Film magazine reviews research

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Film magazine reviews research

  1. 1. Film Magazine reviews research.
  2. 2. What I was able to find for my research I went to my local shop and was able to find these two magazines, total film and empire film magazine. These two of Brittan's most popular magazines.
  3. 3. Total Film is a British film magazine published 13 times a year (every four weeks) by Future Publishing. The magazine was launched in 1997 and offers film, DVD and Blu-ray news, reviews and features. It is one of the largest circulation English-speaking film magazines in the world. Guest editors have included Peter Jackson, Kevin Smith, and Ricky Gervais and Stephen Merchant. ABOUT
  4. 4. Comparing the two:Comparing the two: Like many film magazines, as well as print they also have online versions, some other film magazines are solely based on the internet however. As you can see total film is no different. On the left hand side is the print magazine version the other one is the inline version. Although they are for the same magazine they have different layouts.
  5. 5. AboutAbout Empire is a British film magazine published monthly by Bauer Consumer Media. From the first issue in July 1989, the magazine was edited by Barry McIlheney and published by Emap. Bauer purchased Emap Consumer Media in early 2008. It is the biggest selling film magazine in Britain, consistently outselling its nearest market rival total Film and is also published in Australia, Turkey and Russia. Empire organizes the annual Empire Awards which were sponsored by Sony Ericsson until 2009 and are now sponsored by Jameson The awards are voted for by readers of the magazine. 1989 cover1989 cover
  6. 6. Comparing the two:Comparing the two: The is the same case for this magazine the layouts are different, this is because the online magazine and the print one have different features. The inline one has related items and advert banners as well as opportunities to share the article on social networking sites, as well as allowing, readers to leave their own comments.
  7. 7. Language used in total film review magazine ‘Put Melville's Le Samourai, Bertolucci’s The Conformist and Antonioni’s The Passenger into a big movie blender and you get The American, a stylish throwback to the existential crime thrillers of the ’70s.’ The language in this beginning sentence is very creative and kind of comedic, and , introducing the film review by comparing it to a mixture of two other well known films.
  8. 8. Put Melville's Le Samourai, Bertolucci’s The Conformist and Antonioni’s The Passenger into a big movie blender and you get The American, a stylish throwback to the existential crime thrillers of the ’70s. Directed by Anton Corbijn (Control), it’s a thoughtful, solemn character study that casts a mesmeric spell. Until the end, that is, when – instead of delivering the dramatic climax we have been led to expect – it takes an abrupt nose-dive into laughable pretentiousness. Clooney is Jack, a melancholy hitman who – having survived an assassination attempt in snowy Sweden – takes refuge amid the cobbled streets and medieval architecture of Abruzzo, Italy. Befriended by a philosophical priest (Paolo Bonacelli) and serviced by a kindly hooker (Violante Placido), he starts to contemplate a change of career. But when he’s called upon to build a rifle for another killer (Thekla Reuten), it becomes clear his old life will be harder to walk away from than he imagines. Language here is basically just explaining the story , very descriptive, and formal, however not to the point of queens English but far from slang, which makes it seem like a an adult kind of magazine.
  9. 9. There’s an admirable conviction to the film’s austerity and formality, and it’s courageous of the Cloone- meister to so rigidly suppress his natural charm. But the overall lack of humor practically dares the audience to provide their own. Verdict: Corbijn’s bold stab at reviving the minimalism and mystery of ’70s cinema has its strengths but ultimately overreaches itself. Closer to Michael Clayton than Ocean’s Eleven, it’ll leave Clooney fans divided. The final paragraph is an small overall view of the film, and describing the characters feel which is given to the audience. Here we can see that the film is more serious than comedic. This last verdict, this is solely the writer of the article s opinion, and what they think about the attempt of the film, still here language remains quiet formal.
  10. 10. Language used in empire film magazine. Repetition can smother a point, as well as underscore it. The American opens on an image — beautiful, elegant — and closes on a variant of it. The world turns — nature is implacable. So, now you know. Compared to the other one the introduction paragraph is mores descriptive of the film immediately, rather than bringing a little bit of opinion
  11. 11. The second feature from acclaimed photographer Anton Corbijn is concerned with existential issues: chewy and important. It is also — like his debut, Control — about a lost soul. And is quite unlike what many will expect from an assassination thriller starring George Clooney. Though for a bloke who comes over as carefree in interviews, Clooney has made an awful lot of movies about mid-life crises, hinging on heroes who may have cause to regret their emotions: Solaris, Syriana, The Good German, Michael Clayton, Up In The Air and more. So, the big questions come: Is it safe to feel? Can love redeem? How much time is Violante Placido going to spend starkers? It’s not only her that’s exposed. And the thing about subtext is, really, it needs to be under something. The American may not have a lot of dialogue, but it sure has a lot of ‘text’. The. Words. Carry. Meaning. Every. One. Of. Them. This may seem like a knock on Rowan Joffe’s screenplay (adapted from Martin Booth’s novel A Very Private Gentleman), but it could say as much or more about the director’s decision to shoot in a moody, meditative manner — and cast characterful Euro faces who deliver dialogue as if it were carved in stone. Amid the motion-sick pandemonium of a Bourne — or with more verbally dextrous performers — the conversations might not have felt so self- consciously weighty. But Corbijn enjoys silence and master shots — the slow-build over the whizz- bang. There are some terrific scenes — the shocking snow-bound opening, the tense car-park face-off — but having a café TV play Once Upon A Time In The West invites dangerous comparisons. The American definitely doesn’t have Sergio Leone’s sense of fun. . Description of actors past films, and his performance in the movie Less description of the film but more about the feel of the film and the things it involves, this is good as someone wouldn’t want to watch a film, if they can find out everything about it just by reading this article.
  12. 12. From what I have read I have found out that a good article must include: *a good opening introduction. The style of this does however varies as we have seen depending on the style of the writer. *ratings of the film, as well as a key above explaining the rating system for example: * The release date of the film: This was taken fromThis was taken from empire magazines,empire magazines, review pagereview page This falls under film details, and this includes things like the release date the director and the running time
  13. 13. • Film magazines also include other features such as : • Buzz off the week • Games and competitions • The big screen • And other things depending on the type of magazine.
  14. 14. I have decided after my research to do a review for total film magazine. This is because the style of writing appeals to me and from previous research I have found out that they review more than just mainstream films, and also focuses of small productions from around the world. the type of film we are making, (a small budget, silent film,) I think this magazine would be idea for our film review. It is one of the largest circulation English-speaking film magazines in the world, which means more coverage for our film. What have I decided?

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