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NJFuture Redevelopment Forum 2016 Mallach

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Presentation from Gentrification vs. Homogenization

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NJFuture Redevelopment Forum 2016 Mallach

  1. 1. GENTRIFICATION: A SHORT INTRODUCTION ALAN MALLACH, SENIOR FELLOW CENTER FOR COMMUNITY PROGRESS NEW JERSEY REDEVELOPMENT FORUM MARCH 11, 2016
  2. 2. WHAT IS GENTRIFICATION? A fuzzy, often pejorative term – “the most loaded, least understood word in urban policy” (Emily Badger) Most definitions are about displacement. Working definition: “increased housing costs and demographic change in lower- income neighborhoods resulting from in- migration of more affluent households.”
  3. 3. WHAT IS GENTRIFICATION?  Gentrification may involve public sector intervention, but is basically a market-driven phenomenon.  Gentrification is one dimension of an ongoing process of urban neighborhood change, which is constantly taking place, and moves in all directions.  Gentrification is not the same as redevelopment of downtowns and other previously non-residential areas into residential neighborhoods.
  4. 4. WHAT ARE THE KEY ISSUES?  Displacement  Loss of affordable housing  Change of community character, or ‘cultural’ displacement Question: when should these become matters for public action?
  5. 5. NATIONAL TRENDS 1 “Hyper-Gentrification” in a handful of places: Brooklyn, Washington DC, San Francisco Sales price increase by 25% or more from 2009 to 2014 by zip code
  6. 6. NATIONAL TRENDS 2 More limited, incremental gentrification, along with widespread neighborhood decline, in many older cities, like Baltimore, Philadelphia, St. Louis or Cleveland Sales price decline by 15% or more from 2009 to 2014 by zip code
  7. 7. BALTIMORE Scattered pockets of what may be gentrification
  8. 8. WHAT ABOUT NEW JERSEY? Outside of Jersey City, little evidence of gentrification in New Jersey’s larger urban centers. Yet, New Jersey has its share of people looking for urban, walkable places – Where is that demand being satisfied?
  9. 9. WHAT ABOUT NEW JERSEY? New Jersey’s ‘quasi-urban’ municipalities – smaller, safer, places with walkable centers, like Red Bank, Montclair or Morristown, are filling the gap.
  10. 10. A CLOSING QUESTION Are we likely to see significant urban gentrification in New Jersey in the near future, as distinct from downtown redevelopment?

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