Effective marketing for small organisations

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  • Today, build an effective marketing campaign\n
  • It doesn’t matter how much you know, what matters is 1) how you use what you know and 2) your ability to find out what you need to know\n
  • It doesn’t matter how much you know, what matters is 1) how you use what you know and 2) your ability to find out what you need to know\n
  • It doesn’t matter how much you know, what matters is 1) how you use what you know and 2) your ability to find out what you need to know\n
  • Shopping list - money value + actions for people to take\n
  • Who? > 3 -5 categories, then what do they do, like, etc... \n
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  • How\n
  • Keep your eyes on the prize\n
  • These are just a few social media websites... what are all the communication channels you know, grouped in types?\n
  • Now start matching process > marketing is very much like getting married: don’t go in pub and propose... first get to know and aim for kiss, then spend time together and eventually, get married. So what does the model look like for marketing? > Engagement spiral\n
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  • create interest = 3 types > 1. makes you think 2. creates conversation 3. creates an emotional reaction\n
  • create interest = 3 types > 1. makes you think 2. creates conversation 3. creates an emotional reaction\n
  • create interest = 3 types > 1. makes you think 2. creates conversation 3. creates an emotional reaction\n
  • Build relations > what is their motivation? > what’s in it for them?\n
  • engage > how do you get people to do these kind of things? journey > step by step, low commitment... why come back?\n
  • Reward\n
  • Reward\n
  • Reward\n
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  • Effective marketing for small organisations

    1. 1. Effective Marketing forSmall Organisations Noam Kostucki
    2. 2. Who is the blue man?
    3. 3. Effective Marketing
    4. 4. Your marketing knowledge
    5. 5. Your marketing knowledge Genius or Genius
    6. 6. Market Research for Museums !
    7. 7. Compared to last year investment Trusts & Foundations (£/millions) Individuals (£/millions) this year will: Business (£/millions) 2008 total PI (£/millions) Increase & Same (%) Increase (%) Same (%) 700 Marketing 81.4 20.3 61.0 600 CSR 83.3 16.7 66.7 500 Staff engagement 78.1 15.6 62.5 400 Charitable giving 88.9 33.3 55.6 300 Investment 100.0 0.0 100.0Results 200 100 Though fewer respondents considered investment such as corporate art a 0 investing in the arts, they were less likely to decrease their investment thisDefining business support/sponsorship/investment for the arts by ranking according to last year.priorities, with 1 being the highest and 5 being the lowest. Staff engagement, seems to be in the short term, the activity most likely cuts this year compared to last.Rank Item Rank Overall % Highest priority only % According to Arts & Business, the total amount of Private Investment (PI) in culture has beenCSR 1 24.1 23.5 experiencing healthy growth since 1996. Business investment has undergone various fluctuations throughout the years, which are 120 many cases attributed to the unpredictable38.6Marketing in 2 24.0 nature of Capital Projects. 100Staff engagement 3 22.7 20.9(including onwardsand development) In 2001 training A&B included individuals and trusts and foundations as key sources of 80 private investment to be traced for the cultural sector. These three categories are therefore 60Charitable Giving calculation of total PI in the sector. 4 now used for the This shows18.8 increasing importance of the 11.8 40 Incr individual giving as the primary source of investment for arts organisations, which is itselfInvestment e.g. corporate art 5 10.3 3.9 Sam rising substantially. 20 Dec 0These figures identify Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Marketing as the keymotivations for business investment in the arts.
    8. 8. Individual Giving (Arts & Culture)In 2007/08 individual giving reached a record total of £382 million in the UK. This is a staggering £236 millionincrease over just eight years.Low-level giving is up to £100 but normally between £5-£10;Mid-level giving is up to £1,000, but normally it is below £500;Around 90% of donations received by cultural organisations are low- and mid-level donations (most frequently low-level);These donations tend to happen at the point of sale when attendees decide to round up a ticket price;Donors who give several times throughout a year tend to give a larger overall financial donation than those whogive once – the message is to get people to keep giving small amounts regularly.Reasons around local pride and a personal connection were the most commonly cited reasons for giving to aparticular organisation;90% of donors come from the most committed art attendees – having attended the venue/organisation three ormore times in the past two years;75% of donors were engaged with the organisation in some manner from members/visitors, a friend, patron, on amailing list, volunteers through to trustees. Low-level givers tended to be involved through things like volunteering,while mid-level donors tended to be trustees and ambassadors;So what motivated their first ever donation? The answer is simple – being asked! Direct approaches activated 40%of first-ever donationsMany of the donors interviewed were part of the organisation’s Friends scheme, of them 47% said being Friendencouraged them to give and 43% said it made no difference;
    9. 9. “To avoid the hassle of paperwork”£50K+, 60-64,“Just for cash flow reasons” £50K+, 75-79,“Can make it an equivalent to a larger donation”£15K-£20K, 35-39, The majority of donors (nearly 70%) were low-level donors whilst another fifth (ca. mid-level range. This means that the vast majority of donors (nearly 90%) are in th“At that level once a year is easier, just one lump sum” level giving ranges. Only a small percentage (10%) of respondents in the sample w£10K-£15K, 65-69, donors, which concurs with the findings of other charitable giving literature that a s large donations accounts for a large proportion of the total given.8“I think it seemed more practical and we thought that from the organisation’s point of view it was better to havethat lump sum and to get all the interest from it over the years” Large donations are, of course,Undisclosed, 75-79, administration; but the notion of small organisations successfully accessing what is highly sought after, pool of wealthy donors is perhaps unrealistic. In the arts econo“I would forget if it was spread out; I’d rather just pay it. It gives you a chance to reconsider at the end of the year” majority of organisations are micro and small-sized, operating at a local level to ser£10-£15K, 55-59, regional audiences and it could be argued that revenue from a well run small donat could meet financial needs in a proportionate yet effective way.For those who preferred to contribute more often, convenience was also a theme, but also allowing for unplannedgiving/requests and perhaps as a (conscious) tactic to inflate the total amount contributed.“Money raised from the trips goes to the gallery” £25K-£30K, 30-34, Low/mid-level donations, giving frequency and method“Mainly because I was asked by [fundraiser] – [...] depending on what it is for I sometimes say yes [...] I am very The survey of donors allowed for a more detailed look at donation values and how tencouraged by what I see [at the theatre] so I am very happy to give” giving methods and frequency. One issue in identifying individual giving patternsUndisclosed, 75-79, is that many arts organisations have a portfolio of fundraising products. Art donors through diverse products and while these are often structured (for example, a mont they can also be spontaneous or responsive, the result of a prompt or an ad hoc req
    10. 10. Engagement Spiral 1. Create interest4. Reward 2. Build relations 3. Engage
    11. 11. Do
    12. 12. How do they feel?
    13. 13. How do they feel?
    14. 14. How do they feel?
    15. 15. 1. Do your research 2. Answer questions3. Divide actions & set deadlines 4. Monitor results 5. Prepare a new plan
    16. 16. Noam KostuckiProfile & Direct Email - www.about.me/noamkos LinkedIn - www.bit.ly/noamkos Twitter - @noamkos

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