NJFuture Redevelopment Forum 13 Shore Rebuilding Mauriello

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NJFuture Redevelopment Forum 13 Shore Rebuilding Mauriello

  1. 1. Mark N. MaurielloDirector of Environmental Affairs and Planning Edgewood Properties
  2. 2. NJ LANDSAT IMAGERY (1995)
  3. 3. COASTAL ZONE PLANNING CHALLENGES Relative Sea Level Is Rising…More Than One Foot Per Century Negative Sediment Budgets Result In Chronic Shoreline Erosion Development And Impervious Cover Are Increasing Flood Hazard Areas Are Increasing Tendency To Underestimate Hazards And Vulnerability…And Regulate Accordingly High Density of People and Property at Risk Extreme Weather Events Are Occurring More Frequently
  4. 4. Frequency – Recurrence Interval Natural Hazard Probabilities During Periods of Various Lengths (FEMA, 2001) The percentages shown represent the probabilities of one or more occurrences of an event of a given magnitude or larger within the specified period. As the length of the period increases, so does the probability that floods of a given magnitude or greater will occur. 10 – Year 25 – Year 50 – Year 100 – Year 500 – Year Event Event Event Event Event LengthOf Period1 Year 10% 4% 2% 1% 0.2%10 Years 65% 34% 18% 10% 2%20 Years 88% 56% 33% 18% 5%25 Years 93% 64% 40% 22% 5%30 Years 96% 71% 45% 26% 6%50 Years 99+% 87% 64% 39% 10%70 Years 99.94+% 94% 76% 50% 13%100 Years 99.99+% 98% 87% 63% 18%
  5. 5. SANDY DYNAMICSFRIDAY OCTOBER 26 MONDAY OCTOBER 29
  6. 6. BACKBAY FLOODINGSHIP BOTTOM WARETOWN
  7. 7. ORTLEY BEACHMINIMAL SETBACKS AND DUNES
  8. 8. BUILDING FAILUREMINIMUM STANDARDS
  9. 9. BUILDING FAILUREMINIMUM STANDARDS
  10. 10. ORTLEY BEACHHIGHER STANDARDS
  11. 11. BRICK TOWNSHIP
  12. 12. BUILDING FAILUREMINIMUM STANDARDS
  13. 13. BRICK TOWNSHIPHIGHER STANDARDS
  14. 14. MANTOLOKINGTHE BAD AND THE GOOD
  15. 15. MANTOLOKINGDUNES AND SETBACKS
  16. 16. MIDWAY BEACHDUNES AND SETBACKS
  17. 17. A ZONE FOUNDATION MITIGATION WOODBRIDGE (BFE=9’ - FF=12’) IRENE SANDY
  18. 18. URBAN AREA FLOODING
  19. 19. STORMWATER MANAGEMENT CONCERNS BACKFLOW WATER QUALITY
  20. 20. POST-STORM RECONSTRUCTION CHALLENGES Where To Rebuild: Land Losses, Critical Erosion Areas, Overwash Areas, Inlet Breaches How To Rebuild: Construction Standards, Foundation Types, Structural Elevations, Freeboard Implications Of Advisory Flood Hazard Data: ABFEs And SFHAs Structural Elevations And Zoning Conflicts: Height Limits, ADA, Historic Districts, Bulk Limits, Setbacks Non-Conforming Uses Reconciling Agency Roles: Federal/State/Municipal
  21. 21. IMPORTANCE OF MULTI-HAZARD MITIGATION PLANNINGThe purpose of mitigation planning is to identifypolicies and actions that can be implementedover the long term to reduce risk and futurelosses. Mitigation Plans form the foundation for acommunitys long-term strategy to reducedisaster losses and break the cycle of disasterdamage, reconstruction, and repeated damage.The planning process is as important as the planitself. It creates a framework for risk-baseddecision making to reduce damages to lives,property, and the economy from future disasters.
  22. 22. HMGP FUNDING BASED ON APPROVED PLANSHazard mitigation planning is an important aspect ofa successful mitigation program. A fundamentalcomponent of the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000(DMA2K) is the emphasis on planning. The State iseligible for up to 15% of the overall federal disasterexpenditures if the State has an approved Standard AllHazards Mitigation Plan. Hazard mitigation planningis a collaborative process whereby hazards affectingthe community are identified, vulnerability to thehazards is assessed, and consensus reached on how tominimize or eliminate the effects of these hazards.
  23. 23. HAZARD MITIGATION STRATEGIES Acquisition And Relocation Higher Regulatory Standards Land Use Management Natural Resource Enhancement And Restoration Floodproofing And Retrofitting Training, Education And Outreach Community Rating System (CRS) Legislation
  24. 24. NFIP REFORM ACT OF 2012 INSURANCE PREMIUMSBASED ON $250,000 BUILDING COVERAGE, WITHOUT & WITH* $100,000 CONTENTS COVERAGE (EFFECTIVE JANUARY 2013) A-Zone V-Zone Lowest Floor Elevation Annual Premium Annual Premium 3 feet above $376 $561* $2,403 $2,923* 2 feet above $448 $633* $3,278 $4,048* 1 foot above $660 $845* $4,728 $5,918* At BFE $1,359 $1,724* $6,803 $8,603* 1 foot below $4,527 $5,255* $9,003 $11,583* 2 feet below $5,924 $8,308* $12,074 $15,764* 3 feet below $7,204 $10,554* $15,524 $20,474* 4 feet below $9,551 $14,370* $17,334 $23,304* 6 feet below $18,830 $28,535* $23,449 $32,019*
  25. 25. FINAL THOUGHTS SANDY REMINDS US THAT NJ REMAINS EXTREMELY VULNERABLE TO COASTAL STORMS AND FLOODING THIS VULNERABILITY WILL INCREASE OVER TIME DUE TO FUTURE CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SEA LEVEL RISE…“TODAY’S FLOOD IS TOMORROW’S HIGH TIDE” COMPREHENSIVE PLANNING AND HAZARD MITIGATION CAN ENHANCE FUTURE RESILIENCE PLANNING AND POLICY DECISIONS NEED TO CONSIDER LONG-TERM COSTS AND BENEFITS INCREMENTAL CHANGE IS GOOD…BUT WE NEED TO START NOW
  26. 26. CHANCE FAVORS THOSEWHO ARE BEST PREPARED!

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