The Net Generation is Here: Get ready or get out  of the way! Don Tapscott, Marc Prensky, Ian Jukes As channelled by: Norm...
Overview <ul><li>Who is this generation? </li></ul><ul><li>What have they experienced? </li></ul><ul><li>How do they use m...
Who is this Generation? <ul><li>the generation of people born between the early 1980s and the early 2000s </li></ul><ul><l...
What this Generation Experiences <ul><li>Access all information via a searchbox (Google) </li></ul><ul><li>Go to school wi...
From: Tapscott, 2008
From: Tapscott, 2008
 
Moshimo Kimi ga - Rin <ul><li>Written over a six month  stretch while Rin was attending high school.  </li></ul><ul><li>20...
Facebook
Facebook <ul><li>½  of Facebook users are students  (2008) </li></ul><ul><li>½  of Facebook are between the ages of 18 and...
Net Gen; Millennials <ul><li>Have characteristics corresponding to technologies/media </li></ul><ul><li>Technologies/Media...
Net Gen vs. their Teachers <ul><li>Receiving information quickly from multiple multimedia sources </li></ul><ul><li>Proces...
 
 
The Net Gen Brain <ul><li>“ Digital immersion has given the Net Gen visual skills that make them superior scanners” </li><...
Digital Generation / iBrain <ul><li>The nineteenth-century French psychologist Jean Piaget... made observations on a child...
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The net generation is here

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  • Most of the literature uses the early 1980s as t he starting point for the net generation. A recent article by Helsper &amp; Eynon argues there are first and second generation digital natives….the emergence of social media and web 2.0 technologies has had a different impact – 1 st gen: 1980-1990 2 nd gen: 1990 -2000
  • Not sure the first or last items are really relevant to our discussion I think the key point is that the net generation is portrayed as constantly connected, immersed in networked, digital technology ….so points 2-5 are most relevant
  • Under the topic of how the net gen uses technology/media, I think it is important to emphasize the notions of interactivity, participation, collaboration …i.e., the argument is that this is not a passive generation like boomers who just sat and watched TV, they actively construct, create, collaborate, participate using the new digital tools….related to this is the claim that they are critical consumers and users of information blah, blah, blah.
  • Point to make here: the growing use of digital technologies is presented as an argument for using them even more, in different aspects of the lives of the net generation …i.e., since they are all using facebook for social purposes we should be using it for educational purposes and that this is what the net generation wants…
  • M uch of this is based on inaccurate assumptions about current teaching and teachers
  • The net generation is here

    1. 1. The Net Generation is Here: Get ready or get out of the way! Don Tapscott, Marc Prensky, Ian Jukes As channelled by: Norm Friesen cc: Wayan Vota
    2. 2. Overview <ul><li>Who is this generation? </li></ul><ul><li>What have they experienced? </li></ul><ul><li>How do they use media? (esp. texting and Facebook) </li></ul><ul><li>E.g. Facebook; Rin, author of Moshimo Kimi ga </li></ul><ul><li>Media use leads to learning preferences </li></ul><ul><li>Media use affects the net gen brain </li></ul>
    3. 3. Who is this Generation? <ul><li>the generation of people born between the early 1980s and the early 2000s </li></ul><ul><li>A generation that is being schooled, and entering higher education </li></ul><ul><li>At the end of the “echo” of the baby boom: the kids of boomers </li></ul><ul><li>Generation Z, Net Generation, Generation @ and Generation 9/11, digitial natives </li></ul>
    4. 4. What this Generation Experiences <ul><li>Access all information via a searchbox (Google) </li></ul><ul><li>Go to school with a cellphone; always in touch </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t read newspapers </li></ul><ul><li>Home is a place with an Internet-connected computer, an X-box, a flatscreen TV </li></ul>
    5. 5. From: Tapscott, 2008
    6. 6. From: Tapscott, 2008
    7. 8. Moshimo Kimi ga - Rin <ul><li>Written over a six month stretch while Rin was attending high school. </li></ul><ul><li>20 million readers; turned into a 142-page hardcover that was the fifth-bestselling novel in Japan in 2007. </li></ul><ul><li>“ My mother didn’t even know that I was writing a novel. So when I told her, I’m coming out with a novel, she was like, what? She didn’t believe it until it appeared in bookstores.” —RIN, JAPANESE NOVELIST </li></ul>
    8. 9. Facebook
    9. 10. Facebook <ul><li>½ of Facebook users are students (2008) </li></ul><ul><li>½ of Facebook are between the ages of 18 and 24 (2008) </li></ul><ul><li>Facebook is: “student space – developmental-ly and generationally specific” </li></ul><ul><li>“ almost 60 percent of students who use social networking talk about education topics online and, surprisingly, more than 50 percent talk specifically about schoolwork” (NSBA, 2007). </li></ul>
    10. 11. Net Gen; Millennials <ul><li>Have characteristics corresponding to technologies/media </li></ul><ul><li>Technologies/Media </li></ul><ul><li>Personal </li></ul><ul><li>Multifunctional </li></ul><ul><li>Wireless </li></ul><ul><li>Multimedia </li></ul><ul><li>communication-centric </li></ul><ul><li>Generational Characteristics </li></ul><ul><li>multitasking, </li></ul><ul><li>always-on communication </li></ul><ul><li>participatory rather than consumerist “engagement with multimedia” ( Hartman, Moskal, and Dziuban, 2005; 6.3 ). </li></ul>Other “generational technologies:” radio, movies, comic books, television, records, cell phones,
    11. 12. Net Gen vs. their Teachers <ul><li>Receiving information quickly from multiple multimedia sources </li></ul><ul><li>Processing pictures, sounds, color, and video before text </li></ul><ul><li>Random access to hyperlinked multimedia information </li></ul><ul><li>To network simultaneously with many others </li></ul><ul><li>Learning &quot;just in time&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Instant gratification with immediate and deferred rewards </li></ul><ul><li>Learning that is relevant, active, instantly useful, and fun </li></ul><ul><li>Slow and controlled release of information from limited sources </li></ul><ul><li>To provide text before pictures, sounds, color, and video </li></ul><ul><li>To provide information linearly, logically, and sequentially </li></ul><ul><li>Students to work independently before they network and interact </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching &quot;just in case&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Deferred gratification and delayed rewards </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching memorization in preparation for standardized tests </li></ul>
    12. 15. The Net Gen Brain <ul><li>“ Digital immersion has given the Net Gen visual skills that make them superior scanners” </li></ul><ul><li>Jenkins argues that video game playing may help people tap into a collective form of intelligence—“distributed cognition.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ there is emerging evidence suggesting that exposure to new technologies may push the Net Gen brain past conventional ‘capacity limitations.’ ” </li></ul>
    13. 16. Digital Generation / iBrain <ul><li>The nineteenth-century French psychologist Jean Piaget... made observations on a child’s cognitive development well over one hundred years ago that have been very useful in understanding what is going on inside a child’s brain as he or she ages. However, the rapid evolution of the brain that is occurring today is making many reconsider the validity of traditional thought on cognitive development. </li></ul>

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