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Presentation by eddie o connor to oxford energy colloquium march 2015

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Europe cannot achieve its climate and energy goals without a single electricity market underpinned by supergrid. We are moving inexorably to an electric society in Europe and other markets where the customer not the utility is in charge. It will be a future where electric vehicles, demand management and big grids combine. In this "anticipatory society" customers will access power across an electricity Internet giving them far greater choice and flexibility than today.

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Presentation by eddie o connor to oxford energy colloquium march 2015

  1. 1. GRID AND SUPERGRID A EUROPEAN ENERGY FUTURE Oxford University Energy Colloquium March 10th 2015 LEADING THE GLOBAL TRANSITION TO RENEWABLE ENERGY
  2. 2. Boyle Papers 8, fols. 209, The Royal Society http://theappendix.net/issues/2014/7/per chance-to-dream-science-and-the-future Robert Boyle The man who foresaw the electric society
  3. 3. Grid and Supergrid • Supergrid – the background • The policy context • The technology
  4. 4. Mainstream at a glance Founded in 2008 Over 120 employees Active in over 6 countries 17,000 MW in development 334 MW in construction and operation €352 million raised in corporate finance €580 million in project level debt and equity raised 1. 1. 1. Chicago Dublin Berlin Glasgow London Santiago Cape Town Johannesburg Construct, finance and operate renewable energy projects 1. As at May 2014 Mainstream offices Countries in which Mainstream are active
  5. 5. The modern wind turbine A highly efficient industrial power plant First Airtricity Windfarm 6.4MW – 250kw WTG Mainstream Neart na Gaoithe offshore power station 450MW – 6MW WTG
  6. 6. Supergrid
  7. 7. A European industrial initiative with a mutual interest in promoting the policy agenda for a European Supergrid: Who are the Friends of Supergrid?
  8. 8. The electric society Power sector business models Energy demands of modern society Sustainability and climate action • No new fossil plant • Carbon taxes • Large scale variable generation • Big grids • “Utility death spiral” • Utilities as energy services providers • “Intelligent” and active consumers • Electric vehicles and solar pv • Domestic/local storage • Anticipatory technology the “we have done it like this for a century” value chain in developed electricity markets will be turned upside down within the next 10-20 years. UBS August 2014
  9. 9. Generation Onshore wind, coal and gas With thanks to Bloomberg New Energy Finance
  10. 10. What is the Supergrid? • EU 2030 direction of travel: - – EU GHG target – EU RES target – EU Interconnection target – Internal electricity market • The Supergrid is a pan- European transmission network that: - – facilitates the integration of large-scale renewable energy – the balancing and transportation of electricity – with the aim of improving the European market.
  11. 11. Energy Union The 2030 package
  12. 12. Enabling technologies Supergrid and SuperNode
  13. 13. The electric society Power sector business models Energy demands of modern society Sustainability and climate action There is a convergence between the business realities of the utility industry, the energy demands of modern society and our sustainability requirements… ABB 2014 The result will be a grid that is largely automated, applying greater intelligence to operate, monitor and even heal itself. This “smart grid” will be more flexible, more reliable and better able to service the needs of a digital economy… ABB 2014
  14. 14. Supergrid technology Down with hierarchies Schematic of Old and New Grids according to ABB - 2013
  15. 15. Thank you Dr Eddie O’Connor March 2015 www.mainstreamrp.com @MainstreamRP
  16. 16. EU energy trends http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics- explained/index.php/Energy_trends 1990-2012 Falling demand Rising imports Low carbon now largest indigenous EU energy provider

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