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Why People Check Their Tech at the Wrong Times (and the Simple Trick to Stop It)

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Chances are you've witnessed and even took active part in a lot of indiscriminate gadget use.

But staying silent about bad technology habits is making things worse for all of us.

We need to develop social antibodies, defenses against new harmful behaviors, or else we'll end up serving technology instead of it serving us.

If we don’t build social antibodies, the disease of distraction will become the new normal.

To do this, we need to find out who's to blame for our distraction and what we need to do about it.

Read the whole blog post at: http://www.nirandfar.com/2016/03/why-people-check-their-phones-at-the-wrong-times.html

Published in: Technology

Why People Check Their Tech at the Wrong Times (and the Simple Trick to Stop It)

  1. 1. @nireyalNirAndFar.com (and the Simple Tricks to STOP IT) Why People Check Their Tech at the Wrong Times
  2. 2. “We expect more from technology and less from each other.” - Sherry Turkle Director of the MIT Initiative on Technology and Self vs
  3. 3. Chances are you’ve experienced the following:
  4. 4. You’re with a small group of friends at a nice restaurant.
  5. 5. Everyone is enjoying the food and conversation.
  6. 6. Then someone decides to take out her phone…
  7. 7. Not for an urgent call…
  8. 8. Not for an urgent call… but to check email, Twitter, and Facebook.
  9. 9. The Disease that is Indiscriminate Gadget Use
  10. 10. Doing nothing in the face of indiscriminate gadget use is no longer O.K.
  11. 11. Staying silent about bad technology habits is making things worse for all of us.
  12. 12. Paul Graham coined the term “Social Antibodies”: defenses against new harmful behaviors
  13. 13. He uses the example of cigarette smoking.
  14. 14. Smoking in public became taboo over the span of just one generation after social conventions changed.
  15. 15. The remedy to screen indiscretion may be developing new norms that make it socially undesirable to check one’s phone in the company of others.
  16. 16. Keep in mind: Tech makers design these products using the same psychology that makes slot machines addictive.
  17. 17. If we don’t build social antibodies, the disease of distraction will become the new normal.
  18. 18. But how do we develop and spread social antibodies to inoculate ourselves against bad mobile manners?
  19. 19. At Work: Mandate a “no-screen meeting”
  20. 20. At corporate meetings, someone (typically the highest- paid person in the room) starts using his or her personal technology.
  21. 21. This sends a message to everyone in the room that gadget time is more important than their time.
  22. 22. This also prevents the person using the device from participating in the discussion, which means the meeting wasn’t worth having in the first place.
  23. 23. Workshops and discussions declared device-free are by far more productive.
  24. 24. Setting expectations up front is equivalent to administering a distraction vaccine.
  25. 25. Among Friends: Snap the offender out of the phone zone
  26. 26. Give your friend two options:
  27. 27. excuse himself to attend to whatever crisis is happening Give your friend two options:
  28. 28. excuse himself to attend to whatever crisis is happening Give your friend two options: put away the tech and go back to the conversation or
  29. 29. How? Ask a question: Pull him back to the conversation while sending a clear message.
  30. 30. Then say, “Oh, sorry, were you on your phone? Is everything O.K.?”
  31. 31. More often than not, your friend will tuck his phone back into his pocket and start enjoying the company.
  32. 32. Let’s Do Something
  33. 33. Set limits. Don’t resign yourself to being ignored.
  34. 34. The idea is not to disavow technology completely, but to encourage people to appreciate its power, and to be aware when its power over them is becoming a problem.
  35. 35. Technology should serve us — we should not serve it.
  36. 36. Subscribe and receive the OFFICIAL WORKBOOK for Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products.
  37. 37. Subscribe and receive the OFFICIAL WORKBOOK for Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products. Click to SUBSCRIBE!

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