Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Analysis of Source 1<br />In the article, “An Elder offers advice”, Mary Anulik Kutsiq portrays the past and present lives...
INDIVIDUALISM/COLLECTIVISM
INDIVIDUALISM/COLLECTIVISM
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

INDIVIDUALISM/COLLECTIVISM

2,389 views

Published on

Published in: Economy & Finance, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

INDIVIDUALISM/COLLECTIVISM

  1. 1. Analysis of Source 1<br />In the article, “An Elder offers advice”, Mary Anulik Kutsiq portrays the past and present lives of the Inuit people related to collectivism and individualism. It is understood that in the past, the Inuit community lived collectively by sharing food, even when there was not a lot to begin with, cutting meat and bread evenly to distribute to the whole community, as well as brewing tea in a large community pot in order for each person to have a cup. The Inuit’s collectivist actions demonstrate that they follow principals of collective interest, collective responsibility, economic equality, collective norms, cooperation, and the common good of their community. These ideologies develop the Author’s belief of the importance of cooperation, and working together for the common good. <br />The Inuit’s expression of collectivism in their community can be compared to the ideology of modern liberalism and the concept of a welfare state. A welfare state follows a capitalist economy and uses policies that ensure economic stability and a basic standard of living for its citizens. This concept is followed by the Inuit community, because despite any circumstances, they always insure that the community as a whole has enough food to survive, allowing each individual to have a sense of security.<br />As a comparison, the Inuit population grows and the people become separated. Their community turns into an individualist community and follows an “every man for themselves” concept. This can be related to the ideology of Classical liberalism, and self interest. The author states that people in the community are becoming self centered and too involved with their own problems to help others, demonstrating the new individualist and self interest approach taken by the Inuit.<br />Analysis of Source 2<br />The cartoon which displays a working class man talking to a beggar who states, “In my day, bears worked for their honey”, demonstrates that in the past, a more individualist approach was made. The cartoon still portrays the concept of individualism presently by displaying economic freedom, through the diversity of the working class and the beggar, as well as supports the ideology of classical liberalism, including self interest and competition. However, a collectivist approach is made through modern liberalism by welfare state, the concept of supplying a basic standard of living and economic stability. This ideology is demonstrated by the beggar, because although he may not be working, he is still supported by the collective community through donations and programs for the poor. <br />Comparison of the Two Sources<br />As a comparison, the two sources include principals related to individualism and collectivism, as well as including welfare state, self interest, competition, and the common good. The difference between the two sources is that the first source included ideas of Collective responsibility, economic equality, collective interest and cooperation, where as the second source included ideas of economic freedom. <br />

×