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The Information cycle

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The Information cycle

  1. 1. The Information Cycle What is the Information Cycle? The Information Cycle: • Is the progression of media coverage for an event over time. • Shows the depth of coverage for each stage of the cycle. • Can help you understand the quantity and quality of information available at a particular point in the cycle. Social Media News Outlets Magazines Journals Books Reference Sources
  2. 2. The Information Cycle Minutes After the Event: Social Media Information: • Tends to be fragmented and very basic. • Is furnished by a mix of citizen-journalists, "regular folk”, professional journalists etc. • May lack details, substantiation, and objectivity. Examples: Facebook, Twitter, YouTube
  3. 3. The Information Cycle Day/Days After the Event: News Reports Information: • Tends to be more detailed than earlier reports : more details about event, people involved, outcome etc. • May include quotes from relevant parties and officials. • Is written by journalists. Examples: New York Times, CBS
  4. 4. The Information Cycle Week/Weeks of the Event: Magazines Information: • Is much more in-depth, and includes analysis, context and related topics. • May include quotes from relevant parties and officials. Examples: Time, Newsweek
  5. 5. The Information Cycle Months after the Event: Scholarly and Academic Journals Information: • Is written by people considered to be experts in the field. • Tends to focus on a discipline-specific aspect of the event, includes detailed analysis, and list of sources (bibliography). Examples: Journal of Islamic Studies, J.A.M.A.
  6. 6. The Information Cycle Year/Years after the Event: Books Information: • Provides in-depth coverage of an event – sometimes focusing on an specific aspect of the event, or, in contrast, providing a broad contextual overview. • Tends to be written by specialists, researchers and other professionals. (But not always.) Example: The Struggle for Egypt: From Nasser to Tahrir Square by Steven A. Cook
  7. 7. The Information Cycle Year/Years after the Event: Reference Material Information: • Provides an overview or summary of the event. • Tends to be written by specialists, researchers and other professionals. • Is considered established knowledge. • Is published in encyclopedias, dictionaries and textbooks. Example: Gale Virtual Reference Library entry for “Arab Spring”

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