Save Palawan Movement Regina Paz Lopez

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Save Palawan Movement



Regina Paz Lopez



Doc Gerry's Dream



No To Mining In Palawan

Mining Impacts on Palawan as an Island Ecosystem – an NGO Perspective

April 2011

Published in: Education, Technology, Travel
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  • Very informative slide share. We need to be aware also of what's going on in Homonhon Island.
    There's widespread ecological destruction due to mining too!
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  • ‎'NO TO MINING IN PALAWAN, and other Key Biodiversity Areas (KBAs), Island Ecosystems, Natural Forests and Agricultural Lands.'
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
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  • Write a comment...www.no2mininginpalawan.com
    and VOTE to stop large-scale
    open-pit mining in PALAWAN
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
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Save Palawan Movement Regina Paz Lopez

  1. 1. BioDiversity
  2. 2. Philippine Land Vertebrates: 2011 Estimates Total species Endemic Species % EndemicLand Mammals 237 181 76%Breeding Land 395 172 44& Birds Reptiles 259 168 65% Amphibians 102 78 77% TOTAL 993 601 61% Spain 435 25 6% Brazil 3131 788 25%
  3. 3. Source: Haribon Foundation 2003 based on ESSC 1999
  4. 4. Source: Haribon Foundation 2003 based on ESSC 1999
  5. 5. Source: Haribon Foundation 2003 based on ESSC 1999
  6. 6. Source: Haribon Foundation 2003 based on ESSC 1999
  7. 7. Source: Haribon Foundation 2003 based on ESSC 1999
  8. 8. The Island Ecosystem A. Mangrove D. Cropland G. Seagrass beds B. Forest E. Human Settlement C. Coral F. River/CreekThe mining area with open pit is letter H. B2 represents denuded forest.The darker tint of the coral reef at the left side represents dead corals.
  9. 9. Acidic Pagcolbonriver inRapu-Rapu.
  10. 10. The shore at the outfall of Pagcolbon River. Water from the outletis also acidic.
  11. 11. Pagcolbon upstream Pagcolbon outletContaminated Tailings, mud, silt carried by rainwater by run-offand river/creeks downslope towards the sea.
  12. 12. Contaminated Tailings, mud andsilt that flowed downslope towardsthe sea.(Ungay and Hollowstone)
  13. 13. Fish Killing in Rapu-Rapu (2007)
  14. 14. - 13 species of seagrass recorded in Palawan (81% of the known seagrass species in the country)- 31 species of mangroves in Palawan (90% of the known mangrove species in the country)- 44,500 hectares of mangrove forests in Palawan (40% of the remaining mangroves in the country)- 379 species of corals (82% of the total coral species recorded in the entire country) (Credit: Conservation International)
  15. 15. - 89% of total reef fish recorded in the country is found in the corridor- 4 of the 5 marine turtles are found in Palawan- 15 of the 25 recorded marine mammals are reported from Palawan- 18 species of freshwater fish is found in Palawan (50% endemic to the province) (Credit: Conservation Internationa
  16. 16. - 26 species of amphibians (25% endemic to the country, majority are confined to the corridor- 69 species of reptiles found in the corridor (29% are endemic to the country)- 279 species of birds (10% are endemic to the country)- 34% of bird species are migratory, making the region a vital flyway for migratory birds (Credit: Conservation International)
  17. 17. - 58 species of terrestrial mammals are recorded, 19 or 33% are endemic to the country, 16 are restricted to the corridor (Credit: Conservation International)
  18. 18. Palawan as an Island Ecosystem• “Palawan is composed of a long main island lying in a northeast to southwest axis and surrounding it are clusters of lesser islands…..The main island has a tall steep mountain spine running down its length fringed by narrow coastal plans protected from storm waves by fringing coral reefs and mangrove swamps. Although seemingly lush and bountiful, the environment of Palawan is fragile and its topsoils are relatively thin, poor and prone to erosion.” (Source: Strategic Environmental Plan for Palawan, Towards Sustainable Development, Prepared by the Palawan Integrated Area Development Project Office with the assistance of Hunting Technical Services Limited England in association with the Orient Integrated Development Consultants, Inc., Philippines and Sir Mac Donald and Partners, England)
  19. 19. Effect of mining,topsoil is removed
  20. 20. In Palawan, rain induced landslides can affect43.7% of the island.Palawan is No. 27 of 32 provinces with povertyincidence of 40% which is susceptible to hazards.Its not worth the risk! (MTPDP – Chapter. Ten.)
  21. 21. Platinum Group Metals, Inc.(PGMC); photo by Lorenzo Tan
  22. 22. With Mining Application!!! Effect of mining, topsoil is removedCloser view of PGMC mine site; Photo by Bandillo ng Palawan (August 2007)
  23. 23. Mining area of Berong Nickel Corporation which plans to expand large-scalemining operations into natural forests. The mined area forms part of theVictoria-Anepahan Range, a key biodiversity area.
  24. 24. Natural Forest withMining Application Conservation International-Phils Damage of mining Landsat Image Prepared by: Year 1987
  25. 25. Natural Forest withMining Application Conservation International-Phils Damage of mining Landsat Image Prepared by: Year 2001
  26. 26. With mining application!!!Expansion of mining activities are being pursued in the Bulanjao rangewhich is still covered with natural forests which serve as watershed to lowland communities. (Photo by CI)
  27. 27. Mined area of Rio Tuba Nickel Mining Corporation
  28. 28. Limestone quarry in Gotok, Sandoval, Bataraza
  29. 29. Dumpsite within the mining site of RTN
  30. 30. Governing Laws and Policies• Proclamation No. 219 (1967) establishing Palawan as a Game Refuge and Wildlife Sanctuary• Proclamation No. 2152 (1981) establishing Palawan as a Mangrove Reserve• UNESCO Man and Biosphere Reserve• National Integrated Protected Areas System (NIPAS, January 1992)• Republic Act No. 7611 (or the Strategic Environmental Plan for Palawan, or SEP law, June 1992)
  31. 31. Issues of Governance
  32. 32. MTPDP 2011 – 2016, Chapter 10 (Final Draft)• Challenges and opportunities to ensure ecological integrity: 1. Transparency on public disclosure. 2. Equitable distribution on mining benefits. 3. No standard resource and environment valuation (full costbenefit analysis).
  33. 33. Continued.. 4. Conflicting and overlapping policies. 5. Insufficient capacity of government for environment and natural resources mgt. 6. Inadequate implementation of laws. 7. Insufficient program to increase value added natural resources.
  34. 34. Applications for Mineral MINING APPLICATIONSExploration, Mineral Production El Nido -4 on the “Last Frontier” 150 has.Sharing Agreement (MPSA) and Silica/Nat GasSmall Scale MiningPermit (SSMP) in Palawan Taytay-12 30,820.50 has. Coron- 6 San Vicente- 5 573 has. 4,993.13 has. Silica Puerto Princesa City-42 112,154.67 has Dumaran -5 Aborlan – 79 812.67 has. 69,502.92 has. Silica Quezon-41 Roxas- 31 93,181.83 has 7,473.50 has Nickel and limestone Silica Narra- 44 Rizal- 11 61,443.31 has 24,833.45 has Nickel Espanola -12 45,824.51 has Balabac - 5 Nickel and limestone 17,093.63 has Brooke’s Pt. 37Nickel, Gold, Copper, 121,969.35 has Prepared by the Chromite Nickel Bataraza- 22 Palawan NGO 60,642.30 has. Network, Inc. Limestone, Nickel,HPP (PNNI)
  35. 35. Palawan’s Key Biodiversity Areas Mining Applications
  36. 36. Health Hazards
  37. 37. Water Pollution Affected coastal area of Colandorang Bay, Balabac due to abandoned and unrehabilitated copper mine(Photo by Professor Patrick Regoniel)
  38. 38. Metal Poison Health Risks (Marinduque)
  39. 39. Old Man with Blisters and Boils (Marinduque)
  40. 40. Boils and scars due to acidmine drainage and heavymetal poisoning(which flowed throughthe rivers)- Siocon, Zamboangadel Norte
  41. 41. Wilson Manuba and his father Pedro – both Calancan Bay fishermen are suffering from severe Arsenic Poisoning, they can no longer work.
  42. 42. Agriculture and Food Security Issues
  43. 43. Unhealthy soil caused by mining Healthy soil
  44. 44. Healthy Rice Field which is in danger Barren Rice Field which is biologicallydue to the acid mine drainage to be dead for 16 years due to mine tailings ofbrought by Intex Resources Marcopper(Oriental Mindoro) (Marinduque)
  45. 45. Rice Field Barrier Toxicated Rice FieldOther side of the river used to be a rice field, but is now dead due to the toxicchemicals from operations of Victoria Gold Mines in Benguet. Farmers built a smallbarrier to prevent contamination on the other side.
  46. 46. Used to be a healthy rice field with 7.33 M kg of rice worth US$ 2.27M per annum,but is now dead due to the toxic pollution of the rivers caused by mining.(Cervantes, Abra)
  47. 47. As of 2008, NGOs placed the count at 800abandoned mine sites have not been cleaned upwhile the MGB insists that there are only sevenmajor abandoned mines collectively known as“The Dirty Seven” for their levels of pollution.Clean-up costs are estimated in billions of dollarsand the damage caused will be never be fullyreversed. - Legacy of Disasters 2011, published by Alyansa Tigil Mina
  48. 48. “The Dirty Seven”1. Bagacay Mines – Philippine Pyrite Corporation Bagacay, Hinabangan, Western Samar (1956 – 1992)
  49. 49. “The Dirty Seven”2. Tagburos Mines – Palawan Quick Silver Mines Tagburos, Puerto Princesa City, Palawan (1953 – 1976)
  50. 50. “The Dirty Seven”3. Basay Mines – Basay Mining Corp.Brgy. Malinao, Basay, Negros Oriental (1978 – 1994)
  51. 51. “The Dirty Seven”4. Mogpog Mines – Consolidated Mines Inc. Mogpog, Marinduque (1977 – 1979)
  52. 52. Heavy Metal Poisoning (Marinduque)Dead Mogpog River – Acid Mine Drainage
  53. 53. “The Dirty Seven”5. Benguet Mines – Black Mountain Mines Tuba, Benguet (years of operation not determined)
  54. 54. “The Dirty Seven”6. Benguet Exploration - Thanksgiving Mine Inc. Tuba, Benguet (years of operation not determined)
  55. 55. “The Dirty Seven”7. Atok Mines – Western Minolco Atok, Benguet (1974 - 1982)
  56. 56. Insufficient SOCIO-ECONOMIC BENEFITS to the Local Community• Bataraza, Palawan: After almost 30 years of mining operations of Rio Tuba Nickel Mining Corporation (RTNMC), the municipality of Bataraza lags behind other municipalities in the delivery of basic services, such as electricity, water, transportation and education and remains to be among the poorest municipalities of the province. Data from the mining company contained in their 2001 Environmental Impact Statement for their Hydrometallurgical Processing Plant (HPP) Project indicate such poverty incidence. Mined waste dump site which might flow towards the forest
  57. 57. Which has more weight?Jobs, scholarships, day care centers, infrastructure, revenues/taxes ORClean air, clean and adequate water supply, productivefarmlands, healthy coral reefs and fishery resources, watersheds, biodiversity
  58. 58. “A 50-year old tree has a value of $193,250” (approximately Php9M) $62,000 - oxygen, air pollution(Prof TM Das of Univ. of Calcutta) control and soil pollution control (Php 3M) $37,500 - water (P1.8M) $31,250 - organic fertilizer (P1.5M) $31,200 – recycles (P1.5M) $31,250 - habitat (P1.5M) (source: Conservation International)
  59. 59. Mount Mantalingahan
  60. 60. Mount Mantalingahan
  61. 61. Mount Mantalingahan
  62. 62. Mount Mantalingahan
  63. 63. Mount Matalingahan
  64. 64. Mount Mantalingahan
  65. 65. Mount Mantalingahan Rich Biodiversity
  66. 66. Mount Mantalingahan The “Katutubo”
  67. 67. Mount Mantalingahan The “Katutubo kids”
  68. 68. Mount Bulanjao
  69. 69. Mount Bulanjao
  70. 70. Bulanjao Rice Field
  71. 71. Sibuyan Island• GALAPAGOS OF ASIA - because of the magnificence of its flora and fauna• WORLD’S DENSEST FOREST (Identified by National Museum) • In a single hectare, 1,551 trees comprising 123 species, which 54 were endemic • With 131 Species of Birds• CENTER OF ENDEMISM (Field Museum in Chicago Illinois) • 35 endangered and endemic species in almost all barangays outside the protected areas.
  72. 72. Sibuyan Island
  73. 73. Sibuyan Island
  74. 74. Sibuyan IslandEnchanted Sibuyan Stream
  75. 75. Sibuyan IslandSibuyan clear water
  76. 76. Sibuyan IslandSome Endemic Species of Sibuyan
  77. 77. Sibuyan Island• MPSA (Mineral Production Sharing Agreement) • 1,580.8010 hectares approved • 3,578.4102 hectares for application• EP (Exploration Applications) • 15,046.3687 hectares for application
  78. 78. Sibuyan IslandMINING APPLICATIONS!!!
  79. 79. Economic
  80. 80. PROMOTING CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATIONIN CITY TOURISM PROGRAMS FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT The Puerto Princesa Experience
  81. 81. In line with the City’s sustainable developmentprogram there are only two major projects that arebeing promoted heavily : TOURISM……  Tourist Income: 2.4B  Tourist Arrivals: 268,942 (2009)  Most number foreign visitors: American, Korean, German, Japanese, Chinese, Canadian, Australian French and Swiss
  82. 82. ….Agriculture FISHING  10,600 MT fish exports  1.8 MT sold at local market  Shoreline stretches over 416 kms.  Coastal waters covers 327,583 has.  Supplies 50% of fish requirements in Metro Manila
  83. 83. Governance  Efficiency of Service Delivery  Initiatives to Promote Transparency
  84. 84. • Muro – Ami• Cyanide Fishing• Trawl Fishing• Dead Corals due todynamite fishing
  85. 85. With the comprehensive environmental program dubbed as “Bantay Puerto” (Puerto Princesa Watch) Forest cover increased from 52% in 1992 to 63% at presentSource: Environmentally Critical Areas Network Zoning Project /PCSDS
  86. 86. HYBRID SOLAR AND WIND TURBINE LAMP POST
  87. 87. HYBRID SOLAR AND WINDTURBINE LAMP POST
  88. 88. …TODAY...Because of new policies and legislations, PuertoPrincesa is now …... A booming tourist destination
  89. 89. BEFORE PRESENT50 Million Investments 10 Billion7 Banks 32 Banks3 Hotels 110 HotelsInfrastructure Concrete Roads12,000 Tourists 425,000 Tourists1 Flight a week 11 flights maximum0 Monuments World Heritage Site Geological
  90. 90. Magandang Pilipinas Ecotourism ProjectPUERTO PRINCESA, PALAWAN: DOLPHIN WATCHING
  91. 91. Magandang Pilipinas Ecotourism Project PUERTO PRINCESA, PALAWAN: Brgy. Tulingan Fishermen’s Association• Organized and trained the Brgy Tulingan Fisherman’s Association with 38 members• 50% of collection is retained by the association for operations and maintenance.• Reporting of illegal fishing in Puerto Bay
  92. 92. Magandang Pilipinas Ecotourism ProjectPUERTO PRINCESA, PALAWAN: Mangrove River Cruise Sitio San Carlos, Brgy. Bacungan
  93. 93. Magandang Pilipinas Ecotourism ProjectPUERTO PRINCESA, PALAWAN
  94. 94. Magandang Pilipinas Ecotourism ProjectPUERTO PRINCESA, PALAWAN: Brgy. Iwahig, Iwahig River
  95. 95. Magandang Pilipinas Ecotourism ProjectPUERTO PRINCESA, PALAWAN: Iwahig Firefly Watching & Mangrove RiverCruise GOLD AWARD WINNER 2010 Pacific-Asia Tourism Association
  96. 96. Magandang Pilipinas Ecotourism Project PUERTO PRINCESA, PALAWANDalubKaragatan Floating School and Pambato Reef Snorkeling Honda Bay, Brgy. Sta. Lourdes
  97. 97. Magandang Pilipinas Ecotourism ProjectPUERTO PRINCESA, PALAWAN: Spelunking at Ugong Rock
  98. 98. Magandang Pilipinas Ecotourism Project PUERTO PRINCESA, PALAWAN: Spelunking at Ugong Rock•Organized the Tagabinet Community Tourism Association, Inc. with 24 members (96% female and 4% male)
  99. 99. Magandang Pilipinas Ecotourism Project PUERTO PRINCESA, PALAWANCOMPARATIVE VISITORS TRAFFIC & REVENUE GENERATED YEAR 2008 YEAR 2009 YEAR 2010 Visitors Income Visitors Income Visitors Income (in Million (in Million (in Million PHP) PHP) PHP)Brgy. Tulingan 43 0.02 633 0.28 724 0.31Fishermen’s Association,Inc.Mangrove River Cruise 254 0.04 928 0.37 474 0.21(Sitio San Carlos, Brgy.Bacungan)Iwahig Firefly Watching 283 0.06 2,844 0.53 5,113 1.04Honda Bay, Brgy. Sta. 597 0.06 14,645 0.68 18,728 0.94LourdesSpelunking & Summit 109 0.01 1,333 0.13 4,064 0.35View (Ugong Rock, Brgy.Tagabinet) TOTAL: 1,286 0.19 20,383 1.99 29,103 2.85
  100. 100. The LOHA’s Market www.inessence- organics.com/images/site/market...
  101. 101. NAURUhttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/83/Karst_following_phosphate_mining_on_Naur
  102. 102. NAURU www.jandvwilliams.com/Nauru_photos.html
  103. 103. NAURU http://www.albionmonitor.com/0304a/nauru.html
  104. 104. Nauru Sibuyan Island
  105. 105. Threatened BirdMining Applications Protected Areas Vegetation Map Localities
  106. 106. DO YOU REALLY WANT TO GO THIS ROUTE???!!!
  107. 107. PASIG RIVER The Lifeline of our Nation
  108. 108. Paco Headwater BEFORE
  109. 109. Paco Headwater as of April 6, 2011
  110. 110. Paco Headwater BEFORE
  111. 111. Paco Headwater as of February 14, 2011
  112. 112. OSMEÑA as of April 6, 2011
  113. 113. OSMEÑA as of April 27, 2011
  114. 114. Paco Tenement as of April 6, 2011
  115. 115. Paco Tenement as of April 27, 2011
  116. 116. Paco Tenement as of April 27, 2011
  117. 117. Paco Tenement as of March 30, 2011
  118. 118. Paco Tenement as of March 30, 2011
  119. 119. Behind Malacañang: Estero De San Miguel
  120. 120. Near Malacañang Estero De San MiguelPictures taken last January 18, 2011
  121. 121. SAN MIGUEL SECTION 1 WATER SYSTEM SECTION MAP SECTION 32 SECTIONSECTION 5 SECTION 4

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