Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Safe Routes to School - Elise Bremer-Nei

847 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Safe Routes to School - Elise Bremer-Nei

  1. 1. Expanding the Complete Streets Network with Safe Routes to School Elise Bremer-Nei, AICP/PP NJDOT Safe Routes to School Coordinator NJ Complete Streets Summit - October 21, 2013
  2. 2. History of Safe Routes to School Mid-1970s Odense, Denmark      Worst child pedestrian crash rate in Europe Created a network of non-motorized paths Established slow speed areas, added traffic calming In 10 years, child casualties fell by 80% SRTS now implemented in 65 Danish towns
  3. 3. 1995 – Great Britain      Sustrans initiated 10 SRTS projects Bike lanes, traffic calming, raised crossings After 2 years, bicycle use tripled Child cycling injuries fell by 28% Child pedestrian crashes fell 70%
  4. 4. North America Canada  Go for Green (Toronto)  Way to Go (British Columbia) The Bronx California Florida
  5. 5. History of Safe Routes to School Marin County, California     Walk or Wheel Wednesdays Frequent Rider contests Walking School Buses Huge increase in  Number of children walking to school  Number of children biking to School  Number of carpools
  6. 6. Why We’re Doing This Work Source: J. Pucher and R. Buehler, City Cycling (2012)
  7. 7. Children’s Health Risks Related to Inactivity, Air Quality, and Traffic Safety  The prevalence of overweight children has tripled in the United States.  There has been a sharp increase in cases of type 2 diabetes in children.  Asthma rates in children have increased 160% in the past 15 years.  Pedestrian injuries are the 3rd leading cause of unintentional injury-related death among children in the U.S.
  8. 8. Incomplete School Zones The Philadelphia Daily News
  9. 9. Incomplete School Zones
  10. 10. Incomplete School Routes
  11. 11. Incomplete School Routes Irvington Newark
  12. 12. Incomplete School Routes Trenton Camden
  13. 13. Incomplete School Sites
  14. 14. Travel to school can be up to 25% of morning traffic (Parisi Associates, 2003)
  15. 15. Fewer kids are biking and walking. More parents are driving. 2001: 15% walked to school 1969: 48% walked to school (EPA, 2003)
  16. 16. Far more children are driven to school than walk or bicycle (school trips of 1 mile or less) 3% 1% Auto School Bus 31% 51% Walk Bicycle Other 14% Calculations from the1995 Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey. US Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, unpublished data, 2000.
  17. 17. Safe Routes to School programs are intended to … … increase physical activity … improve unsafe walking and biking conditions … improve poor air quality by reducing vehicle emissions
  18. 18. Main Goals of the Safe Routes to School Program 1. Where it’s safe, get kids walking and biking. 2. WHERE IT’S NOT SAFE, MAKE IT SAFE. Trenton Maplewood
  19. 19. 2005 U.S. Transportation Bill First Federal SRTS Program $612 Million divided among states based  upon student enrollment  $15 Million to New Jersey (2005 to 2009)  100% Federally Funded  Eligible use of funds:  Infrastructure related projects  Non-Infrastructure projects
  20. 20. Federal SRTS Funding for NJ  FY 2005 $1 million Brick Twp  FY 2006 $2.4 million  FY 2007 $3.3 million  FY 2008 $4.1 million  FY 2009 $5.1 million  FY 2010 $5.1 million  FY 2011 $5.6 million  FY 2012 $4.7 million TOTAL $31.3 million Brick Township
  21. 21. 4 Rounds of SRTS Grants in NJ  129 grants  $19.26 million  projects in 98 towns  200+ schools  in all 21 counties  $3 million in statewide programs
  22. 22. Engineering projects  Create safer conditions for walking and bicycling  Can influence the way people behave Westfield Lambertville Elmer
  23. 23. 2012 NJ SRTS Infrastructure Grants Projects include installation of: ADA compliant sidewalks, bike paths, striping, signage, lighting, signals, traffic calming improvements, etc. Example Project Highlights: Egg Harbor City Sidewalk and bikeway to connect ped bridge to school Bergenfield Extension of Bergenfield Bikeway System Boonton Lighted crosswalks, flashing crosswalk signs Chatham Borough Permanent radar display, speed tables
  24. 24. 2014 SRTS Infrastructure Grants NJDOT wants to see:  Partnerships/Agreements  Comprehensive approach  School Travel Plans Extra points for:  Urban Aid Communities  Good record on past grants  Complete Streets Policy  Demonstrated commitment Haddonfield
  25. 25. Enforcement programs  Increase awareness of pedestrians and bicyclists  Improve driver behavior  Help children follow traffic rules
  26. 26. Educational programs     Impart safety skills Create safety awareness Foster life-long safety habits Include parents, neighbors and other drivers Camden Pemberton
  27. 27. Encouragement programs  Increase popularity of walking and bicycling  Are an easy way to start SRTS programs  Emphasize fun and community New Brunswick
  28. 28. International Walk to School Day Maplewood Montclair Chesterfield Garfield
  29. 29. National Bike to School Day Montclair Wharton Medford Lakes Fairhaven
  30. 30. Walking School Bus Programs Van Derveer Elementary School Somerville, NJ RIDEWISE TMA  Researched the safest walking routes  5 route maps with timelines  Groups led by adults  Kick-off events
  31. 31. New Jersey SRTS Resource Center VTC supports NJDOT through research, training and outreach to maximize the effectiveness of the New Jersey Safe Routes to School program.
  32. 32. Safe Routes to School Research  Supportive Walk and Bike to School Policies  Can I Bicycle to School? A Review of School Bicycling Policies in Middlesex Co.  SRTS & School Busing Cuts  Crossing Guard Training Needs in New Jersey  The Effects of Parental Attitudes on School Travel
  33. 33. Crossing Guard Program  Focus Group Research  Model Municipal Policy  Training Manual  Pilot Training
  34. 34. 2011 - Expanded Resource Center A partnership with NJ’s Transportation Management Associations to provide outreach, program and technical assistance to local communities.
  35. 35. NJ’s TMAs  8 Regional SRTS Coordinators  Direct technical assistance to communities  Assistance with SRTS programs and events  Assistance with monitoring and evaluation  Assistance with grant funding applications  Assistance with School Travel or SRTS Action Plans
  36. 36. Statewide TMA School Outreach 2011 96 schools 2012 354 schools
  37. 37. Regional Coordinator Outreach In 2012, TMAs contacted:  237 municipalities  76 disadvantaged communities  354 schools TMAs conducted:  240 bicycle and pedestrian events  167 safety education events Jersey City, NJ
  38. 38. Regional Coordinator Outreach Most Popular Forms of Assistance:  Walk to School days  Walking school buses  Educational safety presentations/assemblies  Encouragement programs – “Golden Sneaker Awards”  Bike Rodeos Pemberton, NJ  School Travel Plans
  39. 39. School Travel Plans/Action Plans         Existing conditions Existing attitudes Problem areas Potential solutions Involved parties Schedule Funding options Maps, photos
  40. 40. October Walk & Bike to School Month New Jersey Registered Walk & Bike to School Events 2003-2012 140 134 120 Netcong, NJ 100 80 78 60 67 67 57 40 20 83 11 35 39 47 0 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
  41. 41. NJ SRTS Recognition Program 58 Total SRTS Recognition Program Winners for May 2013 13 Gold Level Winners 21 Silver Level Winners 9 Bronze Level Winners 15 First Step Level Winners
  42. 42. NJ SRTS Resource Center website
  43. 43. SRTS and Complete Streets Safe Routes to School Programs are a good way to prioritize your Complete Streets efforts. Jamesburg
  44. 44. Safer routes to school are safer routes for everyone. Elise Bremer-Nei, AICP/PP Safe Routes to School Coordinator NJ Department of Transportation elise.bremer-nei@dot.state.nj.us Leigh Ann Von Hagen, AICP/PP Senior Research Specialist NJ SRTS Resource Center Voorhees Transportation Center lavh@ejb.rutgers.edu Sean Meehan, smeehan@ejb.rutgers.edu Trish Sanchez, trish.sanchez@ejb.rutgers.edu Catherine Bull, catherin.bull@ejb.rutgers.edu

×