PROMPT <ul><li>Policy Roundtable Mobilizing Professions and Trades  </li></ul><ul><li>A REVIEW OF BRIDGE TRAINING PROGRAMS...
Introduction <ul><li>PROMPT’s work to date (2002-2006) </li></ul><ul><li>Why look at bridge training? Funding: $43 million...
The Approach  <ul><li>Compilation of first publicly available inventory of bridge training programs in Ontario </li></ul><...
Equity Framework <ul><li>Developed by PROMPT: </li></ul><ul><li>Accountability through transparency and outcomes  </li></u...
Historical Context of Bridge Training for IPBs <ul><li>The assumption of deficiency of credentials (academic and experienc...
Programs: Overview In compiling the inventory, we located 60 publicly announce initiatives on bridge training. However, wh...
Programs: Overview Sector based programs are more general in nature e.g. REACH and Career Bridge. These programs focused p...
Programs: Components 50 to 80% of bridge training  programs cover components related to assessing language proficiency, pr...
Programs: The Process <ul><li>Typically takes 6 to 24 months to complete: </li></ul><ul><li>Pre-screening </li></ul><ul><l...
Programs: Process Issues Faced by IPBs <ul><li>Entry Requirement </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of access to work placement </li><...
Programs: Barriers Faced by IPBs Barriers Identified/ Faced by IPB respondents Respondents by Profession NURS SW PHY  TEAC...
Programs: Qualitative Findings PHY TEACH TECH DOC What has been found useful in the Bridge Training Program (from most to ...
Programs: Qualitative Findings <ul><li>The following are gaps that respondents hoped bridge training programs would have i...
Critical Gaps and Challenges <ul><li>Lack of programming that ensures positive, skills commensurate employment outcomes fo...
Quotes <ul><li>I think my education and experience are quite adequate…I have an idea - after passing the credentials revie...
Policies: Overview <ul><li>“ The Government of Canada alone cannot integrate internationally trained workers into the Cana...
Policies: Findings <ul><li>Policy initiatives all support the assumption of deficiency of credentials (academic and work e...
Equity Issues <ul><li>Current policies and programs were lacking when compared to our equity framework. </li></ul><ul><li>...
Equity Issues <ul><li>Negotiation and Administration of Collaborative Multi-stakeholder Approaches </li></ul><ul><li>Curre...
Stated Outcomes vs. Realities <ul><li>The review suggests that there are disconnects between different stakeholders’ inten...
In a nut shell… <ul><li>We need to evolve and rework concept of bridging around equity. </li></ul><ul><li>Both policies an...
Key Equity Based Recommendations <ul><li>Re-conceptualization and re-working of “bridging” -  knowledge transfer. Resource...
Key Equity Based Recommendations <ul><li>A seamless information and support system must be developed that IPBs, and others...
Contact <ul><li>Nikhat Rasheed </li></ul><ul><li>PROMPT Coordinator </li></ul><ul><li>(416) 979 -8611 ext. 4310 </li></ul>...
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2006 Overview Of Bridging Programs In Ontario (First Ever Review)

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2006 Overview Of Bridging Programs In Ontario (First Ever Review)

  1. 1. PROMPT <ul><li>Policy Roundtable Mobilizing Professions and Trades </li></ul><ul><li>A REVIEW OF BRIDGE TRAINING PROGRAMS FOR IMMIGRANTS WITH PROFESSIONAL BACKGROUNDS IN ONTARIO </li></ul><ul><li>EXPLORATORY FINDINGS </li></ul><ul><li>Presented by: Nikhat Rasheed and Rajgopal Chakrawarti </li></ul><ul><li>Metro Hall </li></ul><ul><li>Toronto – June 28, 2006 </li></ul>
  2. 2. Introduction <ul><li>PROMPT’s work to date (2002-2006) </li></ul><ul><li>Why look at bridge training? Funding: $43 million and growing… </li></ul><ul><li>Exploratory research based on inductive approach – initial lay of the land </li></ul><ul><li>Two pronged paper: examine policy processes and individual bridge training programs to identify whether or not these programs aid integration of IPBs into the labour market </li></ul><ul><li>Key component to look at the historical context and evolution of these initiatives, so that we can understand not only current issues within these initiatives but also understand the underlying assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>To evolve broad recommendations from an equity perspective </li></ul>
  3. 3. The Approach <ul><li>Compilation of first publicly available inventory of bridge training programs in Ontario </li></ul><ul><li>Multi-layered approach to data collection and analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Data analysis examined through stakeholders: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Needs and Expectations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Stated and Delivered Outcomes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assumptions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Perspectives </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Stakeholders included government (funding bodies), program providers (educational institutions, immigrant agencies, regulatory bodies), employers and most importantly, IPBs themselves. </li></ul><ul><li>Methodology: Combination of secondary source review and primary data collection (focus groups, individual and key informant interviews) </li></ul>
  4. 4. Equity Framework <ul><li>Developed by PROMPT: </li></ul><ul><li>Accountability through transparency and outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>Unbiased acknowledgement of differences and diversity and creation of unique opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Equitable opportunities, benefits and outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>Equitable distribution of human capital and resources </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiation and administration of collaborative multi-stakeholder approaches </li></ul><ul><li>Provision of good quality, relevant and timely information and support </li></ul>
  5. 5. Historical Context of Bridge Training for IPBs <ul><li>The assumption of deficiency of credentials (academic and experience) of IPBs is rooted in history and emanates from the disconnect between the Federal Government’s policy focus on sustainable development, and Ontario’s assumption that it already has a world-class workforce that will aid it in being globally competitive. </li></ul><ul><li>The Government of Canada and “Sustainable Development” </li></ul><ul><li>Ontario and “Strong people, Strong Economy” </li></ul><ul><li>The Knowledge Economy </li></ul><ul><li>Foreign Credential Recognition in Ontario </li></ul><ul><li>Human Resources Management – A Quick History </li></ul><ul><li>Newcomer Support and Bridging – 1974 to 2000 </li></ul><ul><li>Newcomer Support and Bridging – 2001 to 2006 </li></ul>
  6. 6. Programs: Overview In compiling the inventory, we located 60 publicly announce initiatives on bridge training. However, while trying to do the analysis we were able to trace only 56 in total including 40 specific to professions (for IPBs) and 16 that were sector based. The charts show analysis of programs based on the 40 profession-specific bridge training programs. Health and teaching professions had the most programs dedicated to them (total of 62%) 47% of programs are in the regulated professions, while 25% of programs are in the non-regulated professions.
  7. 7. Programs: Overview Sector based programs are more general in nature e.g. REACH and Career Bridge. These programs focused primary on job skills (56%) (job search, resume writing, mock interviews, internship and mentorship) and language training (38%) Educational institutions ranked as the main lead providers of bridge training programs (47%), often in partnership with community agencies (20%). Occasionally, regulatory bodies were also involved in providing bridge training either as lead or support providers.
  8. 8. Programs: Components 50 to 80% of bridge training programs cover components related to assessing language proficiency, prior learning assessment (PLA) and credentials equivalency 69% provide an occupation specific course or competency development that might include work placement, practicum, and/or mentoring as a part of the course 19% cover mentoring and work placement explicitly 50% of programs cover occupation specific terminology 38% variably cover other supports such as job (employer) referral options, job counselling, mock interviews, résumé writing, networking, access to job postings Lang/ PLA: language/ prior learning assessment OST: Occupation specific terminology Other: Including job referral options, counselling, mock interviews, resume writing, networking and access to job postings Cumulative totals exceeds 100 as there are multiple components across different types of programs
  9. 9. Programs: The Process <ul><li>Typically takes 6 to 24 months to complete: </li></ul><ul><li>Pre-screening </li></ul><ul><li>Information Session </li></ul><ul><li>Pre-Assessment Interview </li></ul><ul><li>Participation in Program Components and Case Management </li></ul><ul><li>Registration Exam </li></ul><ul><li>Networking, Information and Counselling </li></ul>
  10. 10. Programs: Process Issues Faced by IPBs <ul><li>Entry Requirement </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of access to work placement </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of access to employers and their indifferent attitude </li></ul><ul><li>Financial Issues </li></ul><ul><li>Course duration </li></ul><ul><li>Access to information </li></ul><ul><li>Licensing and accreditation requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluative mechanisms (including feedback loops) </li></ul><ul><li>Following slides utilize information received from respondents who had participated in bridge training programs </li></ul>
  11. 11. Programs: Barriers Faced by IPBs Barriers Identified/ Faced by IPB respondents Respondents by Profession NURS SW PHY TEACH TECH DOC 1. Entry requirements             2. Lack or inadequate work placement /internship/ mentoring opportunity             3. Lack of access to Employers             4. Employer’s Indifferent attitude             5. Cost Factor (beyond affordability)             6. Duration of the Course/program (longer)             7. Access to Information             8. Licensing & Accreditation requirement            
  12. 12. Programs: Qualitative Findings PHY TEACH TECH DOC What has been found useful in the Bridge Training Program (from most to least) Respondents by profession NUR SW 1. Orientation/exposure, work placement/ internship/co-op/practicum/mentoring             2. Occupation Specific Credit course/ program             3. Networking to get access to job posting and other information and facilities             4. Information & Counselling             5. Language/Competence upgrading opportunities             6. Sector/occupation specific terminology             7. Assistance in Licensing & Accreditation             8. Other (financial assistance, referrals, one-to-one counselling, job posting etc.)            
  13. 13. Programs: Qualitative Findings <ul><li>The following are gaps that respondents hoped bridge training programs would have incorporated: </li></ul><ul><li>Paid work placement, internship, mentorship etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Credit course (not longer than six months; preferably a three month internship or work placement) </li></ul><ul><li>Minimal fees and/or 100% coverage of financial cost through financial assistance </li></ul><ul><li>Need based and customized packages for individual IPBs (based on factors such as age group, educational level, length of experience and other competence) instead of same program for all IPBs within the same sector </li></ul><ul><li>Direct assistance to access to employers/employment for those who are job ready, and did not see a need for any assessment or upgrading </li></ul><ul><li>Customized programs for those who could not enter into a bridge training program despite several attempts </li></ul>
  14. 14. Critical Gaps and Challenges <ul><li>Lack of programming that ensures positive, skills commensurate employment outcomes for IPBs </li></ul><ul><li>Narrow Geographical Coverage and Geographic Dispersion </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of Continuity of Bridge Training Programs Due to a Lack of Sustainability Strategies and Funding Commitments </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of a comprehensive information system on labour market integration initiatives or opportunities for IPBs </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of a well-developed, sophisticated database that offers disaggregated information on employment and other outcomes for IPB participants </li></ul>
  15. 15. Quotes <ul><li>I think my education and experience are quite adequate…I have an idea - after passing the credentials review and written exam, one could get work placement for a maximum two months. Within that period there is inclusion of a modularized course (self-learning process) in understanding Canadian health system and information and orientation to physiotherapy professional practice in Ontario….BPI09 </li></ul><ul><li>The program didn’t yield my expected result and what have I lost? I would say, it’s beyond money and time. It is my dignity as a professional. That would mean I would be affected in so many aspect of my being. Just imagine the trouble that you will be getting into…… BPI05 </li></ul><ul><li>I was contemplating to attend a bridge training programs. But then, I am sceptical about how far it would help to know what I already know. I have seen that they know as much as I know or much less than what I know. So, then what’s the point of going through another course? I’d rather invest that time in finding myself in a job….NBPI15 </li></ul>
  16. 16. Policies: Overview <ul><li>“ The Government of Canada alone cannot integrate internationally trained workers into the Canadian labour market. Provincial and territorial governments are essential partners. We will also have to work closely with cities and communities, service providers, employers, labour, professional and regulatory bodies, post-secondary educational institutions, other stakeholders and ordinary Canadians.” </li></ul><ul><li>Policy findings mainly centred on reviewing government initiatives, budget documents and administrative processes around bridge training programs </li></ul>
  17. 17. Policies: Findings <ul><li>Policy initiatives all support the assumption of deficiency of credentials (academic and work experience) </li></ul><ul><li>Most initiatives are focused on educating IPBs as opposed to employers </li></ul><ul><li>Program providers also operate on the assumption of deficiency </li></ul><ul><li>Specific gap analysis of IPB knowledge, experience and skills seems not to have been researched within different professions, prior to the design of these bridge training programs. </li></ul><ul><li>Review threw up that employers are “risk averse” and lack familiarity and understanding of foreign education and work experience, and are unwilling to look beyond familiar business practices and hiring practices </li></ul>
  18. 18. Equity Issues <ul><li>Current policies and programs were lacking when compared to our equity framework. </li></ul><ul><li>Accountability through Transparency and Outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>Limited evidence of accountability in evaluation mechanisms establishing positive employment outcomes for IPBs were limited. Program providers could not support their performance in terms of expected outcomes from the perspective of IPBs. </li></ul><ul><li>Unbiased Acknowledgement of Differences and Diversity and Creation of Unique Opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Bridge training programs currently do not acknowledge differences in the abilities of IPBs who bring knowledge and experience, as well in differences in the abilities, knowledge base and attitudes of other relevant players including employers, regulatory bodies and program providers to provide employment, licensure and relevant programming </li></ul><ul><li>Equitable Opportunities, Benefits and Outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>IPBs must be able to access relevant programs and be entitled to help with resource issues. </li></ul><ul><li>Equitable Distribution of Human Capital and Resources </li></ul><ul><li>Current bridge training programs have not been targeted as heavily at employers to either educate them on the needs and advantages of hiring IPBs or to familiarize and assist them in developing an understanding of academic qualifications and work experience acquired outside of Canada. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Equity Issues <ul><li>Negotiation and Administration of Collaborative Multi-stakeholder Approaches </li></ul><ul><li>Current framework not based on collaborative multi-stakeholder approach in designing, implementing and evaluating policy around bridge training. IPBs must be included as part of the design process along with others. </li></ul><ul><li>Provision of Good Quality, Relevant and Timely Information and Support </li></ul><ul><li>Program framework must include a range of supports (including information) for IPBs and other stakeholder groups. The programs are funded based on specific proposals received and not explicitly guided by the composition of the IPB population needing support </li></ul><ul><li>Program Framework Not Based On Capacity or Competency to Deliver Projected Outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>The review of bridge training programs available did not reveal any information regarding competency based analyses or evaluation of program providers. There is an assumption that program providers have the requisite capacity, competency and knowledge base to provide bridge training programs. </li></ul><ul><li>Return on Investment (ROI) </li></ul><ul><li>No data on expectations of return on investment or benefits derived could be located in public domain for the bridge training programs. Also no document could be located in public domain regarding cost – benefit analyses conducted on this, or other, funding allocations for bridge training programs. </li></ul>
  20. 20. Stated Outcomes vs. Realities <ul><li>The review suggests that there are disconnects between different stakeholders’ intentions, initiatives and program design. While stated outcomes are either to prepare IPBs for licensure (academic component) or to integrate them into the labour market quickly and effectively (work experience component), the impact of existing initiatives do not seem significant in terms of implementing or materializing these stated outcomes, particularly when examining the latter i.e. bridge to work. </li></ul>
  21. 21. In a nut shell… <ul><li>We need to evolve and rework concept of bridging around equity. </li></ul><ul><li>Both policies and program design, implementation and evaluation need to meet the equity lens test. </li></ul><ul><li>Detailed recommendations are contained in the paper. </li></ul>
  22. 22. Key Equity Based Recommendations <ul><li>Re-conceptualization and re-working of “bridging” - knowledge transfer. Resources must be devoted to bridging knowledge gaps on all sides especially employer and institutional bridging. </li></ul><ul><li>Institutions that fund, design, implement or evaluate bridge training programs must be able to demonstrate that the policies and program frameworks incorporate accountability mechanisms, are transparent and sophisticated data specific to each program is publicly accessible. </li></ul><ul><li>Employer engagement and commitment should be made mandatory as part of “bridge to work” programs, and regulatory body engagement and commitment should be made mandatory as part of “bridge to licence” programs. </li></ul>
  23. 23. Key Equity Based Recommendations <ul><li>A seamless information and support system must be developed that IPBs, and others, can access in order to acquire relevant, timely and accurate information. Perhaps the “Access Centre” can be this centralized place but consultative engagement of IPBs through professional associations is necessary to ensure the relevance of information provided. </li></ul><ul><li>Entry requirements for bridge training programs must be inclusive and competency based. Current entry requirements have been seen as barriers to entry by IPB participants. </li></ul><ul><li>Funding bodies and/or the lead providers should support the IPBs financially during transition period (while going through bridge training programs and other professional development programs) until their integration into the employment market. </li></ul>
  24. 24. Contact <ul><li>Nikhat Rasheed </li></ul><ul><li>PROMPT Coordinator </li></ul><ul><li>(416) 979 -8611 ext. 4310 </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Thank you! </li></ul>

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