Developing
MicroPasts
CAA, 24 April 2014
Developing
MicroPasts
CAA, 24 April 2014
Chiara Bonacchi
UCL Institute of Archaeo...
Crowd-sourcing in archaeology
• Crowd-sourcing as
– the practice of seeking information, services or funds in small chunks...
Crowd-sourcing projects
• Diverse range:
– Inspecting imagery for
archaeological features
– Transcribing papyri
– Interrog...
Crowd-funding projects
• Ranging from excavations to
dissertations
• Using existing or new
dedicated platforms
• Varying d...
Observations
• Mainly contributory models
• Little evaluation done
ContributoryContributory
CollaborativeCollaborative
Co-...
Introducing MicroPasts
• A collaboration between UCL
and the British Museum
• Funded by the AHRC, Digital
transformations ...
Aim
• To develop and test an online space where mixed groups of
archaeological enthusiasts collaborate to:
- produce innov...
April
Launch
Day!
Launch
Day!
MicroPasts website
micropasts.org
Component 1: crowd-sourcing platform
crowdsourced.micropasts.org
Crowd-sourcing applications
• 4 applications
• Focused on British Prehistory
Help cataloguing
• 30,000 index cards of all
known Bronze Age metal
artefact finds in the UK from
1800 to 1983
Transcription and geo-referencing
Help creating 3D models
• 3D SfM models of palstaves
recorded in the British Museum
Bronze Age Index (Photoscan)
Image masking
Component 2: community forum
community.micropasts.org
• Discourse (https://github.com/discourse/discourse)
• For research ...
Component 3: crowd-funding platform
• Neighbor.ly
(https://github.com/neighborly/neighborly)
• Catarse
(https://github.com...
Evaluation: aims
• How do online communities of interest in the human past form and
develop through the MicroPasts platfor...
Evaluation: methodology
• Approach
– Quantitative / qualitative
– Focus on MP platforms and
social media / ‘control cases’...
Coming from…
• Entry survey on completion of
first crowd-sourcing task
– ‘Circles’, whether works with
archaeology / histo...
Suggesting that…
• Community building:
– 195 registered members
– UK and US focus
– 55% of respondents not
working in arch...
Next steps
• Guidance and purposiveness
– [3D model viewer]
– Information on the Bronze Age
Index / British prehistory / 3...
Challenges
• Time in relation to the
complexity of the platform
– Long development times and
little space for front-end
ev...
Developing
MicroPast
Developing
MicroPast
Thank you!
c.bonacchi@ucl.ac.uk
Thank you!
c.bonacchi@ucl.ac.uk
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CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology: Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges

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Chiara Bonacchi, Daniel Pett, Andrew Bevan and Adi Keinan-Schoonbaert
Paper presented at Computer Applications in Archaeology Conference 2014, 22nd - 25th April 2014, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, Paris as part of Session 12: Community Archaeology and Technology. Session organisers: Nicole Beale and Eleonora Gandolfi. Session blog: http://blog.soton.ac.uk/comarch/

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  • OpenLayers is a JavaScript library for building map applications on the web.
  • CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology: Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges

    1. 1. Developing MicroPasts CAA, 24 April 2014 Developing MicroPasts CAA, 24 April 2014 Chiara Bonacchi UCL Institute of Archaeology with Andrew Bevan (UCL) Daniel Pett (British Museum) Adi Keinan-Schoonbaert (UCL) Chiara Bonacchi UCL Institute of Archaeology with Andrew Bevan (UCL) Daniel Pett (British Museum) Adi Keinan-Schoonbaert (UCL)
    2. 2. Crowd-sourcing in archaeology • Crowd-sourcing as – the practice of seeking information, services or funds in small chunks from large groups of people, over the internet (definitions discussed in Dunn and Hedges 2012) • Increasingly explored for supporting public audiences’ interaction with archaeology – Participation in research – Participation in micro-financing
    3. 3. Crowd-sourcing projects • Diverse range: – Inspecting imagery for archaeological features – Transcribing papyri – Interrogating built architecture – Public recording of metal finds…
    4. 4. Crowd-funding projects • Ranging from excavations to dissertations • Using existing or new dedicated platforms • Varying degrees of success
    5. 5. Observations • Mainly contributory models • Little evaluation done ContributoryContributory CollaborativeCollaborative Co-creativeCo-creative HostedHosted Models for participation: Public Participation in Scientific Research Project, further elaborated on by Simon
    6. 6. Introducing MicroPasts • A collaboration between UCL and the British Museum • Funded by the AHRC, Digital transformations in community research co-production
    7. 7. Aim • To develop and test an online space where mixed groups of archaeological enthusiasts collaborate to: - produce innovative open datasets via crowd-sourcing (e.g. CC0, CC-BY) - develop new research projects into archaeology, history and heritage (sometimes involving crowd-sourcing) - micro-fund those new collaborative projects via crowd-funding
    8. 8. April Launch Day! Launch Day!
    9. 9. MicroPasts website micropasts.org
    10. 10. Component 1: crowd-sourcing platform crowdsourced.micropasts.org
    11. 11. Crowd-sourcing applications • 4 applications • Focused on British Prehistory
    12. 12. Help cataloguing • 30,000 index cards of all known Bronze Age metal artefact finds in the UK from 1800 to 1983
    13. 13. Transcription and geo-referencing
    14. 14. Help creating 3D models • 3D SfM models of palstaves recorded in the British Museum Bronze Age Index (Photoscan)
    15. 15. Image masking
    16. 16. Component 2: community forum community.micropasts.org • Discourse (https://github.com/discourse/discourse) • For research and platform co-design
    17. 17. Component 3: crowd-funding platform • Neighbor.ly (https://github.com/neighborly/neighborly) • Catarse (https://github.com/catarse/catarse) • Micro-funding of projects co- designed via the forum or externally • 3 seed projects initially – London’s Lost Waterway – Mapping waterway sites, and transcribing relevant documents
    18. 18. Evaluation: aims • How do online communities of interest in the human past form and develop through the MicroPasts platforms? • How do different contributors engage with archaeology and the past via the MicroPasts platforms, through time, and what is the value of that engagement for community members including institutions? • What is the sustainability of the MicroPasts platforms, and the applicability of a similar model in other countries?
    19. 19. Evaluation: methodology • Approach – Quantitative / qualitative – Focus on MP platforms and social media / ‘control cases’ amongst target audiences – Online / offline – Link info on: contributors’ profile, opinions, behaviour; data produced; their re-use – Taking time into account • Methods (at different stages) – Online surveys – Talks / meet-ups – Google analytics – Pybossa statistics – Diary study – Social media data analysis (cultural interests and practices) – Text analysis and SNA
    20. 20. Coming from… • Entry survey on completion of first crowd-sourcing task – ‘Circles’, whether works with archaeology / history as part of main job, age, email • Forum, Google analytics, Pybossa statistics (Very!) initial data: 16-23 April
    21. 21. Suggesting that… • Community building: – 195 registered members – UK and US focus – 55% of respondents not working in archaeology / history – 24% within our immediate network • Engagement: – Photo masking: prevalent ‘entry’ application – Transcription: fewer people, but the most dedicated ones • Number of tasks • Anonymous contributors: 23- 35% on transcription, 53% on masking – Need for more guidance / visualisation (Very!) initial data: 16-23 April
    22. 22. Next steps • Guidance and purposiveness – [3D model viewer] – Information on the Bronze Age Index / British prehistory / 3D modelling – Development of badges • Tasks – Transcription of ‘discovery cards’ • Crowd-funding platform
    23. 23. Challenges • Time in relation to the complexity of the platform – Long development times and little space for front-end evaluation – Need to co-design the platform as we go along / challenge of not losing users in the process • Planning an evaluation that – Does not disrupt people’s engagement – Is discrete but open and ethically compliant • Being ready to adapt the evaluation plan in response to people’s interaction while maintaining coherence • Adoption of new funding practices within a university environment (crowd-funding)
    24. 24. Developing MicroPast Developing MicroPast Thank you! c.bonacchi@ucl.ac.uk Thank you! c.bonacchi@ucl.ac.uk

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