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- relates to a value
system of cultural
beliefs; standards
of conduct;
And what a society
considers as
being…
or
Ethics author Mary Guy defines ethics as
“that behavior which is the right thing to do, given the
circumstances.”
Ethical behavior involved four key principles:
 Honesty
 Integrity
Fairness
and CONCERN for others.
Honesty + Integrity +
Fairness – Concern to others =
Critical question:
• things commonly thought to be good, like money, knowledge,
love and power, can be misused and therefore not good
without...
– founder of critical philosophy, a moral law that is
unconditional or absolute for all agents, the validity or claim of w...
Moral Imperatives - a principle that is from a person’s mind that would force that person to act it out.
Example:
*Even if a good act makes you feel good, it is not a reward, it’s just a
bonus of what you did said by Kant.
• The rightness or wrongness of actions is to be judged by
the goodness or badness of the consequences of a rule
that ever...
The Greatest Happiness Principle:
Happiness = pleasure, and
the absence of pain
Unhappiness = pain, and
the absence of ple...
Everyone’s happiness
counts equally.
Whether an action is morally right or wrong depends entirely on its consequences. An action is
right if it brings about th...
“Suppose that a person has promised to
meet a friend for a social engagement,
but on the way to the agreed upon the
meetin...
*An act is a prima facie duty when there is a moral
reason in favor of doing the act, but one that can be
outweighed by ot...
• (a) Duties of Fidelity:
-are duties to keep one’s promises and contracts and not to engage in deception.
• (b) Duties of...
• “the acceptance of moral principles”
• “Veil of ignorance”
-
• Decisions that will be made in this situation will repres...
- a professor in Harvard University
- developed a contract theory in ethics where in the
social and moral order is founded...
equality of access to basic liberties.
He mentions specific liberties from the Bill of Rights:
 Freedom to vote
 Freedom...
more complicated principle, refers to two limitations on
inequality:
• the first limitation concerning a form of recogniti...
– Rawl’s defines as “the successful execution of a rational plan of life.”
FOUR FACTORS OF SELF-RESPECT:
 A belief in one...
ETHICS
applied to
the
WORKPLACE
Two key suggestions have been made as to why
unethical behavior is so widespread:
•
•
5 Cultural Climates that will
describe pose serious ethical
dilemmas for organizations
When organizations engage in illegal behavior or behavior that is considered to be
highly unethical, an individual may “BL...
1. Intentional
2. Responsive
3. Accusatory
4. Public
5. Support seeking
6. Via various media
7. Reputational
8. Straining ...
1) The harm to the public is serious and considerable.
2) The internal channels of the organization have been tried and ex...
• Kant’s Categorical Imperative is difficult to apply in this situation because one could
NOT universalize a maxim of acti...
REFERENCES:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Obillo(revised) ethics in the workplace
Obillo(revised) ethics in the workplace
Obillo(revised) ethics in the workplace
Obillo(revised) ethics in the workplace
Obillo(revised) ethics in the workplace
Obillo(revised) ethics in the workplace
Obillo(revised) ethics in the workplace
Obillo(revised) ethics in the workplace
Obillo(revised) ethics in the workplace
Obillo(revised) ethics in the workplace
Obillo(revised) ethics in the workplace
Obillo(revised) ethics in the workplace
Obillo(revised) ethics in the workplace
Obillo(revised) ethics in the workplace
Obillo(revised) ethics in the workplace
Obillo(revised) ethics in the workplace
Obillo(revised) ethics in the workplace
Obillo(revised) ethics in the workplace
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Obillo(revised) ethics in the workplace

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Ethics in the Workplace: The Role of Organizational Communication

Published in: Leadership & Management
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Obillo(revised) ethics in the workplace

  1. 1. - relates to a value system of cultural beliefs; standards of conduct;
  2. 2. And what a society considers as being… or
  3. 3. Ethics author Mary Guy defines ethics as “that behavior which is the right thing to do, given the circumstances.”
  4. 4. Ethical behavior involved four key principles:  Honesty  Integrity Fairness and CONCERN for others.
  5. 5. Honesty + Integrity + Fairness – Concern to others =
  6. 6. Critical question:
  7. 7. • things commonly thought to be good, like money, knowledge, love and power, can be misused and therefore not good without qualification. • All of the actions that one person use the other person merely as a means to self-advantage (power, fame, money), disregarding other persons as valuable ends in themselves. • Thus, One must never use another person as a means to one's own selfish end.
  8. 8. – founder of critical philosophy, a moral law that is unconditional or absolute for all agents, the validity or claim of which does not depend on any ulterior motive or end. - a Professor of Logic and Metaphysics at University of Konigsberg in 1770. - he wrote philosophical treatises to change the history of Western thought (1781-1798)
  9. 9. Moral Imperatives - a principle that is from a person’s mind that would force that person to act it out.
  10. 10. Example: *Even if a good act makes you feel good, it is not a reward, it’s just a bonus of what you did said by Kant.
  11. 11. • The rightness or wrongness of actions is to be judged by the goodness or badness of the consequences of a rule that everyone should perform the action in like circumstances • Acts that are right tend to promote happiness for all concerned; not just the individual.
  12. 12. The Greatest Happiness Principle: Happiness = pleasure, and the absence of pain Unhappiness = pain, and the absence of pleasure
  13. 13. Everyone’s happiness counts equally.
  14. 14. Whether an action is morally right or wrong depends entirely on its consequences. An action is right if it brings about the best outcome of the choices available. Otherwise it is wrong. The Good: Things (goals, states of affairs) that are worth pursuing and promoting. The Right: the moral rightness (or wrongness) of actions and policies.
  15. 15. “Suppose that a person has promised to meet a friend for a social engagement, but on the way to the agreed upon the meeting point, he sees a serious accident and is in the proposition of being able to bring relief to the victims.”
  16. 16. *An act is a prima facie duty when there is a moral reason in favor of doing the act, but one that can be outweighed by other moral reasons. *An act is a prima facie wrong when there is a moral reason against doing the act, but one that can be outweighed by other moral reasons.
  17. 17. • (a) Duties of Fidelity: -are duties to keep one’s promises and contracts and not to engage in deception. • (b) Duties of Reparations: - a duty to make up for the injuries one has done to others • (c) Duties of Gratitude: - a duty to be grateful for benefactions done to oneself and if possible to show it by benefactions in return • (d) Duties of Justice: • (e) Duties of Beneficence: - • (f) Duties of Self-Improvement - • (g) Duties of Non-Maleficence -
  18. 18. • “the acceptance of moral principles” • “Veil of ignorance” - • Decisions that will be made in this situation will represent fairness and rightness.
  19. 19. - a professor in Harvard University - developed a contract theory in ethics where in the social and moral order is founded on convention or agreement, “the contract”.
  20. 20. equality of access to basic liberties. He mentions specific liberties from the Bill of Rights:  Freedom to vote  Freedom of Speech  Freedom of Assembly  Freedom to own Personal Property  Freedom from arbitrary arrest  Freedom from unreasonable search and seizure
  21. 21. more complicated principle, refers to two limitations on inequality: • the first limitation concerning a form of recognition of prudential concerns • and the second referring to openness of offices. -the second part of this principle assures equal access to the hierarchy of authority and responsibility in society.
  22. 22. – Rawl’s defines as “the successful execution of a rational plan of life.” FOUR FACTORS OF SELF-RESPECT:  A belief in one’s own worth  A belief that one’s plan of life is a worthy one  A belief in one’s ability to carry out the chosen plan of life  Appreciation and confirmation by associates
  23. 23. ETHICS applied to the WORKPLACE
  24. 24. Two key suggestions have been made as to why unethical behavior is so widespread: • •
  25. 25. 5 Cultural Climates that will describe pose serious ethical dilemmas for organizations
  26. 26. When organizations engage in illegal behavior or behavior that is considered to be highly unethical, an individual may “BLOW THE WHISTLE” and reveal the conduct to a regulatory agency or to the news media.
  27. 27. 1. Intentional 2. Responsive 3. Accusatory 4. Public 5. Support seeking 6. Via various media 7. Reputational 8. Straining a “contractual agreement”
  28. 28. 1) The harm to the public is serious and considerable. 2) The internal channels of the organization have been tried and exhausted. 3) Accurate evidence of wrongdoing has been collected and documented. 4) Public knowledge of wrongdoing will force organizational changes and rectify the situation. 5) The harm caused to the organization, its members, and stockholders it outweighed by the public harm.
  29. 29. • Kant’s Categorical Imperative is difficult to apply in this situation because one could NOT universalize a maxim of action to brrach loyalty, or confidence or contracts. And so in tolerating the continuation of the injustice and harm caused by organizational behavior. • The Five Criteria fit a UTILITARIAN analaysis. They are targeted to alleviate serious societal harm. And balancing the harm brought about to the organization and attempts to save the organization harm by giving it an opportunity to correct the situation on its own terms. • ROSS would view the situation as a classic one involving conflicts of PRIMA FACIE DUTIES. The principal conflict between duty of fidelity and non-maleficence. • In Rawl’s the organization’s conduct must be balanced against the right of the public to know about the dangerous and unjust practices of the organization.
  30. 30. REFERENCES: • • • • • • •

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