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Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Competencies for Security and the Lodging Industry 
1. Explain important iss...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Elements of a Security Program 
• Doors, locks, key control, and access cont...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Doors, Locks, Key Control, and Access Control 
• Hotels must exercise good a...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Doors, Locks, Key Control, 
and Access Control 
• A guestroom door also may ...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Guestroom Security 
• In addition to guestroom keys and their control, there...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Control of Persons on Premises 
• Controlling people on the premises is one ...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Perimeter and Grounds Control 
• Surveillance systems provide security monit...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Protection of Assets 
• Hotel safe deposit boxes and in-room safes can be us...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Protection of Assets Continued from previous slide… 
• Bank audits, done on ...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Emergency Procedures 
• The hotel should have well-documented procedures for...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Emergency Procedures Continued from previous slide… 
• If a hotel is located...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Communications 
• Good communication forms the backbone of any successful 
s...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Communications Continued from previous slide… 
• Employees should be given s...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Security Records 
• Any activity that has a security-related dimension shoul...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Staff Security Procedures 
• Front desk employees should never mention a gue...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Security Issues with Payment Cards 
• Hotels must be extremely careful to ke...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Identity Theft 
• Dumpster diving 
• Skimming 
• Change of address 
Managing...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Effective Ways to Secure Payment Card Numbers 
• “Mask” card numbers on foli...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Management’s Role in Security 
• Managers should develop security guidelines...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Hotel Areas of Vulnerability 
• Hotels must be sensitive to their hospitalit...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Hotel Security Requirements 
• The number of lodging properties, the variety...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Setting Up a Hotel Security Program 
Setting up a hotel security program typ...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Relations with Local Governmental Agencies 
• It is important for hotel mana...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Relations with Local Governmental 
Agencies 
• Managers should invite approp...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Security Staffing 
• A hotel must decide whether to hire its own full-time s...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Security Staffing: Contract Security Companies 
• May be able to provide sop...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Security Staffing: 
Contract Security Companies 
• What hotels should look f...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Security Staffing: In-House Security Staff 
Advantages of using in-house sec...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Security Staffing: Off-Duty Police 
Pros 
• Superior training in reacting to...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Security Staffing: Off-Duty Police Continued from previous slide… 
Cons 
• T...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Security Training 
• Every hotel employee must be trained to identify securi...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Security Training Continued from previous slide… 
• Training should include ...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
The Authority of a Security Officer 
• Generally speaking, a hotel security ...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
The Authority of a Security Officer Continued from previous slide… 
• An arr...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
The Team Concept 
• The goal of a hotel’s security training program is to tu...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
The Team Concept Continued from previous slide… 
• All staff members should ...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Security and the Law 
• Every state has its own statutes and court rulings o...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Legal Concepts 
• Reasonable care 
• Foreseeability 
• Proximate cause 
• Ne...
Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry 
Legal Concepts Continued from previous slide… 
• Trial court 
Plaintiff 
Def...
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Chapter 7: Security & the Lodging Industry

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Managing Front Office Operations 9th Edition
Chapter 7 - Security & the Lodging Industry

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Chapter 7: Security & the Lodging Industry

  1. 1. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Competencies for Security and the Lodging Industry 1. Explain important issues in developing and managing a security program. 2. Describe the role that managers play in a property’s security program. 3. Explain the importance of setting up a security program, including security staffing and having a liaison with local law enforcement. 4. Identify the elements of security training that are critical to an effective security program. 5. List and describe the legal concepts and societal concerns related to security issues. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 1
  2. 2. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Elements of a Security Program • Doors, locks, key control, and access control • Guestroom security • Control of persons on premises • Perimeter and grounds control • Protection of assets • Emergency procedures • Communications • Security records • Staff security procedures Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 2
  3. 3. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Doors, Locks, Key Control, and Access Control • Hotels must exercise good access control to their premises in order to protect guests and employees. • Guestroom-access security is a top priority for hotels. • Most hotels now have electronic guestroom locks rather than mechanical locks; electronic systems can keep track of every entry and unauthorized entry attempt. • New guestroom key codes are issued each time a guest checks in, and guestroom keys typically are programmed to only work for the length of the guest’s stay. • For employees, guestroom keys are coded by department, and may also have time limits on them. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 3a Continued
  4. 4. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Doors, Locks, Key Control, and Access Control • A guestroom door also may feature chains or other backup Continued from previous slide… locks on the inside of the door, as well as a deadbolt. • Guestroom locks are also found on connecting doors and balcony or patio doors (these locks are usually not electronic.) • Most hotels have multiple key-security levels: individual room key, section master key, floor master key, building master key, grand master key, E-key. • All of a hotel’s keys, no matter what level they are, should have controls on them such as time limits. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 3b
  5. 5. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Guestroom Security • In addition to guestroom keys and their control, there are other security measures and procedures for hotel guestrooms. • A peephole in the guestroom door allows guests to see the hallway outside the door and who may be standing at the door. • Hallways should be brightly lit to allow guests to see all areas of the hall. • Telephones are an important part of guestroom security, as they allow guests to call for help when necessary. • Clear instructions, such as “Dial 0 for Emergencies,” should be on or near every guestroom telephone. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 4
  6. 6. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Control of Persons on Premises • Controlling people on the premises is one of the most difficult issues for hotel managers and security staff. • Hotels are private property, so people can be excluded if necessary/appropriate. • Surveillance systems—video cameras, motion detectors, and other security devices—can help hotel staff monitor hotel spaces and identify who may not belong at the hotel. • Cameras are usually connected to monitors in the security office, front desk, telephone department, and/or other areas where there is usually someone to watch them. • Motion detectors and other forms of passive security can be programmed to set off alarms. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 5
  7. 7. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Perimeter and Grounds Control • Surveillance systems provide security monitoring of such outdoor areas as parking lots, pools, tennis courts, and other areas. • Parking lots/garages should be well-lit; they may also have gates (sometimes manned) to control access. • Fences may be needed in high-risk areas. • Outside pools should be fenced in and gated. • Valet parking attendants, landscape staff members, maintenance employees, and others should be trained to watch for unauthorized people on hotel grounds. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 6
  8. 8. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Protection of Assets • Hotel safe deposit boxes and in-room safes can be used by guests to protect their assets; guests must be notified of the availability of safe deposit boxes. • Guests must sign a signature card every time they use their safe deposit boxes, and hotel employees must verify the signatures before allowing access to the boxes. • Safe deposit keys must be secured at all times. • Some hotels have a silent robbery alarm at the front desk that is connected to the local police department. • Hotels may have more than one safe; for example, a main safe and a drop safe (for cash and other items). Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 7a Continued
  9. 9. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Protection of Assets Continued from previous slide… • Bank audits, done on a scheduled basis or without notice, can be used to protect the contents of cashier banks. • Employee changing and locker rooms should be secure and safe to protect employees and their assets. • Some hotels provide locks for employees to secure their clothing and other items in lockers or lockable storage bags. • Most hotel departments have secure storage areas for women’s purses and other employee personal items. • Front desks have lockable drawers or other lockable spaces nearby for employees to secure personal items during a shift. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 7b
  10. 10. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Emergency Procedures • The hotel should have well-documented procedures for all emergencies that can be anticipated; these procedures should be included in the initial and ongoing employee training program. • Many hotels invite the local fire department to train employees on how to properly use a fire extinguisher. • Lifeguards must be properly trained on water safety and CPR. • Front desk staff must know what to do during a robbery or when a guest calls asking for medical assistance. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 8a Continued
  11. 11. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Emergency Procedures Continued from previous slide… • If a hotel is located in a hurricane or flood-prone area, its staff must know what to do when these emergencies arise. • If a fire is reported, all employees should know how to respond. • Employees must be trained in how to assist disabled guests during an emergency. • All states require guests to be notified in their guestrooms of emergency exits and procedures. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 8b
  12. 12. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Communications • Good communication forms the backbone of any successful security program. • During emergency situations, radios and pagers should be provided to key personnel. • Security information should be posted in high-traffic employee areas. • Security should be a frequent topic of conversation at department meetings and other staff meetings. • Security intelligence should be reported to employees. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 9a Continued
  13. 13. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Communications Continued from previous slide… • Employees should be given specific instructions on what to do when facing a security problem. • Hotels should have procedures in place for front desk agents to follow when guests ask for medical assistance; in real emergencies, the local emergency medical service (EMS) should be called. • Hotel employees should be trained on how to communicate with guests during an emergency. • Hotel employees should be aware of the hotel’s policy concerning media contact during emergencies. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 9b
  14. 14. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Security Records • Any activity that has a security-related dimension should be recorded for future reference (for example, when an E-key is issued or a cashier bank audit is performed). • Written reports should be made about robberies, assaults, personal injuries to guests or employees, and property damage or theft. • Security records include vehicle maintenance records and preventive maintenance records. • Security records allow hotel management to track issues, protect the hotel from legal action, and assist the hotel with insurance claims. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 10
  15. 15. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Staff Security Procedures • Front desk employees should never mention a guest’s room number out loud. • Front desk agents should require identification from anyone who comes to the front desk and asks for a key. • Room attendants should not allow anyone to enter a guestroom without a key. • Valet parking attendants should use a three-part form to control cars. • Hotels should provide guest safety information in each guestroom. • Guests should be asked for a room key (or other proof of occupancy) when they want to charge purchases to their rooms. • Employees should immediately report possible security issues. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 11
  16. 16. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Security Issues with Payment Cards • Hotels must be extremely careful to keep card data secure; some countries and states have laws regarding this issue. • The payment card industry has imposed its own comprehensive set of security requirements; all businesses that accept payment cards must comply with the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS). • Payment card industry standards deal with the collection, storage, transmission, and use of customer and account information. • Security issues include payment card fraud, identity theft, and misuse of data. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 12
  17. 17. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Identity Theft • Dumpster diving • Skimming • Change of address Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 13
  18. 18. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Effective Ways to Secure Payment Card Numbers • “Mask” card numbers on folios, POS receipts, confirmations, screen displays, and reports • Destroy obsolete transaction records • Secure all databases containing card numbers from unauthorized access • Secure back-up tapes from unauthorized removal • Use systems that encrypt card numbers Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 14
  19. 19. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Management’s Role in Security • Managers should develop security guidelines that address their hotels’ unique security needs; legal counsel should review these guidelines. • Once reviewed, security guidelines should be communicated to all employees, if possible on a department-by-department basis. • Due to employee turnover and changes in job assignments, security guidelines should be reviewed periodically. • Lodging properties should clearly define the security role of their managers. • All managers (and all employees) should be constantly alert to possible security breaches. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 15
  20. 20. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Hotel Areas of Vulnerability • Hotels must be sensitive to their hospitality image when designing security programs. • Hotels must use adequate procedures for checking and giving credit to guests, while taking care not to offend them. • Physical assets such as tableware, ashtrays, linens, and towels are often stolen from hotels by guests. • Employee theft is another area of vulnerability for hotels. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 16
  21. 21. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Hotel Security Requirements • The number of lodging properties, the variety of lodging concepts, and the varying communities in which lodging properties are located all add to the hotel industry’s security challenges. • No two hotels have the same security requirements; therefore, national security standards are not feasible. • Managers must create and implement security programs that are uniquely suited to their properties—not an easy task. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 17
  22. 22. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Setting Up a Hotel Security Program Setting up a hotel security program typically involves the following elements: • Establishing working relationships with local governmental agencies • Choosing whether to use contract or in-house security personnel • Creating an appropriate and effective security training program for all personnel Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 18
  23. 23. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Relations with Local Governmental Agencies • It is important for hotel managers to establish relationships with personnel in government departments and agencies such as police, fire, health, and emergency management. • Coordinating their security plans with local and regional law enforcement agencies helps hotel managers gain insight into the community’s security and emergency planning issues. • Each government/emergency agency requires special attention, because each is unique. • Hotels that have a security or loss prevention department should make that department the hotel’s official contact with local agencies; in hotels without such a department, the hotel’s general manager or front office manager often assumes this role. • Hotel managers should cultivate cooperative relationships with local law enforcement and other agencies. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 19a Continued
  24. 24. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Relations with Local Governmental Agencies • Managers should invite appropriate law enforcement Continued from previous slide… personnel to visit the hotel; some hotels hire off-duty police officers for security purposes. • The local fire department can train hotel managers and employees in how to use fire extinguishers and help managers identify fire escape routes and create evacuation procedures. • Hotels should establish relationships with local hospitals. • Hotel managers should be involved in local and regional emergency planning. Hotels and government agencies should understand each other’s needs. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 19b
  25. 25. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Security Staffing • A hotel must decide whether to hire its own full-time security personnel, outsource the security function by contracting with a local security company, arrange for part-time protection with local off-duty police officers, or some combination of these options. • Some hotels assign security responsibilities to a member of the management staff, such as a resident or assistant manager, chief engineer, or human resources director. • Some hotels have a full-time security staff. • If hotels hire their own security staff, they must answer questions such as: Will this staff wear uniforms? Will some or all of the staff be armed? Which work shifts need security personnel? • Lodging industry security executives oppose the use of firearms by security staff. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 20
  26. 26. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Security Staffing: Contract Security Companies • May be able to provide sophisticated security services at considerable savings • Provide screened, tested, and trained personnel • Provide consulting services: • Surveys of hotel security requirements • Debugging sweeps • Data processing security • Contingency planning: bomb threats/disasters Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 21a Continued
  27. 27. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Security Staffing: Contract Security Companies • What hotels should look for when hiring a contract security Continued from previous slide… company: • Security guard training programs • Previous lodging experience • State certification (if applicable) • Frequent property inspections to check on guards • Ability to increase staff for large-scale emergencies • Daily incident reporting to hotel management • Good rate of client retention • Potential liability and workers’ compensation issues if hotel managers give instructions to contract security employees Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 21b
  28. 28. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Security Staffing: In-House Security Staff Advantages of using in-house security staff include the following: • Greater control over security officers • Training can be more directly related to the lodging industry • Quality of the personnel is under the direct control of the hotel • More effective integration with other hotel departments • More loyalty to the hotel • Career paths can reduce security officer turnover Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 22
  29. 29. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Security Staffing: Off-Duty Police Pros • Superior training in reacting to security incidents • Knowledge of the law • Better able to recognize criminals • Immediately recognized as authorities • May enhance police response to incidents Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 23a Continued
  30. 30. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Security Staffing: Off-Duty Police Continued from previous slide… Cons • Trained more toward apprehension than prevention • May be required to carry firearms • May not be permitted to wear police uniforms • Fatigue may become a factor Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 23b
  31. 31. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Security Training • Every hotel employee must be trained to identify security issues and take appropriate action. • Everyone must understand the limits of an on-premises security officer’s authority. • All employees should be given a thorough security orientation when hired and ongoing security training throughout their term of employment. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 24a Continued
  32. 32. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Security Training Continued from previous slide… • Training should include all aspects of the protection of guests, the general public, employees, and the assets of guests, employees, and the property. • The unique security needs of each lodging property call for the development of individually designed security systems and training programs. • Each hotel should write down its security standards and procedures in a security manual that can be used to help train employees. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 24b
  33. 33. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry The Authority of a Security Officer • Generally speaking, a hotel security officer has no more authority than any other private citizen. • Tort law permits an injured party to bring a lawsuit for damages against a security officer, as well as the employing property, for such unreasonable conduct as false arrest, false imprisonment, malicious prosecution, defamation, slander, and other tortious acts. • Citizen’s arrests: A security officer should make a citizen’s arrest only if a police officer cannot respond in time and good judgment requires prompt action. • Most states permit arrests by private citizens under certain circumstances; security officers must be familiar with the statutory arrest authority of private citizens in the state in which he or she is employed. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 25a Continued
  34. 34. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry The Authority of a Security Officer Continued from previous slide… • An arrest made without proper legal authority may constitute false arrest/imprisonment and could result in civil and criminal liability on the part of the security officer and civil liability on the part of the lodging property. • In some states, after a citizen’s arrest a security officer can search someone for an offensive weapon under certain circumstances. • A security officer should use only such force as is reasonably necessary to effect a lawful arrest or to prevent the escape of a person under custody; if excessive or unreasonable force is used, the security officer may be subject to criminal and civil action, and the hotel to a civil action for damages. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 25b
  35. 35. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry The Team Concept • The goal of a hotel’s security training program is to turn the hotel’s entire staff into a security-conscious team. • In a team concept, all staff members regard security as an aspect of their jobs. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 26a Continued
  36. 36. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry The Team Concept Continued from previous slide… • All staff members should be instructed to: • Be alert for and report any suspicious activities or persons • Avoid confronting a suspicious individual • Report any drug paraphernalia or other suspicious items • Alert security when guests have large but empty pieces of luggage • Check on the proper posting of innkeeper laws • Check to make sure that information/tent cards providing security information to guests are in their proper locations Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 26b
  37. 37. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Security and the Law • Every state has its own statutes and court rulings on innkeeper laws. • Lodging managers and security personnel should read the innkeeper laws of their state and review recent court and jury decisions dealing with hotel security matters. • More and more lawsuits are being filed every year, and lodging properties are not immune from this trend. • The hospitality industry, with its special emphasis on people and personal services, represents an area where the possibility for litigation is very great. Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 27
  38. 38. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Legal Concepts • Reasonable care • Foreseeability • Proximate cause • Negligence • Damages Compensatory Punitive Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 28a Continued
  39. 39. Chapter 7: Security and the Lodging Industry Legal Concepts Continued from previous slide… • Trial court Plaintiff Defendant Summary judgment Directed verdict Judgment notwithstanding the verdict Appeals Appellant (party appealing) Appellee (respondent) Managing Front Office Operations PowerPoint 28b

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