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Enterprise Habit-Forming Products

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Examples of the Hook Model in enterprise applications. See Nir Eyal's book "Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products" for more, see: NirAndFar.com/GetHooked
Blogging at: NirAndFar.com
Twitter: @nireyal

Published in: Business

Enterprise Habit-Forming Products

  1. 1. h kBuildingHabitsintheEnterprise
 
@nireyal
  2. 2. …  more  at:   NirAndFar.com
  3. 3. PA TT E SN R
  4. 4. A  BEHAVIOR  DONE  WITH CONSCIOUS   THOUGHT LITTLE  OR  NO  
 hab·it
  5. 5. h kThe$HOOK$is$an$experience$designed$to$ connect$the$user’s$problem$to$your$solu7on.$
  6. 6. h k with%enough%% FREQUENCY%% to%% FORM+A+HABIT.+
  7. 7. h kA"Hook"has"4"parts:"
  8. 8. h k
  9. 9. EXTERNAL  TRIGGERS
 The  information  for  what  to  do  next     is  within  the  trigger. Billboards SO DA
  10. 10. INTERNAL  TRIGGERS
 The  information  for  what  to  do  next  is  informed  
 through  an  association  in  the  user’s  memory.
  11. 11. Negative  emotions  are  POWERFUL  INTERNAL  TRIGGERS. lost indecisive tense fatiguedinferior bored confused fear  of  loss dissatisfied powerless discouraged lonesome
  12. 12. People  who  are  DEPRESSED  CHECK  EMAIL  MORE  OFTEN.    Source:  Kotikalapudi  et  al  2012
  13. 13. When  we  feel  LONELY  we  use
  14. 14. When  we  feel  UNSURE  we    use                                                
  15. 15. When  we  are  BORED  we  use                                      
  16. 16. At  work  …   when  we  feel  ANXIOUS  we  use                                          EMAIL                                
  17. 17. At  work  …   when  we  feel  INDECISIVE  we  use                                          EMAIL                                
  18. 18. At  work  …   when  we  feel  STRESS  we  use                                          EMAIL                                
  19. 19. Maybe email is making us depressed?
  20. 20. This  is  the   opportunity! Uncertainty Stress Lonely Curious FoMO Bored
  21. 21. What  triggers  make                                                  so  habit-­‐forming?
  22. 22.  external  triggers
  23. 23. pain  of  workplace  FoMO. solves  the
  24. 24. BLOCKING  OUT OTHER  DISTRACTIONS
  25. 25. h k
  26. 26. The SIMPLEST  BEHAVIOR in  anticipation  of  a  reward.
  27. 27. Scroll
  28. 28. Play
  29. 29. According  to  BJ  Fogg,  for  any  behavior  to  occur,  we   need  MOTIVATION,  ABILITY,  and  a  TRIGGER b=m+a+t
  30. 30. Fogg  Behavior  Model MOTIVATION ABILITY Level  of  motivation  and  ability   determines  if  action  will  occur. Source:  Dr.  BJ  Fogg,  Stanford  University TRIGGER   SUCCEEDS TRIGGER   FAILS
  31. 31. Time% $ Six$factors$can$increase$or$decrease$ability. % Money% Physical%effort% Brain%cycles% Social%deviance% Non8rou:ne% Source:%Dr.%BJ%Fogg,%Stanford%University%
  32. 32. Source:  Mobile  Iron,  Inc. Access  increases  ability  at
  33. 33. Source:  Mobile  Iron,  Inc. Access  increases  ability  at
  34. 34. h k
  35. 35.  UNCERTAINTY CONTROLING  
  36. 36. IS  FASCINATING. THE  UNKNOWN Variability  causes  us  to     focus  and  engage
  37. 37. …and  increases  behavior.
  38. 38. 3  types  of  VARIABLE  REWARDS TRIBE HUNT SELF Habit-­‐forming  tech  uses  1  OR  MORE
  39. 39. TRIBE SEARCH  FOR SOCIAL  REWARDS
  40. 40. partnershipempatheticjoy competition
  41. 41. We  Like  social  rewards.
  42. 42. We  value  recognition  from  our  tribe
  43. 43. HUNT SEARCH  FOR RESOURCES
  44. 44. Stems  from  the  hunt  for  food  and  resources
  45. 45. Hunt  for  variable  material  rewards
  46. 46. Hunt  
 for  variable   information  
 rewards.
  47. 47. Hunt  for  variable  information  
 rewards  at
  48. 48. SELF SELF-­‐ACHIEVEMENT SEARCH  FOR
  49. 49. Leveling-­‐up  reflects  MASTERY  and  COMPETENCY.
  50. 50. Inbox  or  task  management  reflects  
 CONSISTENCY  and  COMPLETION.
  51. 51. The  logical  extreme  in
  52. 52. WARNING Variable  rewards  are  not  a  free  pass.  
 Your  product  still  must  address  the  itch.
  53. 53. Build  variable  rewards  that  scratch  the  users  itch,   but  leave  them  wanting  more.
  54. 54. h k
  55. 55. Users  “invest”  for  future  benefits. Social Capital Money Time Effort Emotional CommitmentPersonal Data
  56. 56. Investments increase the likelihood of the next pass through the Hook in 
 TWO
 ways.
  57. 57. 1.INVESTMENTS   LOAD  THE   NEXT  TRIGGER                OF  THE  HOOK.
  58. 58. Each  new  message  posted  on
  59. 59. …  loads  the  next   external  trigger.
  60. 60. INVESTMENTS  STORE  VALUE,  
 improving  the  product  with  use.2.
  61. 61. CONTENT
  62. 62. DATA
  63. 63. FOLLOWERS
  64. 64. REPUTATION
  65. 65. h kThe$HOOK$is$an$experience$designed$to$ connect$the$user’s$problem$to$your$solu7on.$
  66. 66. Harnessing   VERY  GOOD HABITS   can  be   FOR  BUSINESS.
  67. 67. The  HOOK 1.  What  internal  trigger  is               the  product  addressing?   2.  What  external  trigger                 gets  the  user  to  the  product? 4.  Is  the  reward   fulfilling,  yet  leaves  the   user  wanting  more? 3.  What  is  the  simplest   behavior  in  anticipation   of  reward? 5.  What  “bit  of  work”  is  done   to  increase  the  likelihood  of   returning?
  68. 68. Enterprise  software  has
 SUCKED  FOR  TOO  LONG.
  69. 69. Users  want  to  be  in  control. AUTONOMY   FEELS  GOOD. Source:    Deci  and  Ryan  on  Self-­‐Determination  Theory
  70. 70. Habit-­‐forming  enterprise  products  can
 GROW  FROM  THE BOTTOM-­‐UP.
  71. 71. Understanding  not  only  what  users  THINK,   but  also  what  makes  them  TICK.
  72. 72. h k It’s  time  to  build   HABITS  FOR  GOOD   @nireyal   www.NirAndFar.com Take  the  survey.  Get  the  slides.   www.OpinionTo.Us  

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