Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Grammaticality, Acceptability,
Meaningfulness
Done by: Yunda Darajatul Ilmi
Moh. Tomar
A. Kusnadi
1
• An utterance is a complete unit of speech in
spoken language. Note that utterances do
not exist in written language, onl...
• Grammaticality is a feature by its own and
should not be identified by acceptability and so its
acceptability should not...
• Meaningfulness Sentences are
grammatically well-formed. However, they
are either meaningful or meaningless.
Utterances c...
• Many utterances are unacceptable for sociocultural reasons.
• The some utterance would questionably have
the same meanin...
The Meaningfulness of Sentences
• what is meant by the meaningfulness of sentences?
• Some examples on the different betwe...
• Sentences can be grammatically well-formed yet
meaningless.
• E.g.: Colorless green ideas sleep furiously.

7
"colourless green ideas sleep furiously“.
 The sentence does not make sense because things
logically cannot be colourless...
• Other sentences can be ungrammatical yet
meaningful.
• For example „I want that he come.‟
• The sentence make sense alth...
• "Make sense" is the rule of semantics.
• The essential point is that, although words
may be grammatically well-formed , ...
Conclusion
• Summing up this comparison between;
grammaticality, acceptability and meaningfulness, is
that 'utterances' ar...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Grammaticality, acceptability and meaningfullnes

12,698 views

Published on

  • You might get some help from ⇒ www.HelpWriting.net ⇐ Success and best regards!
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • You have to choose carefully. ⇒ www.WritePaper.info ⇐ offers a professional writing service. I highly recommend them. The papers are delivered on time and customers are their first priority. This is their website: ⇒ www.WritePaper.info ⇐
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Check the source ⇒ www.HelpWriting.net ⇐ This site is really helped me out gave me relief from headaches. Good luck!
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Dating for everyone is here: ❤❤❤ http://bit.ly/2ZDZFYj ❤❤❤
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Follow the link, new dating source: ♥♥♥ http://bit.ly/2ZDZFYj ♥♥♥
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Grammaticality, acceptability and meaningfullnes

  1. 1. Grammaticality, Acceptability, Meaningfulness Done by: Yunda Darajatul Ilmi Moh. Tomar A. Kusnadi 1
  2. 2. • An utterance is a complete unit of speech in spoken language. Note that utterances do not exist in written language, only their representations do. • Some utterances are both grammatical and meaningful; others are ungrammatical and meaningless ; and yet others, though fully grammatical and perhaps also meaningful are unacceptable 2
  3. 3. • Grammaticality is a feature by its own and should not be identified by acceptability and so its acceptability should not be identified by its meaningfulness. • Acceptability , a sentence is accepted in a particular community and in particular culture. E.g. It is rude to address a social superior by second pronoun “ you”. 3
  4. 4. • Meaningfulness Sentences are grammatically well-formed. However, they are either meaningful or meaningless. Utterances can be ungrammatical , yet , they are meaningful 4
  5. 5. • Many utterances are unacceptable for sociocultural reasons. • The some utterance would questionably have the same meaning in another language that would be acceptable in some contexts but not in others. • There is another type of acceptability which have to do with rationality and logical coherence. 5
  6. 6. The Meaningfulness of Sentences • what is meant by the meaningfulness of sentences? • Some examples on the different between sentences grammatically right and has no meaning (meaningless) and vice versa . • Example : I want that he came. I want him to come. 6
  7. 7. • Sentences can be grammatically well-formed yet meaningless. • E.g.: Colorless green ideas sleep furiously. 7
  8. 8. "colourless green ideas sleep furiously“.  The sentence does not make sense because things logically cannot be colourless and green simultaneously, ideas cannot sleep and nothing can sleep furiously.  It is grammatically correct but semantically illformed (meaningless). 8
  9. 9. • Other sentences can be ungrammatical yet meaningful. • For example „I want that he come.‟ • The sentence make sense although it is grammatically wrong. It has the same meaning as: "I want him to come". • The structure of sentences and their meaning are two distinct things. 9
  10. 10. • "Make sense" is the rule of semantics. • The essential point is that, although words may be grammatically well-formed , they cannot form a meaningful sentence, or be a part of a meaningful phrase. 10
  11. 11. Conclusion • Summing up this comparison between; grammaticality, acceptability and meaningfulness, is that 'utterances' are not usually understood, they sometimes differs in grammar and meaning, as in some utterances might be 'ungrammatical' but at the same time 'meaningful', and sometimes it might be 'ungrammatical' and 'meaningless'. • As for acceptability, it means a sentence being accepted in a particular way (situation) or community and culture, it sometimes got something to do with 'Logic'. 11

×