Voting
First Past the Post Won a seat for the labour party in Barnsley 50 votes Labour 30 Liberal Democrats 10 Conservative Won a...
Proportional Representation (Used in Scotland and Wales) Barnsley 50 votes Labour 30 Liberal Democrats 10 Conservative She...
First-past the post.   Most areas have Labour (red) won seats so the National government will be Labour because they will ...
Sorry not a brilliant map with half of Scotland missing. Proportional representation (System used in Scotland and Wales) E...
Proportional Representation &  Constituencies Arguments for and against..
In favour of proportional representation <ul><li>It means the wishes of the voters are respected. </li></ul><ul><li>For ex...
Arguments against proportional representation. <ul><li>It means MP’s will not represent a particular group of people, they...
Arguments in favour of constituencies… <ul><li>MP represents a particular local group of people and can be contacted direc...
Arguments against constituencies.. <ul><li>They allow people to be elected when most voters don’t want them. </li></ul><ul...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Voting

1,080 views

Published on

Published in: News & Politics
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,080
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
45
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Voting

  1. 1. Voting
  2. 2. First Past the Post Won a seat for the labour party in Barnsley 50 votes Labour 30 Liberal Democrats 10 Conservative Won a seat for the labour party in Sheffield 56 votes Labour 10 Green Party 40 Other Won a seat for Green party in Leeds 116 votes for Green Party. 5 votes Labour 16 votes other The National Government would be Labour. However Leeds would be run by the Green party as the local winning party. They can enforce certain policies to do with recycling and refuge collection etc. Local people can befit from a party they want representing their views.
  3. 3. Proportional Representation (Used in Scotland and Wales) Barnsley 50 votes Labour 30 Liberal Democrats 10 Conservative Sheffield 56 votes Labour 10 Green Party 40 Other Leeds 116 votes for Green Party 5 votes Labour 16 votes other The National and local Government would be Green Party. By adding all the votes the Green Party have the majority of votes – even though in Barnsley no one voted Green Party and only 10 people voted form them in Sheffield.
  4. 4. First-past the post. Most areas have Labour (red) won seats so the National government will be Labour because they will have more members of parliament. Problem – This voting system doesn’t count the number of votes the party gets eg only 100 people may have voted in Yorkshire but the majority was for Labour so Labour won. However in Sussex 8,000 people voted. In theory more people voted Conservative but Labour has more councillors elected. Good point Local people can have a party they think understand their needs. This local party can run independently from the National Government.
  5. 5. Sorry not a brilliant map with half of Scotland missing. Proportional representation (System used in Scotland and Wales) Each constituency counts the number of votes. People vote for a party not the candidate. The party elected is more accurately more popular, with the majority of the people. Eg in Wales 75% of people vote Labour therefore 75% of Labour candidates will be represented in parliament. Sometimes it is difficult to get a majority vote with this system. A coalition is usually formed where parties work together by giving up some of their policies.
  6. 6. Proportional Representation & Constituencies Arguments for and against..
  7. 7. In favour of proportional representation <ul><li>It means the wishes of the voters are respected. </li></ul><ul><li>For example, 20% of the electorate vote liberal democrat, the Liberal democrats will get 20% of the seats. </li></ul><ul><li>It means that a party will have to win at least 50% of the vote to form the government. </li></ul><ul><li>It could lead to less extreme politics as parties will have to cooperate to form a government together. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Arguments against proportional representation. <ul><li>It means MP’s will not represent a particular group of people, they will just represent a party. </li></ul><ul><li>MP’s will not be independent, they will have to do as they are told by the party leader. </li></ul><ul><li>Coalition governments can be weak and change frequently. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Arguments in favour of constituencies… <ul><li>MP represents a particular local group of people and can be contacted directly to deal with issues such as roads / garbage disposal. </li></ul><ul><li>MP has been elected by a group of people rather than a party list. </li></ul><ul><li>So he / she may be independent and criticise the party they belong to. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Arguments against constituencies.. <ul><li>They allow people to be elected when most voters don’t want them. </li></ul><ul><li>They allow a party to form a government with a large majority in the House of commons, but with a minority of votes in the country. </li></ul><ul><li>A political party can gain millions of votes, but have no MP’s!! </li></ul>

×