NJ Future Forum 2012 Complete Streets Kremer

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The New Jersey Department of Transportation instituted a “Complete Streets” policy in 2009, joining a handful of other states that have adopted policies to plan, design and build state roads that are accessible to all users, not just cars. More than a dozen New Jersey local governments have followed suit, implementing policies that apply to local roads and streets. The city of Hoboken has been an early leader, becoming one of the first municipalities on the East Coast with a public bike repair facility and has doubled the number of bike racks near transit and striped its first “buffered” bike lane. Jersey City also has a Complete Streets policy and the city’s Route 440 boulevard project may serve as a valuable case study in renovating state highway corridors. Complete Streets policies have multiple benefits and have recently been identified as an obesity prevention tool by Shaping New Jersey and the New Jersey Partnership for Healthy Kids.

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NJ Future Forum 2012 Complete Streets Kremer

  1. 1. BUSINESS ROUTE 1 – BRUNSWICK PIKELAWRENCE TOWNSHIP, MERCER COUNTY, NEW JERSEY March 9, 2012
  2. 2. AGENDA• Location• Study Corridor• Vision• Timeline of accomplishments to date• Findings• Current status and next steps• Lessons learned
  3. 3. LOCATION• Lawrence Township, Mercer County• Typical of Central New Jersey Suburban• Focus area is one of three “downtowns”
  4. 4. REGIONAL CONTEXT• Regional context.pdf
  5. 5. LOCAL CONTEXT
  6. 6. BRUNSWICK TURNPIKE• Transportation issues – Excessive travel speeds – Limited pedestrian accommodations – Arterial highway design divides community• Land use issues – Many parcels pre-date zoning – Small, undersized lots – Some industrial sites close to Route 1 Freeway and D&R Canal – Some new development and redevelopment – Stable residential neighborhoods – Walkable elementary school … for some
  7. 7. RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOODS
  8. 8. PEDESTRIAN ACCESS
  9. 9. EXISTING ZONING
  10. 10. EXISTING DEVELOPMENT
  11. 11. POTENTIAL GATEWAY?
  12. 12. CORRIDOR VISION• Leverage redevelopment potential• Propose mixed use• Walkable design to promote pedestrian activity• Emphasize Gateway elements• Slow traffic speeds• Create a “Complete Street” linked to compatible land use elements
  13. 13. TIMELINE• 1994 – Growth management concept initiated• 1995 – Master Plan update• 1996 – Colonial Heights Civic Assoc. Vision• 1998 – Brunswick Pike Boulevard Study/ KMM TMA• 1998 – Redevelopment Area Report/Schoor DePalma• 1999 – Twp Council resolution designating redevelopment area• 2000 – Township traffic study• 2001 – Community forum/public meeting• 2002 – Student redevelopment visioning study• 2002 – Existing Conditions Study/NJDOT/Vollmer• 2000s – Various properties purchased and assembled• 2003,7 – Brunswick Pike South Vision Plan/Clarke Caton Hintz• 2010 – Concept Development Report/Stantec• 2011 – TCDI grant Redevelopment Plan & Form-based Zoning/CCH• 2011 – Final design contract initiated/Parsons Brinkerhoff• 2014 – TIP estimated start of construction
  14. 14. FINDINGS• Mismatch between roadway design and function• Traffic data consistently supports need for 4 lanes• Design to link of land use and transportation elements – Boulevard concept and redevelopment options• Design considerations – Left turns and medians – On-street parking – Traffic calming – Pedestrian accommodations – Must support redevelopment• Aesthetics critical concern for Township
  15. 15. CURRENT STATUS• Final ROW Plans – July 2012• Final Design Plans – January 2013• Advertise – December 2013• Construction – March 2014 to February 2015
  16. 16. LESSONS LEARNED• Consistent community support and vision• Need to link land use and transportation• Flexibility• Some design details and design exceptions still under consideration
  17. 17. BOULEVARD CONCEPT
  18. 18. WHITEHEAD ROAD ROUNDABOUT
  19. 19. FORM-BASED ZONING CODES• DVRPC grant• Redevelopment Plan• Predictability for Township and Developers• Emphasizes aesthetics and physical design as the organizing principal of redevelopment plan
  20. 20. Peter F. KremerSupervising Transportation PlannerParsons Brinkerhoff, Inc.609-512-3539kremer@pbworld.com

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