Contemporary modes of transnational education

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This presentation reviews the changing forms of transnational partnerships between universities and offshore partners, developing an alternative framework within which to analyse transnational education.

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Contemporary modes of transnational education

  1. 1. Contemporary Modes of Transnational Education Internationalisation of the Curriculum and Transnational Education Research and Practice Networks Conference, 6 February 2014 Nigel Healey, Nottingham Trent University Lucy Michael, University of Hull
  2. 2. Introduction • What are the main ‘types’ of TNE? (revisited) • Limits of existing typologies • A new typology 06 February 2014 2
  3. 3. Types of TNE (1): by activity (4F: QAA/HESA) 1. Distance-learning 2. International branch campus 3. Overseas partner institution a) Franchise b) Validation 06 February 2014 3
  4. 4. HESA Aggregate Offshore Return 2011/12 Overseas campus 15,150 Distance, flexible and distributed learning Other students registered at HEI Overseas partner organisation Most franchised and some validations buried here Other students studying overseas for HEI's award Total 06 February 2014 116,535 96,075 342,910 340 571,010 4
  5. 5. Types of TNE (2): by mode of delivery (GATS) GATS terminology Transnational education variant Mode 1 — Cross border supply Mode 2 — Consumption abroad Mode 3 — Commercial presence Programme mobility: distance or online education (4F type 1) Student mobility: export education Mode 4 — Presence of natural persons 06 February 2014 Institutional mobility:  International branch campus (4F type 2)  franchise (4F type 3a)  validated partner (4F type 3b) Staff mobility: fly-in/fly-out programmes 5
  6. 6. Background to critique of existing typologies, development of a new typology (Appendix A) • Analysis of 30 TNE case studies gathered from around the world through linkedin.com – Rich, but too brief and unrepresentative • Analysis of 40 QAA reports of TNE partnerships: – China (2012) – Singapore (2011) – Malaysia (2010) – India (2009) – The sample is selected to be representative and first three are the three largest TNE markets and India is the market with the most potential 06 February 2014 6
  7. 7. Limits of existing typologies …and some TNE partnerships off the radar 06 February 2014 7
  8. 8. A new typology • Spectrum 1: Regional hubs vs stand-alone outposts – What is the target market? – Is the partnership to absorb local demand? Or to attract international students? • Spectrum 2: Subject specialism vs multidisciplinary partnerships – How broad is the partnership? – A single degree (eg, flying faculty MBA)? Or a comprehensive range of degrees? • Spectrum 3: Research-led vs teaching-led partnerships – Is the partnership primarily about teaching? (could be commercially oriented or about capacity building) – Or is it to enhance research? (eg, by recruiting PGR students and accessing researchers and grants in the cost country) 06 February 2014 8
  9. 9. Conclusions • TNE partnerships are becoming increasingly complex, multidimensional and innovative • Existing typologies are increasingly unable to keep up with developments (microcosm of challenges of globalisation generally – eg, for tax law, environmental control) • New typology focuses on: – Target market – Breadth of partnership – Role of research nigel.healey@ntu.ac.uk l.michael@hull.ac.uk 06 February 2014 9

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