toward initiating strategic actions thataddress different facets of the divide. We will not just discuss best practices but also to reflectupon the challenges faced, the processes used to arrive at solutions, why the strategy has been soeffective, and how the experiences were leveraged to enhance learning and practice. More important, we learned from last year that we do not want to engage the talents ofthe audience, we want to *immerse* them in this bridging process. To that end, we propose the following: 1) Introductions and overview [short] 2) Some initial examples of highly successful bridgings to prime the pump 3) We then move into hackathon mode (think Startup Weekend model): a. 10-15 elevator pitches* from the panel & audience alike of 60-90 seconds b. Form teams around the „best‟ ideas c. PDW organizers and discussants serve as mentors, as needed for each team. 4) Scrum-style, teams spend 30-60 minutes developing a strategic or tactical proposal for bridging one particular gap, complete with immediate action items and commitment for action by each team member. 5) The teams then report back to the PDW with their proposal where we look for ways for the various projects to collaborate (and, if possible, where the various sponsors and friends of the PDW such as the Divisions can assist.) 6) Post-PDW, the co-organizers will create a comprehensive report of all the proposals and action items. They will also assist in following up with the promised action items. Sections 1 & 2: No more than 30 minutes [the schedule depends on total time] Section 3: 20-30 minutes Section 4: 30-75 minutes Section 5: 15-20 minutes. [we will likely need 2 hours but if we get sizeable attendance, 3 hours would be invaluable; as you can see, this is scalable from ~90 minutes to 180 minutes]We could easily generate 10+ excellent proposal ideas from the participants, however, we reallywant to offer opportunities to the audience as well. To that end, we will solicit ideas in advance 8
  9. 9. Proposal for Professional Development Workshop #15279and, if necessary, identify the best non-redundant projects. (We will encourage but not requirepre-registration.) Given proof of concept from 2012, we feel comfortable to market this PDWvigorously.Audience TakeawaysPre-registrants (and others, as feasible) will get to see the broad array of opportunities arisingfrom the bridging of the gaps between Academe, policy and practice… from bridging academics,policy experts and entrepreneurs.This will be a very human process – we are bringing together a diverse range of talented,passionate individuals who are working at this interface, both on the PDW and in its audience.Attendees will get to know some amazing people who are eager to pursue tangible, productiveprojects. (Yes, even research!)This is intended to be part of a much broader effort in Academe to move this forward (e.g.,Divisional efforts like ENT‟s Practitioner effort and Academy-wide efforts like the StrategicDoing Initiative). Attendees will be able to join the „crusade‟ – a community of practice thatextends well beyond a few PDWs.Audience members will take away a deeper insight in how and why to use these tools and weanticipate that the experiential learning will provide specific insights for their own critical issues.Audience members will also see the remarkable array of research issues that can be uniquelyaddressed at the intersection of business modeling and social/sustainable entrepreneurship.We also hope to build a community of practice around all this; this must not be a one-off event(no matter how much fun we will be having).Finally, each breakout group is drafting an actionable proposal for moving forward with specificaction items that each participant will publicly commit to. 9
  10. 10. Proposal for Professional Development Workshop #15279Conclusion: Despite the rapid growth experienced by the academic field of entrepreneurship and thepractice of entrepreneurship as two distinct endeavors, the challenges faced at their intersectionare deep and multifaceted. Given that the end goals of organizations, regardless of academic orpractitioner focused, are more or less similar, organizational leaders have the responsibility toensure greater collaboration. While we realize there may not be a one size fits all solution, it iscritical for academic and practitioner organizations and their individual members to exploreavenues for collaboration to find out what works and what does not. This professionaldevelopment workshop is an attempt to share knowledge and find common grounds betweenacademic and practice. 10

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