Biographical•   Howard Phillips Lovecraft was born in 1890 in    Providence, Rhode Island•   Raised by his mother, two aun...
• He wrote 50+ stories Between  1905 and 1935, many  published in pulp magazines  such as Weird Tales• Influenced by the g...
• Lovecraft was certainly a horror writer, but  the term doesn’t really do him justice.• He developed his own “world”, the...
“Lovecraftian”•   Weird/bizarre•   Other/Otherworldly•   Mysterious/Hidden/Forbidden•   Ancient/Arcane•   Interdimensional...
So what’s different here?The “evil” in Lovecraft does not come from any traditional,   recognisable source, human or paran...
• “Like many of Lovecrafts stories this movie  has that feeling of going into the unknown,  of discovering an otherwordly ...
“Now all my tales are based on the fundamental premise that   common human laws and interests and emotions have no   valid...
H.P.LovecraftMadness and an Irrational Universe
“The most merciful thingin the world, I think, isthe    inability  of  thehuman mind to correlateall its contents. We live...
Encounters With The Old Ones            The Thing Cannot Be Described“Of the six men who never reached theship, he thinks ...
That Which Causes Madness Through Cosmic             Horror is Better Left Unseen“The present voodoo orgy was, indeed, on ...
The Geometry Was All Wrong         Azathoth – The Ultimate Irrationality[Wilcox] talked of his dreams in a   Outside the o...
The “Great Texts”• The Call of Cthulhu (1926) - the most famous, (but I actually  think one of the weakest) of the core st...
• The Colour from Outer Space (1927) -  *FAVOURITE* - The story that hooked me on  Lovecraft - fallen meteor/disease and  ...
• The Dunwich Horror (1928) - backwards  country folk, "strangely domed hills", hints of  demonic cults, un-nameable blasp...
• The Whisperer in the Darkness (1930) -  Strange, alien goings on, rasping inhuman  voices heard in the woods, weird form...
• At the Mountains of Madness (1931) -  *FAVOURITE* - A Novella. Ancient fossilised  things discovered in the Antarctic. A...
• The Dreams in the Witch House (1932) - Talk  of weird maths and geometry (angles again!),  inter-dimensional travel, dre...
• The Shadow Over Innsmouth (1932) -  *FAVOURITE* - Fishy decaying sea side town  where something is seriously not right w...
• The Shadow out of Time (1934) - Ancient lost  cities (again), dream/reality confusion, cosmic  scale, a lot of mythos hi...
Mythologising• Necromonicon, Pnakotic Manuscripts, Book of  Ebion etc.• Arkham and Miskatonic University
Languagehttp://cthulhuchick.com/wordcount-lovecraft-favorite-words/
Creatures•   “They seemed to be enormous, iridescent cones, about ten feet high and    ten feet wide at the base, and made...
Sea Creature      ~or~Lovecraft Fan-Art
~End~
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft
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Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft

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Self-confessed fan-boys Chris Hose and Thomas Morton delve into Lovecraft's gibbering, eldritch world to ask why a writer of pulp short stories is held in such reverence. The surprising philosophical depths of his world view and his wide-reaching influence on modern pop-culture.

Hmmm Squad regulars will have heard the name often whispered furtively by acolytes lurking on the threshold - here's your chance to find out why. Biscuits, beverages, mind-paralysing horror, etc.

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Weird Tales of Cosmic Horror: The World and Work of HP Lovecraft

  1. 1. Biographical• Howard Phillips Lovecraft was born in 1890 in Providence, Rhode Island• Raised by his mother, two aunts and grandfather. His father went psychotic and died when Lovecraft was very small.• From a well-to-do family that fell on (relatively) hard times.• Wanted to be an astronomer, but had a “nervous breakdown” before he graduated.• Plagued by “Night Guants”• Unsurprisingly was a strange, imaginative child and become a strange, reclusive young adult.• Was brought out of his shell by developing contacts and correspondence with other writers, that shaped and encouraged his own career as a writer.• Married in 1924 and moved to New York, but it wasn’t a happy time – financial troubles, lack of work, and prolonged separation led to divorce a few years later.• Returned to Providence to live with his aunts for their (and his) remaining years.• Lovecraft died early, of intestinal cancer, in 1937 aged 46.
  2. 2. • He wrote 50+ stories Between 1905 and 1935, many published in pulp magazines such as Weird Tales• Influenced by the gothic horror of Edgar Allan Poe, the fantasy stories of Lord Dunsany and ancient-arcane-evil stories of Arthur Machen• Stories divide roughly (but not neatly) into standard macabre horror (earlier stories) dream- world fantasy pieces (mid period) and proper Lovecraft (Cthulhu) mythos stories (later, longer stories).
  3. 3. • Lovecraft was certainly a horror writer, but the term doesn’t really do him justice.• He developed his own “world”, the details of which were revealed in small chunks and mysterious hints in his stand-alone stories.• He himself described his genre as “Weird Fiction” and his form of horror as “Cosmic Horror”.
  4. 4. “Lovecraftian”• Weird/bizarre• Other/Otherworldly• Mysterious/Hidden/Forbidden• Ancient/Arcane• Interdimensional/Cosmic• Dreams/Madness
  5. 5. So what’s different here?The “evil” in Lovecraft does not come from any traditional, recognisable source, human or paranormal – his horror is not fundamentally about murder, torture, gore, ghosts, ghouls, death, demons, hell, etc – at least not in a conventional sense – though many of these things do feature in his stories.In his best works the “evil” is something on the edge of our world, mysterious and unknown, alien and “other”, possibly incomprehensible - which is precisely why it’s so terrifying.The evil in Lovecraft isn’t even “evil” as such – it’s a-moral. It’s simply utterly indifferent to the wants and needs of human life - hostile, chaotic, “other” and “unnatural” to us.
  6. 6. • “Like many of Lovecrafts stories this movie has that feeling of going into the unknown, of discovering an otherwordly thing that has existed for eons yet we know nothing about. Of knowledge of the universe that could drive you MAD!”
  7. 7. “Now all my tales are based on the fundamental premise that common human laws and interests and emotions have no validity or significance in the vast cosmos-at-large. To me there is nothing but puerility in a tale in which the human form – and the local human passions and conditions and standards – are depicted as native to other worlds or other universes.To achieve the essence of real externality, whether of time or space or dimension, one must forget that such things as organic life, good and evil, love and hate, and all such local attributes of a negligible and temporary race called mankind, have any existence at all.Only the human scenes and characters must have human qualities.These must be handled with unsparing realism, (not catch- penny romanticism) but when we cross the line to the boundless and hideous unknown – the shadow- haunted Outside – we must remember to leave our humanity and terrestrialism at the threshold.”H.P. Lovecraft in note to the editor of Weird Tales on resubmission of "The Call of Cthulhu"
  8. 8. H.P.LovecraftMadness and an Irrational Universe
  9. 9. “The most merciful thingin the world, I think, isthe inability of thehuman mind to correlateall its contents. We liveon a placid island ofignorance in the midst ofblack seas of infinity,and it was not meant tovoyage far.” (The Call of Cthulhu –1926)
  10. 10. Encounters With The Old Ones The Thing Cannot Be Described“Of the six men who never reached theship, he thinks two perished of purefright in that accursed instant. TheThing cannot be described – there isno language for such abysms ofshrieking and immemorial lunacy, sucheldritch contradictions of all matter,force, and cosmic order. A mountainwalked or stumbled. God!...Then, “If I say that my somewhatbolder than the storied Cyclops, great extravagant imagination yieldedCthulhu slid greasily into the water and simultaneously pictures of anbegan to pursue with vast wave- octopus, a dragon, and a humanraising strokes of cosmic potency. caricature, I shall not beBriden looked back and went mad, unfaithful to the spirit of thelaughing shrilly as he kept on laughing thing…but it was the generalat intervals till death found him one outline of the whole which madenight in the cabin whilst Johanson was it most shockingly frightful.” (Callwandering deliriously.” (Call of Cthulhu of Cthulhu – 1926)-1926)
  11. 11. That Which Causes Madness Through Cosmic Horror is Better Left Unseen“The present voodoo orgy was, indeed, on the merest What Unimaginablefringe of this abhorred area, but the location was bad Connections?enough…Only poetry or madness could do justice to -A Deranged Artistthe noises heard by Legrasse’s men as they ploughed -A Voodoo Culton through the black morass toward the red glare and -A new Islandmuffled tom-toms…In a natural glade of the swamp.On this now leaped and twisted [an] indescribable The strange linkshorde of human abnormality…void of clothing, this between the threehybrid spawn were braying bellowing and writhing…It stories of ‘The Callmay have been only imagination and it may have only of Cthulhu’ serve asbeen echoes which induced one of the men, an a model for theexcitable Spaniard, to fancy he had heard antiphonal strange connections of the entire mythosresponses to the ritual from some far and and the realityunilluminated spot…to hint of the faint beating of behind it.wings, and of a glimpse of shining eyes and amountainous white bulk beyond the remotesttrees. (Call of Cthulhu – 1926)
  12. 12. The Geometry Was All Wrong Azathoth – The Ultimate Irrationality[Wilcox] talked of his dreams in a Outside the ordered universe [is]strangely poetic fashion; making that amorphous blight ofme see with terrible vividness the nethermost confusion whichdamp Cyclopean city of green blasphemes and bubbles at thestone – whose geometry, he oddly centre of all infinity—thesaid, was all wrong… (Call of boundless daemon sultanCtthulhu -1926) Azathoth, whose name no lips dare speak aloud, and whoParker slipped as the other three gnaws hungrily in inconceivable,were plunging frenziedly over unlighted chambers beyond timeendless vistas of green-crusted and space amidst the muffled,rock to the boat, and Johansen maddening beating of vile drumsswears he was swallowed up by an and the thin monotonous whineangle of masonry which shouldn’t of accursed flutes. (The Dreamhave been there; an angle which Quest of Unkown Kadath – 1933)was acute, but behaved as if itwas obtuse. (Call of Cthulhu –1926) http://vimeo.com/9405378
  13. 13. The “Great Texts”• The Call of Cthulhu (1926) - the most famous, (but I actually think one of the weakest) of the core stories... mainly famous for Cthulhu himself and his "wrong angled" city (R’lyeh) under the sea.
  14. 14. • The Colour from Outer Space (1927) - *FAVOURITE* - The story that hooked me on Lovecraft - fallen meteor/disease and mutation analogy, and yes, it is about an alien "colour".
  15. 15. • The Dunwich Horror (1928) - backwards country folk, "strangely domed hills", hints of demonic cults, un-nameable blasphemous spawn ect. ect.
  16. 16. • The Whisperer in the Darkness (1930) - Strange, alien goings on, rasping inhuman voices heard in the woods, weird forms seen in the river - revealed to be bizarrer than you might imagine.
  17. 17. • At the Mountains of Madness (1931) - *FAVOURITE* - A Novella. Ancient fossilised things discovered in the Antarctic. Ancient ruins, frozen and buried. Extremely influential.
  18. 18. • The Dreams in the Witch House (1932) - Talk of weird maths and geometry (angles again!), inter-dimensional travel, dream/reality confusion, the perils of student digs. And a rat with a human face. Excellent.
  19. 19. • The Shadow Over Innsmouth (1932) - *FAVOURITE* - Fishy decaying sea side town where something is seriously not right with the locals. You will never look at sea side towns – or fish – quite the same again.
  20. 20. • The Shadow out of Time (1934) - Ancient lost cities (again), dream/reality confusion, cosmic scale, a lot of mythos hinted at and tied together, remarkably sci fi.
  21. 21. Mythologising• Necromonicon, Pnakotic Manuscripts, Book of Ebion etc.• Arkham and Miskatonic University
  22. 22. Languagehttp://cthulhuchick.com/wordcount-lovecraft-favorite-words/
  23. 23. Creatures• “They seemed to be enormous, iridescent cones, about ten feet high and ten feet wide at the base, and made up of some ridgy, scaly, semi-elastic matter. From their apexes projected four flexible, cylindrical members, each a foot thick, and of a ridgy substance like that of the cones themselves. These members were sometimes contracted almost to nothing, and sometimes extended to any distance up to about ten feet. Terminating two of them were enormous claws or nippers. At the end of a third were four red, trumpet-like appendages. The fourth terminated in an irregular yellowish globe some two feet in diameter and having three great dark eyes ranged along its central circumference. Surmounting this head were four slender grey stalks bearing flower-like appendages, whilst from its nether side dangled eight greenish antennae or tentacles. The great base of the central cone was fringed with a rubbery, grey substance which moved the whole entity through expansion and contraction.”
  24. 24. Sea Creature ~or~Lovecraft Fan-Art
  25. 25. ~End~

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