Intergenerational Networking

1,292 views

Published on

For the first time ever, there are four generations (Traditionals, Baby Boomers, Generation X and Millenials) in the workplace. This can be the root of many communication issues, ranging from employee interaction to job seekers interfacing with younger hiring managers and recruiters. In this presentation, I attempt to shed some light on generational characteristics as well as share relevant communication tips. Thanks to all who attended the event and requested the content. Any questions, let me know in the comments below or by contacting me (info on the last slide). I am also considering creation of a companion video for this presentation; LMK what you think.

0 Comments
5 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,292
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
23
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
22
Comments
0
Likes
5
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Discuss & agree uponFrequency of communicationType (weekly or biweekly meeting in person, telecon, written reports) – adjust to fit the various generationsEveryone has a voicePractice, practice, practice getting input from everyoneYou may have to invite newer or quieter folks to speak (speak to by name, or ask anyone if they have questions)Communication adjusted by generation improves resultsGen Y Just a few years out of school—explicit instructions, locations of data, suggested procedure to be followed, required date “You may already know this, but here’s what has worked in the past…”Gen X responds better to : “Here’s the desired outcome. Please send me a project plan and schedule based on the procedure you plan to follow.”Baby Boomers/Matures: Just do it may be enough “This needs to be done.”Conflict EngagementConflict can ignite new ideas and lead to collaboration and creative problem solvingDevelop and exercise a process for raising issues and voicing different perspectivesAdjust Rewards based on generationInstant recognition vs. 6 months laterTime off vs. promotionMoney vs. more responsibilityTitle vs. window officeNew technological gadgetsAvoid assuming that because people are a certain age they will act a certain wayThere are generational trends and norms but there are a lot of people in each generation that don’t fit, likeThe 70-yr-old computer whiz who designs websites and blogsThe 25-yr-old who is not computer literateThe 55-yr-old who runs marathonsThe 45-r-old who volunteers 20 hours a week at the women and children’s shelterInstead of treating other as you like to be treated, find out how they like to be treated and respect them by honoring thatI.e. When working with someone older than you, this means not automatically addressing them by their first name, as you may prefer to be called. Instead, ask such individuals whether they want to be called by their first name or their lastAcknowledge age differenceTalk about how you can learn from each other and help each other be more successfulYou may be surprised by some of the things you have in common as well as each other’s different experiencesCross Generation MentoringTwice a month communication and idea exchangeGreat way to learn/teach and encourage future leadersFuture aspirations and opportunities for your global workforceOffer insight into organization’s or company’s strategic directions“I’m interested in what and how you are doing”While learning about differences among groups helps us work together better..get to know people as individuals if you want to work most effectively with them.
  • “I like the idea of explaining the obstacles as long as you can remain objective about it. In other words, don't drift toward the negative. Pull the emotion out of it and talk about the obstacles from a business standpoint and what you did to resolve or overcome the obstacles.” Justin Jones LinkedIn 4/16/13Discuss & agree uponFrequency of communicationType (weekly or biweekly meeting in person, telecon, written reports) – adjust to fit the various generationsEveryone has a voicePractice, practice, practice getting input from everyoneYou may have to invite newer or quieter folks to speak (speak to by name, or ask anyone if they have questions)Communication adjusted by generation improves resultsGen Y Just a few years out of school—explicit instructions, locations of data, suggested procedure to be followed, required date “You may already know this, but here’s what has worked in the past…”Gen X responds better to : “Here’s the desired outcome. Please send me a project plan and schedule based on the procedure you plan to follow.”Baby Boomers/Matures: Just do it may be enough “This needs to be done.”Conflict EngagementConflict can ignite new ideas and lead to collaboration and creative problem solvingDevelop and exercise a process for raising issues and voicing different perspectivesAdjust Rewards based on generationInstant recognition vs. 6 months laterTime off vs. promotionMoney vs. more responsibilityTitle vs. window officeNew technological gadgetsAvoid assuming that because people are a certain age they will act a certain wayThere are generational trends and norms but there are a lot of people in each generation that don’t fit, likeThe 70-yr-old computer whiz who designs websites and blogsThe 25-yr-old who is not computer literateThe 55-yr-old who runs marathonsThe 45-r-old who volunteers 20 hours a week at the women and children’s shelterInstead of treating other as you like to be treated, find out how they like to be treated and respect them by honoring thatI.e. When working with someone older than you, this means not automatically addressing them by their first name, as you may prefer to be called. Instead, ask such individuals whether they want to be called by their first name or their lastAcknowledge age differenceTalk about how you can learn from each other and help each other be more successfulYou may be surprised by some of the things you have in common as well as each other’s different experiencesCross Generation MentoringTwice a month communication and idea exchangeGreat way to learn/teach and encourage future leadersFuture aspirations and opportunities for your global workforceOffer insight into organization’s or company’s strategic directions“I’m interested in what and how you are doing”While learning about differences among groups helps us work together better..get to know people as individuals if you want to work most effectively with them.
  • Intergenerational Networking

    1. 1. Spanning Crucial Conversations Across the Generations Intergenerational Networking by Nykky McCarley, Life Coach at Future State www.myfuturestate.com
    2. 2. What this means… Complexions of the US Workforce Senior management is:  Having trouble relating to younger generations  Re-evaluating retention & engagement policies  Trying to facilitate knowledge transfer among employees Boomers (’45-’65) ~80 Million Gen X (’64-’81) ~51 Million Millennials (’82-’01) ~70 Million Experienced applicants are:  Having trouble relating to younger hiring managers  Re-evaluating how to convey talents during the interview ©2013 Nycletha McCarley All rights reserved.
    3. 3. Need to FosterBetter Communication tweeting@yemyem88 IWantMyMTV! ThatIsSoOldSchool!GenerationalGap BackInMyDay MoneyNeverSleepsPal AGlitchInTheMatrix PowerToThePeople The fourgenerations of workers that comprise the workforce rarely interact with one another & do not recognize each other’s skills or work ethic. – Randstad’s USA’s annual 2008 World of Work survey The Outcome?  A lack of knowledge sharing & transference  Impacts organizational performance  Jeopardizes company sustainability ©2013 Nycletha McCarley All rights reserved.
    4. 4. the generations the generations the generations &their characteristics & your personal assessment & tips for communication LearningOutcomes ©2013 Nycletha McCarley All rights reserved.
    5. 5. Generation Environment Values Traditionals (1922-1945)  Came of age in the Great Depression  Pulled together to win WWII  Created the greatest industrial & economic boom in history  Pursuit of the American Dream  Dedication  Delayed gratification  Loyalty, duty  Respect for authority  Hard work Baby Boomers (1946-1964)  Raised in the 1950s with prosperity  “Leave It To Beaver” mentality  Came of age:1960’s & early 70’s  Affected by the Vietnam War  1980s: Hippy to Yuppie, “BMW Culture”  Early 1990s - laid off, disillusioned  Optimism  Team work  Self actualization  Work & achievement  Health & youthfulness  Successful retirement The Generations Who are they? ©2013 Nycletha McCarley All rights reserved.
    6. 6. Generation Environment Values Generation X (1965-1979)  Raised by Dual Income or Single Boomer parents  Victims of educational experimentation  Lacked a defining event or hero  Latchkey kids  Fun  Independence  Informality  Technology  Work/Life balance (WLB)  Dislike of corporate politics Millennials (1980-2001)  Coming of age now  Nurtured by soccer moms, engaged dads  Raised to multi-task  Best educated generation in history  Raised on technology  Optimism, Morality  Flexibility, WLB  Chief Friendship Officers  Achievement, recognition  Family, friends first  Social consciousness The Generations Who are they? ©2013 Nycletha McCarley All rights reserved.
    7. 7. Personal/Lifestyle Characteristics Traditionals (1922–1945) Baby Boomers (1946–1964) Generation Xers (1965–1979) Millennials (1980–2001) Leadership Style Directive Consensual Equality; Ask why TBD Interactive Style Individual Team player Entrepreneur Participative Communication Formal memo In person Direct; Immediate EM, Txt, VM Communication Media Rotary phones Face time TT phone Call me anytime Cell phone Call me at work I-net; smart phones; Gaming systems Messages that motivate “Your experience is respected” “You are valued; You are needed” “Do it your way; Forget the rules” “You will work w/ other bright, creative people” Work & Family Separate Work to live Work-life balance Work-life balance Work is An obligation An exciting adventure A difficult challenge A means to an end Educational A dream A birthright Means to an end Expensive requirement Feedback & Rewards No news is good news Don’t appreciate it; want $$, title Need feedback; want freedom Continuous feedback Dealing w/ $$$ Put it away Pay cash Buy now, pay later Cautious Conservative Earn to spend
    8. 8. Personal/Lifestyle Characteristics Traditionals (1922–1945) Baby Boomers (1946–1964) Generation Xers (1965–1979) Millennials (1980–2001) Leadership Style Directive Consensual Equality; Ask why TBD Interactive Style Individual Team player Entrepreneur Participative Communication Formal memo In person Direct; Immediate EM, Txt, VM Communication Media Rotary phones Face time TT phone Call me anytime Cell phone Call me at work I-net; smart phones; Gaming systems Messages that motivate “Your experience is respected” “You are valued; You are needed” “Do it your way; Forget the rules” “You will work w/ other bright, creative people” Work & Family Separate Work to live Work-life balance Work-life balance Work is An obligation An exciting adventure A difficult challenge A means to an end Educational A dream A birthright Means to an end Expensive requirement Feedback & Rewards No news is good news Don’t appreciate it; want $$, title Need feedback; want freedom Continuous feedback Dealing w/ $$$ Putit away Pay cash Buy now, pay later Cautious Conservative Earn to spend
    9. 9. Personal/Lifestyle Characteristics Traditionals (1922–1945) Baby Boomers (1946–1964) Generation Xers (1965–1979) Millennials (1980–2001) Leadership Style Directive Consensual Equality; Ask why TBD Interactive Style Individual Team player Entrepreneur Participative Communication Formal memo In person Direct; Immediate EM, Txt, VM Communication Media Rotary phones Face time TT phone Call me anytime Cell phone Call me at work I-net; smart phones; Gaming systems Messages that motivate “Your experience is respected” “You are valued; You are needed” “Do it your way; Forget the rules” “You will work w/ other bright, creative people” Work & Family Separate Work to live Work-life balance Work-life balance Work is An obligation An exciting adventure A difficult challenge A means to an end Educational A dream A birthright Means to an end Expensive requirement Feedback & Rewards No news is good news Don’t appreciate it; want $$, title Need feedback; want freedom Continuous feedback Dealing w/ $$$ Putit away Pay cash Buy now, pay later Cautious Conservative Earn to spend
    10. 10. Personal/Lifestyle Characteristics Traditionals (1922–1945) Baby Boomers (1946–1964) Generation Xers (1965–1979) Millennials (1980–2001) Leadership Style Directive Consensual Equality; Ask why TBD Interactive Style Individual Team player Entrepreneur Participative Communication Formal memo In person Direct; Immediate EM, Txt, VM Communication Media Rotary phones Face time TT phone Call me anytime Cell phone Call me at work I-net; smart phones; Gaming systems Messages that motivate “Your experience is respected” “You are valued; You are needed” “Do it your way; Forget the rules” “You work w/ other bright, creative people” Work & Family Separate Work to live Work-life balance Work-life balance Work is An obligation An exciting adventure A difficult challenge A means to an end Educational A dream A birthright Means to an end Expensive requirement Feedback & Rewards No news is good news Don’t appreciate it; want $$, title Need feedback; want freedom Continuous feedback Putit away Cautious
    11. 11. the generations the generations the generations &their characteristics & your personal assessment & tips for communication LearningOutcomes ©2013 Nycletha McCarley All rights reserved.
    12. 12. ©2013 Nycletha McCarley All rights reserved.
    13. 13. the generations the generations the generations &their characteristics & your personal assessment & tips for communication LearningOutcomes ©2013 Nycletha McCarley All rights reserved.
    14. 14. Personal/ Lifestyle Characteristics Traditionals (1922–1945) Baby Boomers (1946–1964) Generation X (1965–1979) Millennials (1980–2001) Leadership Style Directive Military Consensual Collegial Equality Challenge others Ask why Prescriptive Consensual Ask why not? Work Ethic & Values Hard Work Respect Authority Sacrifice Duty before fun Adhere to rules Workaholics Crusading causes Personal fulfillment Desire quality Question authority Eliminate the task Self-reliance Want structure & direction Skeptical What’s next? Multitasking Tenacity Entrepreneurial Tolerant Goal oriented Work & Family Life Separate Work to live Work-life balance Work-life balance Feedback & Rewards No news is good news; satisfaction in a job well done Don’t appreciate it; want $$, title Need feedback Want freedom Continuous feedback Meaningful work Common Clash Points ©2013 Nycletha McCarley All rights reserved.
    15. 15. IntergenerationalNetworking CommunicationTips Traditionals (1922-1945) Direct eye contact Recognize with a personal touch Be patient when training Communicate using traditional values Let them know you value their experiences Stress the long haul Say please & thank you Boomers (1946-1964) Challenge them to create change They like to know they can make a difference Get to know them Publicly recognize Coach rather than direct them Respect their experience ©2013 Nycletha McCarley All rights reserved.
    16. 16. IntergenerationalNetworking CommunicationTips Generation X (1965-1979) WLB is important Freedom/independence are motivating factors Embrace change Enjoy fun & excitement Seek independent training Seek mentors Millennials (1980-2001) Structure & supervision Understanding of their goals A clear picture of what is acceptable & what is not Frequent rewards & recognition FUN! ©2013 Nycletha McCarley All rights reserved.
    17. 17. Role Play – Scenario 1  The players: Millennial recruiter, Baby Boomer applicant  The scene: Interview  The situation: During the interview, the BB answers the questions fully, but then over shares re: her experiences.  The reaction: The Millennial, somewhat overwhelmed by the BB, is not comfortable with this applicant & is no longer paying attention. Food for thought: Why was the Millennial overwhelmed? What drives the Boomer to over share? What insights can be leveraged to facilitate a successful conversation?
    18. 18. Baby Boomers Characteristics Millennials Consensual Collegial Leadership Style Prescriptive Consensual Ask why not? Workaholics Crusaders Personal fulfillment Desire quality Question authority Work Ethic & Values What’s next? Multitasking Tenacity Entrepreneurial Tolerant Goal oriented Work to live Work & Family Life Work-life balance Don’t appreciate it; want $$, title Feedback & Rewards Continuous feedback Meaningful work Role Play – Scenario 1 Deconstructed ©2013 Nycletha McCarley All rights reserved.
    19. 19. 5 Tipsfor Interviewing w/Millennials IntergenerationalNetworking ©2013 Nycletha McCarley All rights reserved.
    20. 20. Role Play – Scenario 2  The players: Gen X team lead, Millennial individual contributor  The scene: A routine 1:1  The situation: The Millennial, who has been working for about a year, updates the manager on work progress. He then tells the Gen Xerhe is not receiving enough visibility to senior management.  The reaction: The Gen Xer is surprised, not understanding why the Millennial would expect such recognition. Food for thought Why was the Gen Xer surprised? Why were the Millennial’s expectations so high? What insights could be leveraged to facilitate a successful conversation?
    21. 21. Generation X Characteristics Millennials Equality Challenge others Ask why Leadership Style Prescriptive Consensual Ask why not? Eliminate the task Self-reliance Want structure & direction Skeptical Work Ethic & Values What’s next? Multitasking Tenacity Entrepreneurial Tolerant Goal oriented Work-life balance Work & Family Life Work-life balance Need feedback Want freedom Feedback & Rewards Continuous feedback Meaningful work ©2013 Nycletha McCarley All rights reserved. Role Play – Scenario 2 Deconstructed
    22. 22. 5 Tipsfor Interviewing w/Gen X IntergenerationalNetworking ©2013 Nycletha McCarley All rights reserved.
    23. 23. Create Generational Chemistry Use Insights Recognize the Generations Traditionals, Baby boomers Generation X, Millennials Clash Points & Tips Networking, Job Search, Family Intergenerational Networking…Spanning Crucial Communications Across the Generations InConclusion ©2013 Nycletha McCarley All rights reserved.
    24. 24. Thank You! Nykky McCarley, Life Coach LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/nykkymccarley Website: myfuturestate.com Blog: yourfuturestate.wordpress.com Presentations: slideshare.net/nmccam Email: nykky@myfuturestate.com ©2013 Nycletha McCarley All rights reserved.

    ×