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floops<br />Systems Diagrams for Feedback loops<br />
Floops<br />Floops emerge when actor’s actions affect their future actions creating a feedback loop<br />Actor’s acts are ...
Parts of a Floopdiagram<br />Floop diagrams show a single outcome for a given period of cycle time within the growth & dec...
Reading a FloopDiagram: <br />Subject + Verb = Outcome impact<br />Example a lemonade stand inventory Floop: <br />10 Lemo...
Actor & Outcomes<br />Growth Floop<br />Choice point (Subject/Object)<br />Action link (Verb)<br />An Externality<br />Dec...
The 4 Floop Outcomes<br />Decay due to negative feedback by an actor<br />Unbounded Growth due to positive feedback among ...
Positive & Negative Floop Outcomes<br />To ∞ & beyond<br />Death spiral<br />System status<br />System status<br />Time, $...
2 stable states positive & negativeThese are stable due to the net stable state of the actors.<br />Increasing Stabile<br ...
2. Multi-actor Floop<br />1. Simple Floops<br />3. Floop Outcomes can be considered actors with actions in other Floops<br...
Why Floops? <br /><ul><li>Simple graphic way of explaining and sharing a system’s state
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Floops

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A simple graphic feedback langauge for use in showing the state of system and the outcomes from participants in a feedback loop.

Published in: Business, Technology

Floops

  1. 1. floops<br />Systems Diagrams for Feedback loops<br />
  2. 2. Floops<br />Floops emerge when actor’s actions affect their future actions creating a feedback loop<br />Actor’s acts are based on limits, inputs and/or beliefs<br />Outcomes are the results of mutiple actors being linked into feedback loops.<br />Actors influence other actors by changing inputs, beliefs or limits.<br />Floops arise spontaneously, grow and or disappearin different environments.<br />
  3. 3. Parts of a Floopdiagram<br />Floop diagrams show a single outcome for a given period of cycle time within the growth & decay constraints of all the actors<br />Outcome States<br />Components<br />Actor or component<br />Growth Outcome<br />Decay Outcome<br />Link between actors (no arrow head) = stable impact<br />Stabile Outcome<br />arrow head indicates growth or decay<br />Clockwise actors indicate growth action<br />Outcome of Floop<br />Counter Clockwise actors indicate decay action<br />
  4. 4. Reading a FloopDiagram: <br />Subject + Verb = Outcome impact<br />Example a lemonade stand inventory Floop: <br />10 Lemons are squeezed: increasing: lemonade inventory levels. <br />Action growth & Decay limits are explicitly stated for each actor’s actions:<br />Lemonade production capacity is limited to a maximum of 10 glasses/hour of Floop time and a minimum of 0 glasses due system failures.<br />
  5. 5. Actor & Outcomes<br />Growth Floop<br />Choice point (Subject/Object)<br />Action link (Verb)<br />An Externality<br />Decaying Floop<br />Clockwise rotation = externality growth<br />Counter Clockwise rotation = decay<br />Stable Floop<br />Stable Floop<br />
  6. 6. The 4 Floop Outcomes<br />Decay due to negative feedback by an actor<br />Unbounded Growth due to positive feedback among all actors<br />Decreasing to stable Outcome due to a dampener constraint<br />Increasing to stable Outcome due to a dampener constraint<br />
  7. 7. Positive & Negative Floop Outcomes<br />To ∞ & beyond<br />Death spiral<br />System status<br />System status<br />Time, $’s, etc.<br />Time, $’s, etc.<br />
  8. 8. 2 stable states positive & negativeThese are stable due to the net stable state of the actors.<br />Increasing Stabile<br />Decreasing Stabile<br />System status<br />System status<br />Time, $’s, etc.<br />Time, $’s, etc.<br />
  9. 9. 2. Multi-actor Floop<br />1. Simple Floops<br />3. Floop Outcomes can be considered actors with actions in other Floops<br />4. Floop Outcomes combined for a larger system Floop<br />=<br />=<br />=<br />=<br />
  10. 10. Why Floops? <br /><ul><li>Simple graphic way of explaining and sharing a system’s state
  11. 11. limitation of Floops: only representing bounded states & only representational of a single outcome within those boundaries are intentional
  12. 12. Avoid crazy complicated systems diagrams
  13. 13. Complex systems can only by partially understood by definition
  14. 14. Floop constraint’s limit the graphic representation to a small understanding of a piece of a system
  15. 15. Complex systems may be better understood and discussed using multiple Floop diagrams instead of overly complex systems diagrams which are too sensitive to assumptions or represent too many moving parts and boundary conditions.</li>

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