Share and Sharealike – The How and Whyof Sharing Collections OnlineNick Poole, CEO, Collections Trust (@NickPoole1)
The presentation…
That became a research project…
That became a book…
Initial question:“There are many different ways of opening up collections online foraccess and engagement. Each one costs ...
Access ≠ value
Open access ≠ fewer sales
Commercial ≠ profit-making
Content ≠ metadata
‘Digital’ ≠ an audience
Let’s start with:- Audience- Culture- Mission
So what are the options?
The continuum of use…                            CONTENT           FUN                 LEARNING      OUTREACH   A BIT     ...
Content-based experiences…
Your own…
3rd party…
Metadata-based promotional/finding tools…
Your own…
3rd party…
Return on Investment•   Achieving your cultural mission and/or objectives•   Delivering on your public task•   Enhancing t...
http://www.google.com/culturalinstitute
Google Cultural InstituteEffort:                   4Upside:                   Exposure through Google                     ...
Google Art ProjectEffort:                 6Upside:                 Exposure through Google                        Gorgeous...
Wikimedia CommonsEffort:                 5Upside:                 Huge potential audience                        Fits with...
Commercial Picture LibrariesEffort:          4Upside: Money        Exposure        Enhanced metadataDownsides:      Very s...
Your Own Picture LibraryEffort:                  10Upside:                  Money                         Politics        ...
EuropeanaEffort:                 7Upside:                 Exposure - huge demand for UK content                        Pol...
Culture GridEffort:          4Upside: Share it once, deliver it to multiple channels        Simplified process for partici...
BSI PAS 197       BSI PAS 198                ACCREDITATION     BENCHMARKSPDF/XML/PRINT                                    ...
Key messages:How you share your collections online is defined by your audience, your culture, yourvalues and your mission....
Please help me build on this research:  http://tiny.cc/sharingcollections
Nick PooleChief Executive, Collections Trustnick@collectionstrust.org.ukhttp://www.slideshare.net/nickpooletwitter @NickPo...
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Sharing Collections Online

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Presentation to the UK Museums on the Web 'Strategically Digital' event

Sharing Collections Online

  1. 1. Share and Sharealike – The How and Whyof Sharing Collections OnlineNick Poole, CEO, Collections Trust (@NickPoole1)
  2. 2. The presentation…
  3. 3. That became a research project…
  4. 4. That became a book…
  5. 5. Initial question:“There are many different ways of opening up collections online foraccess and engagement. Each one costs my museum something.How do I decide which ones to go with?”
  6. 6. Access ≠ value
  7. 7. Open access ≠ fewer sales
  8. 8. Commercial ≠ profit-making
  9. 9. Content ≠ metadata
  10. 10. ‘Digital’ ≠ an audience
  11. 11. Let’s start with:- Audience- Culture- Mission
  12. 12. So what are the options?
  13. 13. The continuum of use… CONTENT FUN LEARNING OUTREACH A BIT A LOT AGGREGATION RESEARCH COLLECTIONS MANAGEMENT DATA MINING METADATA
  14. 14. Content-based experiences…
  15. 15. Your own…
  16. 16. 3rd party…
  17. 17. Metadata-based promotional/finding tools…
  18. 18. Your own…
  19. 19. 3rd party…
  20. 20. Return on Investment• Achieving your cultural mission and/or objectives• Delivering on your public task• Enhancing the status of your museum or gallery• Raising the public profile of the organisation• Establishing new revenue streams• Increased revenue from existing image licensing/commercial activity• Improved balance of commercial revenue against grant-in-aid or other support• Access to new funding streams (such as European funding programmes)• Advocating the importance of collections as a key part of service delivery• Improved case for collections management and/or documentation• Opening up tasks for collaboration and crowdsourcing• Improving the quality and consistency of your collections information
  21. 21. http://www.google.com/culturalinstitute
  22. 22. Google Cultural InstituteEffort: 4Upside: Exposure through Google User-focussed tools for digital curation Promotes re-use of your existing imagesDownsides: Not focused on sending people/value back to you Google is a business Only takes content around selected themesReturn on Investment: Reputational Levels of usage not knownhttp://g-cultural-institute.appspot.com/signup
  23. 23. Google Art ProjectEffort: 6Upside: Exposure through Google Gorgeous gigapixel imagesDownsides: Very selective focus Google is a business It’s a ‘walled garden’ Gigapixel imagesReturn on Investment: Reputational 20m visitors in first 12 months 200k user-created ‘collections’
  24. 24. Wikimedia CommonsEffort: 5Upside: Huge potential audience Fits with the cultural mission Promoting open re-useDownsides: Huge potential audience Requires CC0 IrrevocableReturn on Investment: Cultural Audience
  25. 25. Commercial Picture LibrariesEffort: 4Upside: Money Exposure Enhanced metadataDownsides: Very selective Out of your hands Retain 25-50% of the licensing feesReturn on Investment: Financial Depends on the collection 500 high-profile works – c. £5k - £12k per annum 2000 mid-range works – c. £5k - £30k per annum
  26. 26. Your Own Picture LibraryEffort: 10Upside: Money Politics Access to imagesDownsides: High upfront costs High staff/running costsReturn on Investment: Organisational Picture library revenue supports further digitisation Picture library activities support other functionsV&A Images revenue for 2008-9 was projected at £350,000 (20k images), of which62% was estimated to come from commercial image licensing….
  27. 27. EuropeanaEffort: 7Upside: Exposure - huge demand for UK content Political/reputational value Access to future European funding Access to apps, labs, network, expertiseDownsides: Won’t take data directly from your museum Your data is presented alongside everyone else’s Your metadata in their data modelReturn on Investment: Audience 6m searches on Europeana this year (23m records) Potential access to future EU digitisation funding
  28. 28. Culture GridEffort: 4Upside: Share it once, deliver it to multiple channels Simplified process for participating in Europeana Easily create collaborative, cross-search projects Apps & widgetsDownsides: Limited direct audience Mapping your dataReturn on Investment: Political 312,149 searches in 2012 Not a public-facing service – primary audiences are museums andacademics
  29. 29. BSI PAS 197 BSI PAS 198 ACCREDITATION BENCHMARKSPDF/XML/PRINT GUIDANCE + SCHEMA COMPLIANCE NEW IDEAS (23,000) WORLDWIDE COMMUNITY (7,600)
  30. 30. Key messages:How you share your collections online is defined by your audience, your culture, yourvalues and your mission.High-quality images of high-value items, decent SEO and an API will unlock pretty much allof these optionsCommercial activity rarely generates profit, but it can deliver income that can be re-invested in opening up the collection.A very small proportion of your collection is likely to be commercially valuable – be harshwith yourself (or get someone else to be)Sharing high-quality images for open non-commercial use drives value and new businessto commercial image sales.With an open, standards-compliant, well-documented API (& a SPECTRUM-compliantsystem), you can make use of metadata-based promotional tools without having to doadditional work.
  31. 31. Please help me build on this research: http://tiny.cc/sharingcollections
  32. 32. Nick PooleChief Executive, Collections Trustnick@collectionstrust.org.ukhttp://www.slideshare.net/nickpooletwitter @NickPoole1

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