NJFuture Redevelopment Forum 13 Infrastructure Strickland

468 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
468
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Image taken at Rockaway Beach on the evening of Monday, October 29, 2012.
  • Fire in Breezy Point – nearly 100 homes completely destroyed. Flooding limited firefighter access; damage to private water main network forced firefighters to pump seawater to fight fire. As the private water system became compromised, DEP employees arrived on location and directed FDNY to NYC water mains which had the pressures required to fight the fire.Major street and home flooding – 760 red tagged buildings (uninhabitable, structurally unsound); 6700 yellow tagged buildings (require major reconstruction)Transit system – Commuter rail and subway flooding and severe damage. Subways closed for two days after the storm, no subways in Lower Manhattan for five days.Seven subway tunnels under the East River flooded. Metro-North Railroad lost power from 59th Street to Croton-Harmon on the Hudson Line and to New Haven on the New Haven Line. The Long Island Rail Road evacuated its West Side Yards and suffered flooding in one East River tunnel. The Hugh L. Carey Tunnel is flooded from end to end and the Queens Midtown Tunnel also took on water and was closed. Six bus garages were disabled by high water.
  • Average Volume Capacity 300 CF (2250 gal.)Average Impervious Area Managed 3,600 SFAverage Design Costs per ROWB $6,000-$8,000/bioswale (includes Design, Geotechnical, & Survey) Average Construction Costs per ROWB (depending on allowances) $15,000-$25,000Construction Targets (approx.)2013: 1602015: 6,0002017: 7,500
  • DEP has committed $6.4 million to date and 19 projectsTwo projects complete; three starting construction this springRemaining 2011-2012 are in various design stages, most expected to be finished this spring.In the process of reviewing applications for the City’s third Green Infrastructure Grant Program and expect to announce winners on Earth Day 2013
  • NJFuture Redevelopment Forum 13 Infrastructure Strickland

    1. 1. The Future of Infrastructure Investments Carter StricklandCommissioner, NYC Department of Environmental Protection March 1, 2013
    2. 2. Climate Change Rockaway Beach2
    3. 3. Major Citywide Impacts 3
    4. 4. Historic Wetlands 4
    5. 5. Hurricane Sandy Flooding Area 5
    6. 6. Costs• $15.3B (66%) of capital commitments for 2002-2012 were driven by mandates• Mandates account for only 21% of the $6.6B 2013-2016 Capital Plan 2002-2016 Capital Expenditures and Debt Service Impact $4,000 $3,000 $ in Millions $2,000 $1,000 $0 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Fiscal Year Commitments Expenditures Net Debt Service 6
    7. 7. DEP Electricity Consumption• Between 2012-2017, electricity use is expected to increase by 289 million kWh (44%)• Most of the increase will come from the new Croton Filtration Plant and U/V Disinfection Facility 1000 900 U/V Facility 289 million 800 kWh Croton Filtration Plant 700 Manhattan PS Tallman Island kWh (in millions) 600 Owls Head Oakwood Beach 500 Hunts Point Coney Island 400 26th Ward Bowery Bay 300 Wards Island 200 Newtown Creek 100 Jamaica North River 0 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Fiscal YearRevised: 1/31/13 7
    8. 8. Sustainable Infrastructure Version 1.0 8
    9. 9. Utility of the Future 9
    10. 10. Grey Investments Newtown Creek WWTP Paerdegat Basin CSO FacilityMore than $10 billion in wastewater investments since 2002• $5 billion – Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant upgrade• $437 million – Paerdegat Basin CSO Facility• $500 million – Hunts Point Wastewater Treatment Plant upgrade and nutrient removal• $100 million – Nitrogen control upgrades at 26th Ward, Coney Island, and Rockaway wastewater treatment plants 10
    11. 11. Green InfrastructureGreen Roof Blue Roof Bioswale Porous Pavement 11 11
    12. 12. The Green Strategy Approach Performs Better GREEN STRATEGY GREY STRATEGY 30,000 2045 BASELINE - PROJECTION FROM 2007 FACILITY PLANS -5,666 built/under construction -5,666 built/under construction 25,000 -2,602 planned -2,547 plannedAnnual CSO Volume (millions of gallons) 21,698 -1,701 21,753 -1,945 19,808 20,000 -1,514 17,896 -586 15,000 10,000 5,000 - Cost-Effective Reduced Flow Green Optimize Green Strategy Cost-Effective Potential Tanks, Grey Strategy Grey Infrastructure Existing System Grey Tunnels, & Investments (10% Capture) Investments Expansions (Built & (Built & Planned) Planned) 12
    13. 13. The Green Strategy Costs Less$8.0$7.0 $6.8$6.0 $5.3 $0.03$5.0 $0.9 $3.9$4.0 $2.4 $1.5$3.0$2.0 $2.9 $2.9$1.0 $- Green Strategy Grey Strategy Potential Tanks, Tunnels, & Expansions Optimize Existing System Green Infrastructure - Private Investment Green Infrastructure - Public Investment Reduced Flow Cost-Effective Grey Investments 13
    14. 14. Long Term Control Plans Multi-Family Residential Planned Right-of-Way Housing (NYCHA) Projects (DOT)Public Schools (DOE) Parks & Playgrounds Community Gardens (DPR) (DPR) 14 14
    15. 15. Right of Way Bioswale 15
    16. 16. Performance of Bioswale System Percent Capture of 10 Bioswales Rainfall (in.) Mean Median Below 1” 73% 85% 1”-2” 25% 21% Above 2” 14% 12% Total 59% 60%• Percent of rainfall captured by 10 bioswales over 185 rain events.• Bioswales performed best during storms with less than one inch of rain. 16
    17. 17. Area-Wide Approach 17
    18. 18. Green Infrastructure Grant Program 18
    19. 19. Schoolyards to PlaygroundsBefore After 19
    20. 20. For more information visit www.nyc.gov/depFollow us on facebook at www.facebook.com/nycwater 20
    21. 21. 2121

    ×