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Managing People - Neighborhood Excellence Initiative BofA

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Managing People for Results by Nelson Layag, CompassPoint Nonprofit Services. For the Neighborhood Excellence Initiative for Emerging Leaders, May 18, 2011

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Managing People - Neighborhood Excellence Initiative BofA

  1. 1. Managing People to Achieve Results<br />Nelson L. Layag<br />Project Director<br />nelsonl@compasspoint.org<br />Bank of America Neighborhood Excellence Initiative®<br />Neighborhood Excellence Leadership Program® <br />May 17-20, 2011<br />
  2. 2.
  3. 3. What makes things happen in your organization?<br />
  4. 4. Photo: Garrett Coakley, Flickr<br />
  5. 5. Photo: Steve Rhodes, Flickr<br />
  6. 6. Photo: ReSurge International, Flickr<br />
  7. 7. Responsibilities of a supervisor<br />Delegation<br />Coaching <br />Effective Feedback<br />Elements of an effective evaluation process<br />Topics<br />
  8. 8. “CompassPoint – We’ve got frameworks & matrices”<br />
  9. 9.
  10. 10. Photo: St. Gallen Symposium, Flickr<br />
  11. 11.
  12. 12. REFLECT<br />BEST<br />SUPERVISION<br />MOMENT<br />...as a supervisor or supervisee<br />
  13. 13. Managing<br />vs<br />Leading<br />
  14. 14. Managing<br />AND<br />Leading<br />
  15. 15.  <br />“Credibility is the foundation of leadership”<br /> - Kouzes & Posner<br />Honest<br />Forward-looking<br />Competent<br />Inspiring<br />
  16. 16. Five Practices of Exemplary Leadership<br /> <br />MODEL the Way<br />INSPIRE a Shared Vision<br />CHALLENGE the Process<br />ENABLE Others to Act<br />ENCOURAGE the Heart<br />
  17. 17. How do your management practices influence and/or support your leadership practices?<br />
  18. 18. Supervision & Nonprofits <br />The ultimate responsibility of a supervisor is to help the employee manage his/her relationship with the organization so that each is successful. <br />
  19. 19. The Managing People Framework<br />Expectation Setting<br /><ul><li>Reviewing & revising job descriptions
  20. 20. Delegating responsibilities
  21. 21. Reviewing & revising performance work plans
  22. 22. Creating professional development plan
  23. 23. Assigning a project
  24. 24. New staff orientation
  25. 25. Setting annual goals</li></ul>Mutual<br />Strengths-based<br />Multiculturalism<br />Organizational Culture<br />Political Framework<br />Leadership beliefs<br />Field or Mission<br />Regular Communications<br /><ul><li>Identifying & resolving problems
  26. 26. Giving timely appreciative and developmental feedback
  27. 27. Discussing current projects/workload & upcoming deadlines
  28. 28. Coaching</li></ul>Ongoing<br />Performance Review<br /><ul><li>Quarterly performance review meetings
  29. 29. Annual performance reviews
  30. 30. Setting annual goals</li></ul>No Surprises<br />
  31. 31. How much time do you spend “supervising” people?<br />
  32. 32. How much time do you spend “supervising” people?<br />
  33. 33. How much time do you spend “supervising” people?<br />
  34. 34. How does the “lens” influence practice?<br />Strengths-based<br />Multiculturalism<br />Organizational Culture<br />Political Framework<br />Leadership beliefs<br />Field or Mission<br />
  35. 35. Expectation Setting<br /><ul><li>Reviewing & revising job descriptions
  36. 36. Delegating responsibilities
  37. 37. Reviewing & revising performance work plans
  38. 38. Creating professional development plan
  39. 39. Assigning a project
  40. 40. New staff orientation
  41. 41. Setting annual goals</li></ul>Mutual<br />
  42. 42. Setting and Communicating Expectations<br />In order for employees to understand your expectations, you have to communicate them in terms of BEHAVIORSor OUTCOMES.<br />
  43. 43. I’m a strategic thinker and problem solver<br />Photo: RebekahPavlovic, Flikr<br />
  44. 44. I’m a strategic thinker and problem solver<br />
  45. 45. Sshh…strategic thinker and problem solver at work<br />
  46. 46. Being on time for a <br />9:30 meeting<br />
  47. 47.
  48. 48. Setting and Communicating Expectations<br />
  49. 49. Groups of 3 <br />What does it look like when someone is . . . <br />creative?<br /> proactive?<br /> strategic?<br />
  50. 50.
  51. 51.
  52. 52. Delegation Framework<br />
  53. 53. Situational Leadership<br />© 2003. Ken Blanchard Companies. All rights reserved. For a more in depth understanding of matching leadership styles with development levels see Situational Leadership II by The Ken Blanchard Companies. The accompanying diagram above is derived from Situational Leadership II.<br />
  54. 54. Do you consider all these factors to determine how to delegate responsibilities?<br />
  55. 55. Regular Communications<br /><ul><li>Identifying & resolving problems
  56. 56. Giving timely appreciative and developmental feedback
  57. 57. Discussing current projects/workload & upcoming deadlines
  58. 58. Coaching</li></ul>Ongoing<br />
  59. 59. Why Coaching?<br />The mark of effective leadership is not an individual who “does it all”; rather, it’s the full leadership team that fuels high performance over the long haul.<br /> - Sylvia Yee, Evelyn and Walter Haas, Jr. Fund<br />
  60. 60. Coaching is…<br />A process of supporting individuals to make more conscious decisions <br />The ultimate goal of coaching is to help someone move to a new action or behavior while learning, growing and developing.<br />
  61. 61. Coaching is not…<br />The new beginning<br />The neutral zone<br />Ending, <br />losing,<br />letting go<br />
  62. 62. Action Learning Model<br />Action<br />Learning<br />Reflection<br />
  63. 63.
  64. 64.
  65. 65. Four Kinds of Listening<br />Superficial Listening<br />Fix-It Listening<br />Self-Referential Listening<br />
  66. 66. Engaged Listening<br />Photo: Nancy White, Flickr<br />
  67. 67. Exercise: Engaged Listening<br />Speaker: What do you love about being a leader?<br />Listener: Practice listening at the deepest level (engaged listening). - <br />What do you love about discovering what you are capable of?<br />What do you love about the challenge?<br />What do you love about how you are learning and growing?<br />What do you love about mentoring your staff?<br />What are the talents and strengths that give you the most joy?<br />Who are your partners and how important are they to you?<br />
  68. 68. Debrief<br />Listener: <br />Did you slip into other types of listening?<br />What did it feel like?<br />Speaker:<br />What did it feel like to have someone listen without interruption?<br />
  69. 69. Inquiring<br />Who?<br />What?<br />When?<br />Where?<br />How?<br /><ul><li>Is?
  70. 70. Can?
  71. 71. Are?
  72. 72. Will?</li></ul>9%<br />90%<br />1%<br /><ul><li>Why?</li></li></ul><li>Exercise: Open-Ended Questions<br />Speaker: Share a best moment in your leadership or in your life. A peak experience -- A time when you were feeling confident and challenged in a good way. <br />Listener: Use open-ended questions to help draw the story out of the speaker.<br />What Where<br />When Who<br />How<br />
  73. 73. Regular Communications<br /><ul><li>Identifying & resolving problems
  74. 74. Giving timely appreciative and developmental feedback
  75. 75. Discussing current projects/workload & upcoming deadlines
  76. 76. Coaching</li></ul>Ongoing<br />
  77. 77. Photo: katselvocki / lemony kickit<br />
  78. 78. Giving and Receiving Ongoing Feedback <br />Timely (as soon as possible)<br />Specific (what has occurred and the impact)<br />Focus on behaviors, not on person’s character<br />Impact (i.e. It Matters)<br />
  79. 79. Supportive or Positive Feedback<br />Instead of :<br />“You really handled that tough situation with the client well. Thanks, you’re awesome!”<br /> <br />
  80. 80. Photo: Sasha Wolff, Flickr<br />
  81. 81. Supportive or Positive Feedback<br />Try:<br />“I really want to tell you how impressed I was with the way you handled the client’s problem. You were able to calm him down by being patient and letting the client see that you were willing to take the time to help him. That helped get to the issue at hand and then you were able to direct him to the right person who could help. Thank you.”  <br />
  82. 82. Photo: Sasha Wolff, Flickr<br />
  83. 83. Supportive or Positive Feedback<br />Instead of : <br /> “You were great in that meeting, thanks.”<br /> <br />
  84. 84. Supportive or Positive Feedback<br />Try: <br />“When you were clear and concise while explaining your idea at the meeting, it really helped the management team to focus on key points and understand the benefits of your proposal more clearly. That will help us make a well informed decision on this idea. Thank you for being so prepared.”<br /> <br />
  85. 85. Exercise: Feedback<br />Speaker: Share a piece of feedback with listener<br />Listener: Help speaker to do the following<br />Remove judgment (positive or negative)<br />Stay objective<br />Use specific, observable language<br />Add meaning or impact<br />
  86. 86. Corrective/Negative Feedback<br /><ul><li>As soon as possible 
  87. 87. Connect the behavior to the impact 
  88. 88. Be specific and avoid generalities
  89. 89. Give feedback in person when able. Email or phone messages can also be appropriate
  90. 90. Be prepared to engage in problem solving
  91. 91. Express confidence (positive statement) that the person can correct her/his behavior. Not to be mistaken for positive feedback.</li></li></ul><li>Go Low Carb on the Feedback<br />
  92. 92. Go Low Carb on the Feedback<br />
  93. 93. Corrective/Negative Feedback<br />James, I would like to speak to you for a moment about today’s meeting with our funder. When you don’t prepare properly, it comes off as unprofessional. This hurts the image of the organization and our ability to secure the funding we need to support our mission. Thank you for listening to this feedback, I really think you can be great in this role. <br />
  94. 94. Corrective/Negative Feedback<br />You: James, I would like to speak to you for a moment about today’s meeting with our funder. When you don’t prepare properly, it comes off as unprofessional. <br />James: What do you mean?<br />You: Well, there were a few major typos in the budget and you didn’t have the information about the total service numbers for last year. <br />
  95. 95. Corrective/Negative Feedback<br />James: I did show you the draft of the budget.<br />You: What do you think you need to be better prepared?<br />James: Maybe next time we can go over what we should prepare for this meeting the day before so I understand what we need. I can also get someone to look over the material for any mistakes too.<br />
  96. 96. Corrective/Negative Feedback<br />You: Good idea. Being better prepared will help our ability to secure the funding we need to support our mission. Thank you for listening to this feedback, I really think you can be great in this role. <br />
  97. 97. Anxiety or Fear?<br />What are some tactics you can use for support when you need to give developmental feedback?<br />
  98. 98.
  99. 99. Performance Review<br /><ul><li>Quarterly performance review meetings
  100. 100. Annual performance reviews</li></ul>No Surprises<br />
  101. 101.
  102. 102.
  103. 103.
  104. 104. Maria was promoted to Program Manager in late 2007 after one year as a counselor. Since then she has proven that she not only can accomplish the specific duties and responsibilities assigned with that position, but has the ability to be proactive in looking for and implementing ways to improve the organization’s ability to serve its clients. One clear example of this is the I & R database project which has been in the organization’s plan for the last 2 years but which was never completed for various reasons including complexity of the project, costs, and lack of anyone being responsible for it being done. We decided to put this as one of her responsibilities earlier this year and because of her ability to recognize and focus on the client’s needs and level of accessibility she was able to take a simple, low cost approach of using blogging software to make a highly accessible, easily modifiable (and easy to learn) system for looking up I&R resources. <br />As a counselor, Maria demonstrated a knack for managing conflicts for our youth. She’s brought that talent to her new role, but we recognize that she has never received any formal training (not her fault) in this area and feel she can not only excel in conflict resolution, but could in time provide effective coaching and training to the staff of counselors she supervises. We might consider some formal supervision training as well as part of her professional development plan.<br />One area of focus we should consider is the quality control issue of our workshops. Maria has been very effective in getting the schedule of workshops completed much earlier than what the past standard has been. However, there have been sacrifices in reviewing the quality of the material in exchange for getting presenters scheduled quickly. We have discussed a process in which scheduling can happen effectively while being able to review content on a timely basis and how the Program Director (me) can be supportive in that process. We will include this in her next version of the workplan.<br />
  105. 105. Elements of an Effective Evaluation Process<br />Credible - Based on communicated expectations (performance workplan).<br />Reliable – Staff understands the process and it happens.<br />Fair - All staff are being evaluated in a similar fashion (not necessarily equally).<br />Practical - NOT just paperwork, but matters. Also, not difficult to understand and complete (correctly).<br />
  106. 106. Elements of an Effective Evaluation Process<br />On Going - Staff is evaluated throughout the year (even if the paperwork just happens quarterly/annually).<br />Transparency - Everyone understands the process, and how, who, when, and what performance is based on.<br />Collaborative - Requires points of view from you, the staff person and others who work closely with staff.<br />
  107. 107. The Managing People Framework<br />Expectation Setting<br /><ul><li>Reviewing & revising job descriptions
  108. 108. Delegating responsibilities
  109. 109. Reviewing & revising performance work plans
  110. 110. Creating professional development plan
  111. 111. Assigning a project
  112. 112. New staff orientation
  113. 113. Setting annual goals</li></ul>Mutual<br />Strengths-based<br />Multiculturalism<br />Organizational Culture<br />Political Framework<br />Leadership beliefs<br />Field or Mission<br />Regular Communications<br /><ul><li>Identifying & resolving problems
  114. 114. Giving timely appreciative and developmental feedback
  115. 115. Discussing current projects/workload & upcoming deadlines
  116. 116. Coaching</li></ul>Ongoing<br />Performance Review<br /><ul><li>Quarterly performance review meetings
  117. 117. Annual performance reviews
  118. 118. Setting annual goals</li></ul>No Surprises<br />
  119. 119. How are these elements working in your evaluation system? <br />What is a priority for you to address?<br />
  120. 120.
  121. 121. Responsibilities of a supervisor<br />Delegation<br />Coaching <br />Effective Feedback<br />Elements of an effective evaluation process<br />Topics<br />
  122. 122. How do your management practices influence and/or support your leadership practices?<br />
  123. 123.  <br />“Credibility is the foundation of leadership”<br /> - Kouzes & Posner<br />Honest<br />Forward-looking<br />Competent<br />Inspiring<br />
  124. 124. Five Practices of Exemplary Leadership<br /> <br />MODEL the Way<br />INSPIRE a Shared Vision<br />CHALLENGE the process<br />ENABLE Others to Act<br />ENCOURAGE The Heart<br />
  125. 125. How do your management practices influence and/or support your leadership practices?<br />
  126. 126. Managing<br />AND<br />Leading<br />
  127. 127. Presentation and Additional Resources <br />Feel free to email (or tweet) me with additional questions<br />nelsonl@compasspoint.org<br />Twitter.com/nlayag<br /> . . . And one last thing . . .<br />
  128. 128. George <br />Kissed <br />Paula <br />“. . . small victories can often trigger a positive spiral of behavior . . .”<br />
  129. 129. What could be your one kiss?<br />

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