Creating Places to Age in
New Jersey
Tim Evans
New Jersey Future
Redevelopment Forum 2014
March 14, 2014
New Jersey Future is a nonprofit, nonpartisan
organization that brings together concerned citizens
and leaders to promote ...
New Jersey Is Getting Older
As of 2012, more than 2.3 million New Jersey residents – 26.6
percent of the state’s populatio...
Aging and Land Use
From a land-use perspective, has New
Jersey built the kinds of places – and
built enough of them – that...
Aging-Friendliness and Land Use
1. Compactness of the development pattern
2. Presence of a mixed-use center
3. Street netw...
Aging-Friendliness and Land Use
1. Compactness of the development pattern
as measured by net activity density
= (populatio...
Aging-Friendliness and Land Use
2. Presence of a mixed-use center
as indicated by:
• designated center in the State Plan o...
Aging-Friendliness and Land Use
3. Street network connectivity
as measured by local road density
= route-miles of local ro...
Street network connectivity
• Connectivity is an important
measure of ped-friendliness
• Shore towns generally score
well,...
Street network connectivity
Aging-Friendliness and Land Use
4. Access to public transportation
as measured by local bus stops per square mile
Public t...
Aging-Friendliness and Land Use
1. Compactness of the development pattern
2. Presence of a mixed-use center
3. Street netw...
Compactness of the development pattern
Presence of a mixed-use center
Street network connectivity
Access to public transportation
Aging-
Friendliness and
Land Use
Good news: 31.3 percent of all New
Jersey residents aged 55 or older live in
one of the 1...
Aging-friendly, but not aging-ready
Aging-friendly, but not aging-ready
More than just land-use patterns:
• Housing types
• Housing unit size
• Housing afford...
Creating Places To Age
In places that already have “good bones”:
• Add to and diversify the housing stock
• Address safety...
Creating Places To Age
Thank you!
Tim Evans
Research Director
tevans@njfuture.org
New Jersey Future
137 W. Hanover St.
Trenton, N.J. 08618
609-39...
Who Lives in Downtown
Cranford?
New housing options brings more
empty nesters than expected.
Who is living in downtown Cranford in 2014?
3 new mixed-use projects & townhomes built since
2003 have brought a huge incr...
Is this a new trend in Cranford?
• No. Downtown residents have typically been divided
into two age groups: 55-63 yrs and 2...
What makes downtown living appealing?
• Familiarity
– downsize but remain in a place that is familiar, interesting
and eas...
What about all of the schoolchildren &
traffic problems?
• Not an issue & not an issue
– We know from our own Cranford eva...
The Dollars & Cents
• Providing downtown housing options pays off
for the municipality and local businesses
– Downtown res...
Nj future redevelopment forum 2014 places to age evans miller-prunty
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Nj future redevelopment forum 2014 places to age evans miller-prunty

  1. 1. Creating Places to Age in New Jersey Tim Evans New Jersey Future Redevelopment Forum 2014 March 14, 2014
  2. 2. New Jersey Future is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that brings together concerned citizens and leaders to promote responsible land-use policies. The organization employs original research, analysis and advocacy to build coalitions and drive land-use policies that help revitalize cities and towns, protect natural lands and farms, provide more transportation choices beyond cars, expand access to safe and affordable neighborhoods and fuel a prosperous economy.
  3. 3. New Jersey Is Getting Older As of 2012, more than 2.3 million New Jersey residents – 26.6 percent of the state’s population – were at least 55 years old, with more than half of that total over the age of 65 and nearly 200,000 being 85 or older.
  4. 4. Aging and Land Use From a land-use perspective, has New Jersey built the kinds of places – and built enough of them – that provide what older adults are likely to be seeking as they age?
  5. 5. Aging-Friendliness and Land Use 1. Compactness of the development pattern 2. Presence of a mixed-use center 3. Street network connectivity 4. Access to public transportation
  6. 6. Aging-Friendliness and Land Use 1. Compactness of the development pattern as measured by net activity density = (population + employment) / developed acres Higher activity density is better for older people because it puts destinations closer together, an important consideration for people with constraints on their mobility.
  7. 7. Aging-Friendliness and Land Use 2. Presence of a mixed-use center as indicated by: • designated center in the State Plan or Pinelands (or Highlands) • SID, BID, or “Main Street” organization • others meeting density threshold (e.g., Harrison, Keansburg, Lambertville, Bordentown, much of southern Bergen County) Town centers with multiple land use types in close proximity allow those with limited mobility, or with limited desire to drive, to maximize their trip-making by minimizing the distances among different types of destinations.
  8. 8. Aging-Friendliness and Land Use 3. Street network connectivity as measured by local road density = route-miles of local road / square mile Without connectivity, high density and mixed use can end up meaning that you can see your destination out your window but have to walk or drive a mile to get to it.
  9. 9. Street network connectivity • Connectivity is an important measure of ped-friendliness • Shore towns generally score well, despite having low year- round density
  10. 10. Street network connectivity
  11. 11. Aging-Friendliness and Land Use 4. Access to public transportation as measured by local bus stops per square mile Public transit access is presumed to be a plus for older people, because it offers them access to destinations to which they may not feel comfortable driving.
  12. 12. Aging-Friendliness and Land Use 1. Compactness of the development pattern 2. Presence of a mixed-use center 3. Street network connectivity 4. Access to public transportation The land-use characteristics that make a place good for older people are the same “smart-growth” features that make it easier for everybody to get around.
  13. 13. Compactness of the development pattern
  14. 14. Presence of a mixed-use center
  15. 15. Street network connectivity
  16. 16. Access to public transportation
  17. 17. Aging- Friendliness and Land Use Good news: 31.3 percent of all New Jersey residents aged 55 or older live in one of the 107 municipalities that score well on all four aging-friendliness development metrics. Bad news: 13.1 percent – almost 300,000 people – live in one of the 109 municipalities that score poorly on all four.
  18. 18. Aging-friendly, but not aging-ready
  19. 19. Aging-friendly, but not aging-ready More than just land-use patterns: • Housing types • Housing unit size • Housing affordability • Crime • Pedestrian safety (sidewalks, crosswalks, traffic light timing, vehicle speeds….)
  20. 20. Creating Places To Age In places that already have “good bones”: • Add to and diversify the housing stock • Address safety issues In places that score poorly: • Create brand-new “downtowns” (e.g. Robbinsville Town Center, Plainsboro) • Retrofit existing single-use development to make more mixed-use and ped-friendly (e.g. Willingboro, Echelon Mall, Somerdale)
  21. 21. Creating Places To Age
  22. 22. Thank you! Tim Evans Research Director tevans@njfuture.org New Jersey Future 137 W. Hanover St. Trenton, N.J. 08618 609-393-0008 ext. 103 http://www.njfuture.org
  23. 23. Who Lives in Downtown Cranford? New housing options brings more empty nesters than expected.
  24. 24. Who is living in downtown Cranford in 2014? 3 new mixed-use projects & townhomes built since 2003 have brought a huge increase in empty nesters calling downtown home . • Cranford Crossing – 50 luxury units • Riverfront at Cranford Station – 126 luxury units • 29 Alden – 14 luxury units • Northgate – 8 luxury townhomes • More than 80% empty nesters • Most from Cranford, Westfield & other nearby towns • 198 units / 3 children / 1 school age
  25. 25. Is this a new trend in Cranford? • No. Downtown residents have typically been divided into two age groups: 55-63 yrs and 23-32 yrs. The difference is the growing number of Baby Boomers. – 55 + yrs have traditionally occupied apartment and condo buildings in and surrounding downtown for many years – 55+ yrs are the predominant tenants of new luxury housing – 23-32 yrs typically occupy apartments above stores
  26. 26. What makes downtown living appealing? • Familiarity – downsize but remain in a place that is familiar, interesting and easier; close to family, friends, clubs, civic activities, doctors, gym, hairdresser, etc • Convenience/Active Lifestyle – Downtown offers easy access to stores, restaurants, churches, professional & personal services, library, community center, parks, bike paths, pools, tennis,etc. • Pedestrian & Transportation Oriented – Easy access/walk to above, rail & bus transportation
  27. 27. What about all of the schoolchildren & traffic problems? • Not an issue & not an issue – We know from our own Cranford evaluations that downtown residential projects have not added any significant numbers of school children – People living downtown are walking, not driving, to stores, restaurants, services, train etc.
  28. 28. The Dollars & Cents • Providing downtown housing options pays off for the municipality and local businesses – Downtown residents of all ages help to create a “downtown neighborhood” – In a 2013 survey, 60% of Cranford business owners said downtown residents support their business; 23% weren’t sure – Two redevelopment projects and several smaller housing projects have generated almost $90 million of private investment

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