Pump Up the VolumeSound, Brands and Social ChangeWorld Usability Day São Paulo 2011Noel FranusVP/Experience DirectorCrispi...
Our time today will be focused onmusic, sound, voice and silence and itsrole in shaping the way we understandand interact ...
First, a video: what is sound?
Let’s talk about what we do.
We are usability professionals.Information architects.Interaction designers.We don’t design. We Design.
Looking back, design has for a long timebeen left to graphic designers andarchitects. The people who crafted theworld we s...
Then came the internet.
Then came the internet.And the developers went nuts.
Then came the internet.And the developers went nuts.(Who wouldn’t?)
Many internet professionalsdesigned complex websitesand applications as though allusers were expert users.
And then the folks in the suits startedmeasuring performance. They sawopportunities for improvement.A handful of us stood ...
“User Experience” wasn’t born then,but it certainly grew quickly.
Which brings us to today.Here we are celebrating a disciplinethat barely existed 15 years ago.Now it’s thriving wherever t...
We experience designers lookat the whole of an experience.As Martyn Ware said in the video,we’re focused not exclusively o...
Today, our world is rich, and ourdesign opportunity is even richer.Everything that can be networked willbe networked. And ...
And our ability to influence all of thosemoments is greater than it’s ever been.
Are we thinking outside ofthe box often enough?Does our past work become acomforting crutch which limits our future?
What about sound?
It colors how we understand theworld: what we think, how we feeland what we do.
Why do most of us love music butknow little about how it works?And even fewer of us think of itas an opportunity in our wo...
Before we dive deep:Enough about us. Let’s talk about me.
Me: Director of Experience Design atCrispin Porter + Bogusky in Boulder,Colorado.Prior to this I’ve had roles running UXag...
Let’s get back to you.
You’re exposed to thousandsof sounds each day.Any favorites? Least favorites?
Another video.
Sound is a key trigger toemotion and memories.
Daniel Levitin“Our neuroimgaing studiesshow amygdala activationto music...repetition, whendone skillfully, is emotionallys...
Let’s consider how music and soundimpact us in a physiological sense.(Nerd alert.)
The field of cymatics explores theeffect that sound has on physical matter.
body
We’re physically and emotionally wiredto respond to music and sound in waysthat are not of our own choosing.
In other words: you’re human.YOU CAN’T WIN.
Naturally, this impactshow we think and what we do.
Larry Light, McDonald’s“We’re not advertising any more...what we have increased substantially isthe effectiveness...when y...
The numbers add up.• People are 42% more likely to remember a  commercial when the music matches someone’s  expectations f...
What do we mean by “fit?”A few years back my an agency of minecreated this soundscape for a retail client’sfirst 60 location...
That’s great for brands.How can we use music andsound to make a better world?
Let’s take a look at who’s done what.with...A brief history of the useof sound for the purposes ofgood and evil.
Starting with evil.
The Ghost Army“In June 1944, a secret U.S. Army unitwent into action in Normandy. Theweapons they deployed were decidedlyu...
Fast forward: 1989. The UnitedStates attempts to remove ManuelNoriega from his post in Panama.
It was a serious effort. Theydeployed troops with significantweaponry, negotiators, and...
...astonishingly loud heavy metal andtop-40 pop hits.This music was blared from tanks andpointed at the Vatican consulate,...
Another popular favorite: Long Range AcousticDevices. Within 300 meters or less: big headache.100 meters or less: permanen...
And now, for the good.
Music regularly plays a role increating cultural identity and inclusion.Mama Eu Quero!God Bless America!Fight for Your Rig...
Public transit.Seven years ago my friends at EliasArts built a suite of brand-basedsounds for France’s TGV. It served asa ...
(More) public transit:Julian Treasure and his firm The SoundAgency recently created a generativesoundscape for the Glasgow ...
Martyn Ware, Vince Clarke and their firm Sonic ID/IllustriousCompany designed the Sensory Theatre at the Bath, UKThreeways ...
GPS walkingtours for the blind
Some bad, some good.The truth? Sound is a tool for either.The grey areas are where this getsinteresting.
“The road train to hell is paved withthe best intentions.”In Tokyo, the main subway stations each have aunique musical sig...
Is a healthy soundscapeavailable only to the wealthy?
Best Buy Movie Mode is an app we created for best Buy’s tie-inwith Despicable Me. The app translates the Minion-ese into E...
We worked with Old Navy to provideShazam-enabled links to coupons andshopping tools in real-time.
Mosquito quiz: raise your hand if youcan hear these tones...
What about Siri?
So why is this our opportunity?
Meet Mary Meeker. She does a lot offorecasting in her job as an analystKPCB. In late October she made abold announcement: ...
We’re at the beginning ofsomething big.And it’s all making noise.
This feels a lot like 1997in San Francisco again.
Whose job is it to understand thenuances that are involved in designingcomplex interactive systems?Whose job is it to know...
It’s not the visual designer’s job.It’s not the coder’s job. Or thestrategist’s, the account manager—or even the sound des...
We’re user experience experts.It’s our obligation.
If we don’t take up this role—that of connecting the dots for thepeople who use the things we make—then someone else will....
Then the suits will get involved...
What can you do today?
1. Start listening.
2. Start questioning.
“I am a chord. You are a chord.”Let’s make some music.
Thank you.             @nfranus       nfranus@cpbgroup.com
Sound, Brands and Social Change
Sound, Brands and Social Change
Sound, Brands and Social Change
Sound, Brands and Social Change
Sound, Brands and Social Change
Sound, Brands and Social Change
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Sound, Brands and Social Change

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[From World Usability Day in São Paulo, November 2011]

Most of us are familiar with the concept of sonic branding: the intentional use of music, sound, voice and silence to build relationships between people and brands.

How can we apply the principles of sonic branding for the greater good—in the spaces we create, the products we design and the interactions we enable?

We'll take a curious, closer look at some sonic-branding fundamentals and consider real-world inspirations for what it takes to engage the hearts, minds and behaviors of anyone with ears.

Noel Franus, Crispin Porter + Bogusky

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Sound, Brands and Social Change

  1. 1. Pump Up the VolumeSound, Brands and Social ChangeWorld Usability Day São Paulo 2011Noel FranusVP/Experience DirectorCrispin, Porter + Bogusky
  2. 2. Our time today will be focused onmusic, sound, voice and silence and itsrole in shaping the way we understandand interact with the world around us.
  3. 3. First, a video: what is sound?
  4. 4. Let’s talk about what we do.
  5. 5. We are usability professionals.Information architects.Interaction designers.We don’t design. We Design.
  6. 6. Looking back, design has for a long timebeen left to graphic designers andarchitects. The people who crafted theworld we saw and touched every day.
  7. 7. Then came the internet.
  8. 8. Then came the internet.And the developers went nuts.
  9. 9. Then came the internet.And the developers went nuts.(Who wouldn’t?)
  10. 10. Many internet professionalsdesigned complex websitesand applications as though allusers were expert users.
  11. 11. And then the folks in the suits startedmeasuring performance. They sawopportunities for improvement.A handful of us stood up and said“I can do this better.”
  12. 12. “User Experience” wasn’t born then,but it certainly grew quickly.
  13. 13. Which brings us to today.Here we are celebrating a disciplinethat barely existed 15 years ago.Now it’s thriving wherever technologylives. (And many places where it doesn’t.)
  14. 14. We experience designers lookat the whole of an experience.As Martyn Ware said in the video,we’re focused not exclusively on theend result, but on all the small parts ofwhich it is comprised. That’s our thing.
  15. 15. Today, our world is rich, and ourdesign opportunity is even richer.Everything that can be networked willbe networked. And we’re no longerdealing with just websites or apps.We’re creating products, places,spaces and new behaviors.
  16. 16. And our ability to influence all of thosemoments is greater than it’s ever been.
  17. 17. Are we thinking outside ofthe box often enough?Does our past work become acomforting crutch which limits our future?
  18. 18. What about sound?
  19. 19. It colors how we understand theworld: what we think, how we feeland what we do.
  20. 20. Why do most of us love music butknow little about how it works?And even fewer of us think of itas an opportunity in our work?
  21. 21. Before we dive deep:Enough about us. Let’s talk about me.
  22. 22. Me: Director of Experience Design atCrispin Porter + Bogusky in Boulder,Colorado.Prior to this I’ve had roles running UXagencies and also directing sonicbranding efforts for the largest brands inbanking, gaming and technology.
  23. 23. Let’s get back to you.
  24. 24. You’re exposed to thousandsof sounds each day.Any favorites? Least favorites?
  25. 25. Another video.
  26. 26. Sound is a key trigger toemotion and memories.
  27. 27. Daniel Levitin“Our neuroimgaing studiesshow amygdala activationto music...repetition, whendone skillfully, is emotionallysatisfying to our brains, andmakes the listeningexperience as pleasurableas it is.”
  28. 28. Let’s consider how music and soundimpact us in a physiological sense.(Nerd alert.)
  29. 29. The field of cymatics explores theeffect that sound has on physical matter.
  30. 30. body
  31. 31. We’re physically and emotionally wiredto respond to music and sound in waysthat are not of our own choosing.
  32. 32. In other words: you’re human.YOU CAN’T WIN.
  33. 33. Naturally, this impactshow we think and what we do.
  34. 34. Larry Light, McDonald’s“We’re not advertising any more...what we have increased substantially isthe effectiveness...when you increaserelevance, it sticks in people’s minds.”
  35. 35. The numbers add up.• People are 42% more likely to remember a commercial when the music matches someone’s expectations for a brand.• 25% more likely to like an advertisement.• 39% less likely to remember a specific brand’s ad when the music didn’t fit (versus no music at all)• 20% less likely to purchase from a brand with music that didn’t fit (versus no music at all). North, Mackenzie, Law. Journal of Applied Psychology, 2004.
  36. 36. What do we mean by “fit?”A few years back my an agency of minecreated this soundscape for a retail client’sfirst 60 locations around the world.Listening quiz: what do they do or sell?
  37. 37. That’s great for brands.How can we use music andsound to make a better world?
  38. 38. Let’s take a look at who’s done what.with...A brief history of the useof sound for the purposes ofgood and evil.
  39. 39. Starting with evil.
  40. 40. The Ghost Army“In June 1944, a secret U.S. Army unitwent into action in Normandy. Theweapons they deployed were decidedlyunusual: hundreds of inflatable tanks anda one-of-a-kind collection of sound effectsrecords. Their mission was to use bluff,deception, and trickery to save lives.”
  41. 41. Fast forward: 1989. The UnitedStates attempts to remove ManuelNoriega from his post in Panama.
  42. 42. It was a serious effort. Theydeployed troops with significantweaponry, negotiators, and...
  43. 43. ...astonishingly loud heavy metal andtop-40 pop hits.This music was blared from tanks andpointed at the Vatican consulate, whereNoriega was in retreat.Noriega* surrendered in January 1990.* Loved opera. Couldn’t stand contemporary pop music.
  44. 44. Another popular favorite: Long Range AcousticDevices. Within 300 meters or less: big headache.100 meters or less: permanent auditory damage.Generally used against insurgents and protestors.
  45. 45. And now, for the good.
  46. 46. Music regularly plays a role increating cultural identity and inclusion.Mama Eu Quero!God Bless America!Fight for Your Right to Party!
  47. 47. Public transit.Seven years ago my friends at EliasArts built a suite of brand-basedsounds for France’s TGV. It served asa beacon for the brand but also as asuite of instructional cues.
  48. 48. (More) public transit:Julian Treasure and his firm The SoundAgency recently created a generativesoundscape for the Glasgow Airport.The goal: lower stress among travelers.Goal met; sales in airport shops alsowent up 10%.
  49. 49. Martyn Ware, Vince Clarke and their firm Sonic ID/IllustriousCompany designed the Sensory Theatre at the Bath, UKThreeways School for autistic and disabled children. 3Dsoundscapes, immersive visuals and adaptive environments.
  50. 50. GPS walkingtours for the blind
  51. 51. Some bad, some good.The truth? Sound is a tool for either.The grey areas are where this getsinteresting.
  52. 52. “The road train to hell is paved withthe best intentions.”In Tokyo, the main subway stations each have aunique musical signature that precedes the platformannouncements. One station in particular is infamousbecause it consistently has the highest number ofsuicides annually (e.g. people jumping in front ofincoming trains). A friend’s theory is that the music atthis station is largely to blame for the volume ofsuicides because it ends on an "unresolved” minornote. It’s the only station in the system that has thiskind of structure in its tone.
  53. 53. Is a healthy soundscapeavailable only to the wealthy?
  54. 54. Best Buy Movie Mode is an app we created for best Buy’s tie-inwith Despicable Me. The app translates the Minion-ese into Englishvia your cell phone.The secret sauce: working with the directors of the film, weembedded sonic codes into the soundtrack...which allows thephone to sync with the silver screen.
  55. 55. We worked with Old Navy to provideShazam-enabled links to coupons andshopping tools in real-time.
  56. 56. Mosquito quiz: raise your hand if youcan hear these tones...
  57. 57. What about Siri?
  58. 58. So why is this our opportunity?
  59. 59. Meet Mary Meeker. She does a lot offorecasting in her job as an analystKPCB. In late October she made abold announcement: the next big thingwould be...
  60. 60. We’re at the beginning ofsomething big.And it’s all making noise.
  61. 61. This feels a lot like 1997in San Francisco again.
  62. 62. Whose job is it to understand thenuances that are involved in designingcomplex interactive systems?Whose job is it to know how tomake sense out of a big hairy messand create something magical?
  63. 63. It’s not the visual designer’s job.It’s not the coder’s job. Or thestrategist’s, the account manager—or even the sound designer.They have jobs to do.
  64. 64. We’re user experience experts.It’s our obligation.
  65. 65. If we don’t take up this role—that of connecting the dots for thepeople who use the things we make—then someone else will.And it will probably be thewrong someone else.
  66. 66. Then the suits will get involved...
  67. 67. What can you do today?
  68. 68. 1. Start listening.
  69. 69. 2. Start questioning.
  70. 70. “I am a chord. You are a chord.”Let’s make some music.
  71. 71. Thank you. @nfranus nfranus@cpbgroup.com

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