Our Scottish Research Seminar talks

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Our highlights from our research in Scotland, how much do people trust charities and working on your charity brand

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  • Looking at trends over time, we see that trust in charities has been increasing steadily since 2007, from 42% to 70%. This is in line with research by the Charity Commission that finds public trust in charities is holding up, and that a growing proportion of the public think charities work for the public benefit (up from 64% to 68%) Trust in Scouts and Guides peaked in 2008, around the time of The Scout Association’s Kids Outdoors campaign and World Jamboree. By contrast, there has been no increase in trust in the Fundraising Standards Board, which achieves lower trust scores due to many respondents not recognising the name of the organisation. Given that the organisation was only launched in 2007, it is perhaps unsurprising that it has not yet become widely known and trusted. Interestingly however, membership of the Fundraising Standards Board has been identified by the public when prompted as likely to encourage trust in a particular charity.
  • Looking at public services, we see trust increased particularly during the banking crisis and seems to be falling slightly as the health of the UK economic starts to recover, suggesting these institutions may be particularly looked to during times of economic uncertainty as they offer stability and protection. The high levels of trust we see in the NHS here is matched by the high scores for the NHS when we ask about the top 2 most trusted organisations to provide a range of health services (see Appendix 1). It also matches with doctors being identified as the most trusted profession to tell the truth (92%), just ahead of teachers (88%), professors (80%) and judges (80%). (Sep 2009 face-to-face survey conducted by Ipsos MORI on behalf of the Royal College of Physicians).
  • This slide indicates that, despite a number of news stories with the potential to compromise trust in traditional institutions, the Armed Forces, Royal Family, Church and legal system have maintained levels of trust over the past 4 years, and appear to be rock solid in terms of trust.
  • In stark contrast to traditional institutions such as the Armed Forces and the Royal Family, trust in media and commercial organisations has proved prone to fluctuations. Trust in banks has unsurprisingly fallen since 2006, from 41% to just 19%, although the decrease hasn’t been completely linear, having seen a slight increase between July 2007 and July 2008 perhaps explained by the Government underwriting bank deposits in October 2007.
  • Looking at the range of institutions prompted, we find that charities are not alone in engendering more trust among women and under 45s than other groups- local authorities, banks, Government and insurance companies also have higher trust scores among this group. The Church and the Armed Forces are exceptions to this, being more trusted among over 45s. The Armed Forces are also more trusted by men than women.
  • When looking at regional demographics, we find that those in the Midlands and the East of England are most likely to have a great deal of trust in charities, while those in the North East, Yorkshire or Humberside are least likely to trust charities a great deal. However, when we combine scores for ‘a great deal’ and ‘quite a lot’, we find that regions in the South of Great Britain are less likely to be trust charities than those in the North West, Scotland and the East of England. This appears to be a similar regional pattern for certain other institutions, including the NHS, Civil Service, The Church and Government.
  • Asking the public to identify from a prompted list what is most likely to make them trust a particular charity, we find that following high standards in fundraising is the top reason identified as important for trust, selected by over half of the public among their top 5 reasons. However the top 5 spots are dominated by reasons relating to personal contact with a charity- either oneself or through a friend or family member, or through the charity being based locally. Endorsements by Government, a well-known company or a celebrity feature lower down the list, and advertising on television is selected by just 8% of the public. Although these may not be rationally identified as likely to lead to trust in a charity, they may still be having a strong effect subconscious.
  • Asking the public to identify from a prompted list what is most likely to make them trust a particular charity, we find that following high standards in fundraising is the top reason identified as important for trust, selected by over half of the public among their top 5 reasons. However the top 5 spots are dominated by reasons relating to personal contact with a charity- either oneself or through a friend or family member, or through the charity being based locally. Endorsements by Government, a well-known company or a celebrity feature lower down the list, and advertising on television is selected by just 8% of the public. Although these may not be rationally identified as likely to lead to trust in a charity, they may still be having a strong effect subconscious.
  • When we test out the impact personal connections to a charity might have on trust and look at whether parents are more likely to trust children’s charities, we find that they are more likely to trust all large children’s charities, but are not necessarily more likely to trust all charities, indicating that their personal connection to the cause may be having an impact.
  • Despite 44% of the public saying that being long-established is likely to make them trust a charity, when we look at trust levels against year of establishment, we find no particular increase in trust among those charities founded a long time ago.
  • However, having a high prompted awareness score has a small impact on trust levels, suggesting it not only matters whether the individual themselves has heard of the charity, but whether the charity is widely known.
  • Who: Based in london, but work throughout UK and it’s regions What: Provide organisations with the insights and information they need to understand their audiences How: Services include tracking stakeholder opinion and research support on issues of interest or concern such as stakeholder audits and client/user satisfaction studies.
  • Our vision
  • We run several tracking surveys that monitor attitudes and opinions of key stakeholder groups. This research is done for a syndicate of participating charities who share costs and data. The aim of our tracking studies is to provide lower cost, more frequent and more detailed research than an organisation could achieve by it’s own.
  • Our projects and consultancy work covers a wide range of studies. We specialise in stakeholders audits and in supporters and client/user satisfaction studies. We also have a strong record of work in the health and young people fields. We carry out focus groups, depth interviews which is either face-to-face or over the phone, we’ve conducted workshops as well as small and large scale desk research projects. Overall, we have surveyed over 100,000 people from the general public, supporters and staff. We are on a full member of the Market Research Society, on the COI list of approved qualitative and desk research agencies and on the British Council’s fundraising agency roster.
  • Finally, this is just to give an overview of what some of our clients have said about us. Our clients include: the Scout Association, Cancer Research UK, Macmillan Cancer Support, Save the Children, Oxfam, the British Council, Drinkaware to name a few. Any questions, please let me know. I will now pass you on to my colleague Richard to tell you a little bit more about our work in Scotland in particular our Scottish Engagement Charity Monitor.
  • In particular, post credit crunch we have seen an increase in the proportion of people who associate some of the core adjectives relating to the idea of Care/Support with their ideal charity blueprint; these increases have been maintained this wave. For example attributes such as ‘Supportive’ (50%) and ‘Sympathetic’ (28%) have seen their score increase from 33% and 17% in 2008 respectively.
  • The stability of attributes relating to charities’ trustworthiness highlights how core this trait remains for an ideal charity. However, looking at how other categories of attributes behave over time, some interesting trends emerge.
  • In line with rising importance of charities’ approach towards their service users, there are signs that certain aspects relating to the quality of service delivery have become more important over time. For example the proportion of people who indicate their ideal charity should be ‘Responsive’ went from 12% in the spring of 2008 to 18% this wave.
  • During the same period, the importance of charities’ approach towards their service users also appears to have increased, as suggested by individual attributes such as ‘Empowering’ (from 9% in spring 2008 to 14% this wave) and ‘Inclusive’ (from 6% in spring 2008 to 10% this wave).
  • As, following the credit crunch, the ideal charity blueprint has become more focused on aspects of care/support, approach towards service users and service delivery, we also observe a parallel decrease in importance of the more ‘outward facing’ traits of a charity brand. For instance, the decrease in importance of some key attributes feeding into charities’ credentials already observed between 2008 and 2009 continues this wave – e.g. ‘Effective/Cost effective’ (from 41% in 2008 to 31% in 2010) and ‘Accountable’ (from 49% in 2008 to 27% in 2010).
  • Since 2008 we have also observed a decline in attributes related to the idea of a charity making its voice heard. 31% of the public thought their ideal charity should be ‘Campaigning’ in 2008 compared to 22% in 2010, while 12% thought the ideal charity should be ‘Challenging’ compared to 7% in 2010. Again, when put in the context of the increasing importance of attributes relating to the area of care and support, this may be highlighting a desire for charity to turn more ‘inwards’ and focus on the beneficiaries’ needs during tough economic times when demand for charities’ services are higher than ever.
  • Finally, since 2008 more and more people indicate that the ideal charity should be ‘Inspiring’ (23% in 2010 compared to 16% in 2008) and ‘Visionary’ (8% in 2008 compared to 15% in 2010).
  • There are no significant changes over time with respect to the proportion of people who think an ideal charity should have the characteristics of a ‘public institution’ (e.g. ‘Established’, ‘Authoritative’, ‘Traditional’ etc).
  • A slightly lower proportion of people in 2010 indicate that they would like charities to be ‘Bold/Direct’ (4%) than in 2008 (8%) or ‘Ambitious’ (7% from 12% in 2008). Again, this is consistent with the increased importance of attributes relating to a more ‘inward looking’ approach.
  • There are also interesting differences by age. Interest in aspects of transparency (e.g. ‘Trustworthy’, ‘Honest’) as well as credentials (e.g. ‘effective/cost-effective’) increases with age. The institutional nature of a charity is also more likely to resonate as an ideal trait among older generations than younger ones.
  • By contrast, younger generations (18-24, 25-34 and 35-44 year olds) are more likely to associate attributes relating to charities’ ability to ‘speak out’ than older ones. Younger generations (18-34 year olds) are also more likely to expect their ideal charity to have attributes related to the ability to self-determine and being forward looking.
  • As already observed in previous waves, it is interesting to note that the greatest scope for improvement lies within attributes that the public considers important for the ideal charity blueprint. The gap between the ideal and actual average perception of charities is largest for attributes related to transparency which – as seen in previous slides – is one of the traits which is most important to the general public ,second only to the idea of care/support. While 63% of the public think their ideal charity should be trustworthy, on average only 30% of the public thinks that any of the charities prompted actually displays this trait; similarly, while 54% of the public think a charity should be honest, only 21% of the public on average thinks so in relation to specific charity brands. As already observed in other waves, credentials represent another potential area for improvement for charities, particularly in relation to cost-effectiveness and accountability.
  • As already observed in previous waves, it is interesting to note that the greatest scope for improvement lies within attributes that the public considers important for the ideal charity blueprint. The gap between the ideal and actual average perception of charities is largest for attributes related to transparency which – as seen in previous slides – is one of the traits which is most important to the general public ,second only to the idea of care/support. While 63% of the public think their ideal charity should be trustworthy, on average only 30% of the public thinks that any of the charities prompted actually displays this trait; similarly, while 54% of the public think a charity should be honest, only 21% of the public on average thinks so in relation to specific charity brands. As already observed in other waves, credentials represent another potential area for improvement for charities, particularly in relation to cost-effectiveness and accountability.
  • However, there are also a few areas in which charity brands are on average matching the ideal blueprint. This is particularly true in relation to charities being ‘Reputable’, ‘Modern’ and ‘Heroic’. The public’s expectations of a charity being ‘Practical’ also very closely match the average perception and the same is true for the expectations of a charity being ‘Challenging’. Where charities on average tend to incarnate certain attributes more than the public would expect them is in relation to their ‘institution-like’ nature (‘Established’, ‘Traditional’, ‘Conservative’). It is important to remember that a higher ‘average’ score than the ‘ideal’ one does not mean that in the eyes of the public, charities on the whole are faring not only well but exceptionally well in some areas. Rather, it means that charities exemplify a characteristic more than is preferred by the public.
  • However, there are also a few areas in which charity brands are on average matching the ideal blueprint. This is particularly true in relation to charities being ‘Reputable’, ‘Modern’ and ‘Heroic’. The public’s expectations of a charity being ‘Practical’ also very closely match the average perception and the same is true for the expectations of a charity being ‘Challenging’. Where charities on average tend to incarnate certain attributes more than the public would expect them is in relation to their ‘institution-like’ nature (‘Established’, ‘Traditional’, ‘Conservative’). It is important to remember that a higher ‘average’ score than the ‘ideal’ one does not mean that in the eyes of the public, charities on the whole are faring not only well but exceptionally well in some areas. Rather, it means that charities exemplify a characteristic more than is preferred by the public.
  • Our Scottish Research Seminar talks

    1. 1. Trust in charities July 2010 <ul><li>Tel: 020 7426 8865 </li></ul><ul><li>Email: jonathan.baker@nfpsynergy.net </li></ul><ul><li>Web: www.nfpsynergy.net </li></ul>
    2. 2. Key points <ul><li>Trust matters but it is not completely in your control </li></ul><ul><li>Some simple things affect trust in your charity </li></ul><ul><li>You can affect how trusted your charity is </li></ul>
    3. 3. Trust Matters
    4. 4. Trust in charities among other institutions
    5. 5. Since 2006 trust in charities has been on the rise….. “ Below is a list of public bodies and institutions. Please indicate, by ticking in the appropriate column, how much trust you have in each of the bodies” Base: 1003 adults 16+, Britain Source: Charity Awareness Monitor, Jan 10, nfpSynergy
    6. 6. … but trust in all public services increased during the recession “ Below is a list of public bodies and institutions. Please indicate, by ticking in the appropriate column, how much trust you have in each of the bodies” Base: 1003 adults 16+, Britain Source: Charity Awareness Monitor, Jan 10, nfpSynergy August 2007 Banking crisis starts with Northern Rock in the UK September 2008 Lehman Brothers files for bankruptcy January 2009 UK officially enters recession January 2010 UK returns to positive economic growth
    7. 7. Little change in trust for traditional institutions “ Below is a list of public bodies and institutions. Please indicate, by ticking in the appropriate column, how much trust you have in each of the bodies” Base: 1003 adults 16+, Britain Source: Charity Awareness Monitor, Jan 10, nfpSynergy
    8. 8. Some institutions have variable levels of trust “ Below is a list of public bodies and institutions. Please indicate, by ticking in the appropriate column, how much trust you have in each of the bodies” Base: 1003 adults 16+, Britain Source: Charity Awareness Monitor, Jan 10, nfpSynergy October 2008 Russell Brand and Jonathan Ross prank calls August 2007 Banking crisis starts with Northern Rock in the UK September 2008 Lehman Brothers files for bankruptcy
    9. 9. What type of charity do you represent? All charities have an element of stable institutions – they are trusted and it is difficult to lose trust Charities also have an added sense of being prone to loss of trust
    10. 10. Who trusts charities most?
    11. 11. Women and under 45s more trusting of most organisations “ Below is a list of public bodies and institutions. Please indicate, by ticking in the appropriate column, how much trust you have in each of the bodies” A great deal/ Quite a lot Base: 1003 adults 16+, Britain Source: Charity Awareness Monitor, Jan 10, nfpSynergy Women Men Under 45 Over 45 Banks The Armed Forces BBC Charities The Church Civil Service Government Insurance Companies Legal System Local Authorities NHS Which groups are more trusting?
    12. 12. Southerners tend to trust charities less “ Below is a list of public bodies and institutions. Please indicate, by ticking in the appropriate column, how much trust you have in each of the bodies” Charities Base: 1003 adults 16+, Britain Source: Charity Awareness Monitor, Jan 10, nfpSynergy
    13. 13. Reasons for trust in particular charities
    14. 14. High standards in fundraising tops the list of reason to trust a charity Base: 1,000 adults 16+, Britain. Source: Charity Awareness Monitor Jan 10, nfpSynergy “ What makes you likely to trust a particular charity? Please select up to 5 options.”
    15. 15. High standards in fundraising tops the list of reason to trust a charity Base: 1,000 adults 16+, Britain. Source: Charity Awareness Monitor Jan 10, nfpSynergy “ What makes you likely to trust a particular charity? Please select up to 5 options.”
    16. 16. What explains different levels of trust?
    17. 17. Parents more likely to trust children’s charities than those without children Base: All those who have heard of each organisation among 1,000 adults 16+, Britain. Source: Charity Awareness Monitor Jan 10, nfpSynergy “ Please tell me to what extent you trust each of these charities.” Quite a lot and A great deal scores
    18. 18. The longer you have been around the more you are trusted Base: All those who have heard of each organisation among 1,000 adults 16+, Britain. Source: Charity Awareness Monitor Jan 10, nfpSynergy “ Please tell me to what extent you trust each of these charities.” Ranked by Quite a lot and A great deal scores Trust Year Founded
    19. 19. The more people are aware of you the more they trust you Base: All those who have heard of each organisation among 1,000 adults 16+, Britain. Source: Charity Awareness Monitor Jan 10, nfpSynergy “ Please tell me to what extent you trust each of these charities.” Ranked by Quite a lot and A great deal scores Prompted awareness Trust
    20. 20. Charities with above trend trust <ul><li>Twice as likely to have a descriptive name e.g. Teenage Cancer Trust </li></ul><ul><li>More likely to represent clear cut universal causes e.g. cancer </li></ul>Charities with below trend trust <ul><li>More likely to have a ambiguous name e.g. Care International </li></ul><ul><li>Minority ailments, disabilities and mental health </li></ul>
    21. 21. How can you boost trust through communications <ul><li>Communicate – the more they know you the more they trust you. </li></ul><ul><li>Communicate clearly – the ‘does what it says on the tin’ rule. </li></ul><ul><li>Communicate simply – more can be less. ALL or SPECIAL are strong positions from which to create trust </li></ul>
    22. 22. <ul><li>Large charities – tend to be well known and trusted </li></ul>How can you boost trust – size of charity matters <ul><li>Small charities – need to be well known and trusted among their audience </li></ul><ul><li>Medium sized charities – too small to be widely known, too large for the personal effect </li></ul>
    23. 23. What are the challenges to trust in charities? <ul><li>The growth of charities – losing the underdog tag </li></ul><ul><li>Growing gap between perception and reality of charities and how they work </li></ul><ul><li>An impression of charities as efficient amateurs </li></ul>
    24. 24. Summary <ul><li>Personal experience, awareness and clarity about what a charity does affects trust </li></ul><ul><li>Trust in charities is strong and stronger in times of need </li></ul><ul><li>While we can’t control everything we can help make our charities trusted </li></ul>
    25. 25. Highlights of our work in Scotland Richard Ollerearnshaw and Christine Choe Telephone: (020) 7426 8865 email: jonathan.baker@nfpsynergy.net Web: www.nfpsynergy.net
    26. 26. Who are we? <ul><li>We are </li></ul><ul><li>a research consultancy dedicated to the not for profit sector </li></ul><ul><li>Our aim </li></ul><ul><li>to provide ideas , insights and information that help non-profits thrive </li></ul><ul><li>We do this by </li></ul><ul><li>syndicated tracking packages or tailored research solutions to help you find out what your key stakeholders think about you or the ideas you are working on </li></ul>
    27. 27. <ul><li>nfpSynergy wants to see </li></ul><ul><li>a world in which all  </li></ul><ul><li>non-profit organisations thrive </li></ul>
    28. 28. Attitudes and awareness tracking
    29. 29. Projects and consultancy Desk research Focus groups Depth interviews Workshops Surveys Online
    30. 30. “ I found working with nfpSynergy a pleasure and had complete confidence in them. Their analysis and subsequent presentation of the findings was particularly thorough. Our brief is a challenging one and using the insights from the research has been instrumental in helping us to develop our creative material which will help us to achieve our aim.” Remember a Charity “ I was incredibly impressed with the team in terms of their professionalism, skills and the quality of the final report they produced. The team were friendly and approachable and always took our comments on board in a timely and productive way. We felt in control of the project, while at the same time were able to put our trust in nfpSynergy at all times.” YouthNet A pleasure working with you.  Your guidance, counsel and hard work have helped us deliver a challenging but seminal project for Leonard Cheshire on very short timescales.  You have helped us move the organisation forward immensely. Thank you.
    31. 31. Are charities seen as Scottish, English or UK wide?
    32. 32. Base: 1,002 adults 16+, Scotland Source: SCEM October09, nfpSynergy Regarding the nationality of charities, do you view the following charities as Scottish, English, UK or other? Scottish Public view of the nationality of charities Selected charities
    33. 33. Scotland in a charity name leaves no doubt <ul><li>Unsurprisingly, having ‘Scotland’ or ‘Scottish’ in a charity name leaves no doubt in the public’s mind where the focus lies. </li></ul><ul><li>There is a sharp drop in perception of a charity as Scottish when they do not have Scotland explicitly in the title </li></ul><ul><li>Why does this matter?.. </li></ul>
    34. 35. Base: 1,000 adults 16+, Scotland Source: SCEM April 2010, nfpSynergy If you were to make a donation to a charity, which of these statements best describes how you would like the money to be spent? Strong desire for charitable donations to be spent at home in Scotland...
    35. 36. Particularly among readers of the Scottish press, supporters of independence, and SNP supporters Base: 1.000 adults 16+, Scotland Source: SCEM April10, nfpSynergy If you were to make a donation to a charity, which of these statements best describes how you would like the money to be spent?
    36. 37. ...particularly among older people Base: 1.000 adults 16+, Scotland Source: SCEM April10, nfpSynergy If you were to make a donation to a charity, which of these statements best describes how you would like the money to be spent?
    37. 38. The age effect applies even to legacy giving ‘Why might you choose to remember a charity in your will?’... Base: 1,000 adults 16+, Scotland Source: SCEM April10, nfpSynergy Here are some reasons why some people DO choose to remember a charity in their will. Whether you have left a legacy to a charity or not, please look at the list below and select up to 3 reasons that would be most likely to motivate you to leave a gift to a charity. Please select up to 3 answers
    38. 39. Emphasising Scottish spending may help to attract donors <ul><li>A majority of the Scottish public would like to see charitable donations being spent at home in Scotland </li></ul><ul><li>Charities emphasising their Scottish spending should benefit from this </li></ul><ul><li>Older people in particular are receptive to this message </li></ul><ul><li>(...as are readers of the Scottish press, supporters of Scottish independence and SNP supporters) </li></ul>
    39. 41. Public perception of charity spending on admin and fundraising – acceptable versus actual
    40. 42. Base: 1,002 adults 16+, Scotland Source: SCEM October09, nfpSynergy “ What would you estimate would be an acceptable percentage of the average charity’s income to be spent on fundraising and administration costs?”/ “What would you estimate is the actual percentage of an average charity’s income that goes on fundraising and administrations costs?” Public perception shifting on how much charities spend on admin and fundraising Actual amounts spent: Administration ≈ 12% Fundraising 12-25%
    41. 43. Base: 1,002 adults 16+, Scotland Source: SCEM October09, nfpSynergy “ What would you estimate would be an acceptable percentage of the average charity’s income to be spent on fundraising and administration costs?”/ “What would you estimate is the actual percentage of an average charity’s income that goes on fundraising and administrations costs?” Public perception shifting on how much charities spend on admin and fundraising Actual amounts spent: Administration ≈ 12% Fundraising 12-25%
    42. 44. The Scottish public do not realise quite how efficient charities are <ul><li>Spending money on fundraising is becoming increasingly acceptable to the public </li></ul><ul><li>Actual charity spending on admin and fundraising is below what the public find acceptable – but the public still do not know this </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasising efficiency in publications (e.g. ‘We spend no more than 10p in the pound on admin’) could improve public perceptions and potentially increase donations </li></ul>
    43. 45. Donating
    44. 46. Donating to charity recovers from Apr-09 low Base: 1,002 adults 16+, Scotland Source: SCEM October09, nfpSynergy “ Have you donated to any charity in the last 3 / 6 months?” September 2008 Lehman Brothers files for bankruptcy January 2009 UK officially enters recession
    45. 47. Donating to charity recovers from Apr-09 low <ul><li>April 09 showed the lowest proportion of the Scottish public donating since we started tracking in 2007 </li></ul><ul><li>For two waves in a row (Nov-08, Apr-09) numbers of people donating have been significantly lower largely due to economic circumstances and a dramatic loss of public confidence throughout 2008 and 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>This wave suggests that numbers of people donating has recovered somewhat but not returned to their 2007 peak </li></ul><ul><li>While the numbers donating may be recovering this information does not show the average amount donated </li></ul><ul><li>It is reassuring to see donors returning as confidence in the economy recovers </li></ul>
    46. 48. Donating to charity – by gender and social grade Base: 1,002 adults 16+, Scotland Source: SCEM October09, nfpSynergy “ Have you donated to any charity in the last 3 / 6 months?”
    47. 49. Money and lifestage Source: BHPS / The Future Foundation age 16-19 with parents, no job age 20-23 first job, living with parents age 24-26 working, living alone age 27-30 living with partner, first mortgage age 30-32 first child, women exits work age 33-35 second child age 36-42 woman in p/t work, moves to larger house age 43-47 woman in full time work age 48-52 children reach adulthood age 53-56 children leave home age 57-60 early retirement for many, home owned outright age 61-65 all women retired, most men retired age 66-75 both partners retired age 75+ widowed, single person household
    48. 50. Donating to charity - by age Base: 1,002 adults 16+, Scotland Source: SCEM October09, nfpSynergy “ Have you donated to any charity in the last 3 / 6 months?”
    49. 51. Donations and recession <ul><li>Unsurprisingly, during an economic crisis, the numbers of people donating have been significantly lower </li></ul><ul><li>More recent data suggests that numbers of people donating has recovered somewhat but not returned to pre-recession levels </li></ul><ul><li>Giving levels have more or less recovered among 16-30s and 55-64 year-olds </li></ul><ul><li>35- 54 year olds have yet to return to pre recession donating numbers </li></ul><ul><li>Confidence is still low in Scotland and the most recent data suggests that potential donors are still waiting to see whether the economy will continue its recovery or enter a double-dip recession </li></ul>
    50. 52. Spontaneous recall of charity campaigns Top 9 campaigns recalled by MSPs Do you recall any specific campaigns, media coverage, or advertising carried out by charities, voluntary organisations or pressure groups, over the last 6 months? Base: 50 MSPs, Nov09 Source: Survey of Scottish Parliament, nfpSynergy
    51. 53. Charities directly impressing MSPs in the last 6 months Top 11 charities Which charities have directly impressed you in the last 6 months in your role as an MSP? Base: 50 MSPs, Nov09 Source: Survey of Scottish Parliament, nfpSynergy
    52. 54. 4 1 - A charity’s impact on MSPs has to do with a lot more than size
    53. 55. What does your charity brand say about you, and how can you strengthen it? Jonathan Baker July 2010 <ul><li>Tel: 020 7426 8888 </li></ul><ul><li>Email: jonathan.baker@nfpsynergy.net </li></ul><ul><li>Web: www.nfpsynergy.net </li></ul>
    54. 56. 10 Steps towards creating a strong charity brand The complexity of the ideal charity brand How demographics affect the ideal charity brand Mind the Gap: where charities are missing the ideal
    55. 57. How demographics affect the ideal charity brand Mind the Gap: where charities are missing the ideal 10 steps towards creating a strong charity brand The complexity of the ideal charity brand
    56. 58. Ideal attributes ‘ Care and support ’ Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, April 2010 “ Listed below are a number of words that could be used to describe a charity or not for profit organisation. Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity…”
    57. 59. Ideal attributes ‘ Transparency’ Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, April 2010 “ Listed below are a number of words that could be used to describe a charity or not for profit organisation. Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity…”
    58. 60. Ideal attributes ‘ Service delivery’ Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, April 2010 “ Listed below are a number of words that could be used to describe a charity or not for profit organisation. Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity…”
    59. 61. Ideal attributes ‘ Service users’ Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, April 2010 “ Listed below are a number of words that could be used to describe a charity or not for profit organisation. Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity…”
    60. 62. Ideal attributes ‘ Credentials’ Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, April 2010 “ Listed below are a number of words that could be used to describe a charity or not for profit organisation. Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity…”
    61. 63. Ideal attributes ‘ Speaking out’ Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, April 2010 “ Listed below are a number of words that could be used to describe a charity or not for profit organisation. Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity…”
    62. 64. Ideal attributes ‘ Forward looking’ Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, April 2010 “ Listed below are a number of words that could be used to describe a charity or not for profit organisation. Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity…”
    63. 65. Ideal attributes ‘ Institutional’ Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, April 2010 “ Listed below are a number of words that could be used to describe a charity or not for profit organisation. Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity…”
    64. 66. Ideal attributes ‘ Self-determined’ Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, April 2010 “ Listed below are a number of words that could be used to describe a charity or not for profit organisation. Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity…”
    65. 67. How demographics affect the ideal charity brand Mind the Gap: where charities are missing the ideal 10 steps towards creating a strong charity brand The complexity of the ideal charity brand
    66. 68. Women are more likely to see ideal charities as focused on users and service delivery while …. … .Men are more likely to see ideal charities as self-determined and institutions
    67. 69. Focus on credentials, transparency, institution and service delivery increases with age Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, Apr 2010 “ Listed below are a number of words that could be used to describe a charity or not for profit organisation. Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity…”
    68. 70. Younger generations are more likely to expect ideal charities to be loud, forward looking and self-determined Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, Apr 2010 “ Listed below are a number of words that could be used to describe a charity or not for profit organisation. Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity…”
    69. 71. How demographics affect the ideal charity brand Mind the Gap: where charities are missing the ideal 10 steps towards creating a strong charity brand The complexity of the ideal charity brand
    70. 72. Ideal v. Average Attributes
    71. 73. The attributes gap: Attributes with potential for improvement “ Listed below are a number of words that could be used to describe a charity or not for profit organisation. Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity…” Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, April 2010
    72. 74. The attributes gap: Attributes with potential for improvement “ Listed below are a number of words that could be used to describe a charity or not for profit organisation. Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity…” Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, April 2010
    73. 75. The attributes gap: Positive attributes that the average charity is matching “ Listed below are a number of words that could be used to describe a charity or not for profit organisation. Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity…” Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, April 2010
    74. 76. The attributes gap Less positive attributes that the average charity is matching “ Listed below are a number of words that could be used to describe a charity or not for profit organisation. Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity…” Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, April 2010
    75. 77. How demographics affect the ideal charity brand Mind the Gap: where charities are missing the ideal 10 steps towards creating a strong charity brand The complexity of the ideal charity brand
    76. 78. 10 steps to creating a strong charity brand <ul><ul><li>Step 1: Realise branding matters </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Step 2: Realise branding is more than just a logo </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Step 3: Start with the beating heart of your organisations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Step 4: Create an essence statement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Step 5: Have an inspiring vision </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Step 6: Be clear about your route to delivering your mission </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Step 7: Know what you believe in and say it strongly </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Step 8: Understand what you want your brand strategy to do </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Step 9: Manage your image actively and with commitment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Step 10: Be in it for the long haul </li></ul></ul>
    77. 79. Two integral parts of the brand: Visual and values Visual elements Name Logo House style Colours Messages Values elements Vision Core values Mission Adjectives Purpose
    78. 80. The brand iceberg Vision Core values Mission Adjectives Purpose Name Logo House style Co l ours Messages What gets seen/heard The foundations of what gets seen or heard
    79. 81. People don’t: <ul><li>Give because you have a great logo </li></ul><ul><li>Use your services because of your fantastic corporate colours </li></ul><ul><li>Run your media stories because of your amazing strapline </li></ul><ul><li>Get your leaflets because your house style is so consistent </li></ul>
    80. 82. The slow drift apart of an organisation’s image services public fundraising
    81. 83. The goal: The purpose of a brand strategy is to maximize the overlap between the circles or bring them into focus for the first time services public fundraising
    82. 84. Hot tips for success <ul><li>Clarity and simplicity at the centre </li></ul><ul><li>Senior champion visibly involved </li></ul><ul><li>Be ruthless about audiences </li></ul><ul><li>Be clear what you are not </li></ul><ul><li>Everything communicates </li></ul><ul><li>Consistency over years </li></ul><ul><li>Consistency between internal and external </li></ul>
    83. 85. Key points from today <ul><li>Trust can be built through a clear brand and message </li></ul><ul><li>People do not always know who you are and what you do </li></ul><ul><li>Strong brands recognise what people want and show the beating heart of a charity </li></ul>
    84. 86. Links from talks <ul><li>Research products that informed our talks: </li></ul><ul><li>Charity Awareness Monitor (UK general public) http://nfpsynergy.net/tracking_research/charity_awareness_monitor/default.aspx </li></ul><ul><li>Scottish Charity Engagement Monitor (Scottish general public) http://nfpsynergy.net/tracking_research/scottish_charity_engagement_monitor/default.aspx </li></ul><ul><li>Celtic Monitor (Devolved bodies including MSPs) http://nfpsynergy.net/tracking_research/celtic_parliamentary_monitor/default.aspx </li></ul><ul><li>Brand attributes (UK general public on brand) http://nfpsynergy.net/tracking_research/brand_attributes_monitor/default.aspx </li></ul><ul><li>Links to our free research and reports: </li></ul><ul><li>Building a strong charity brand: http://nfpsynergy.net/includes/documents/cm_docs/2008/a/1_a_strong_charity_brand_comes_from_strong_beliefs_and_values.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>Getting a simple message across http://nfpsynergy.net/includes/documents/cm_docs/2008/o/oct06_getting_the_message_across_final.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>Case studies in branding http://nfpsynergy.net/includes/documents/cm_docs/2008/n/nfpsynergy_jewellers_story_july_2005.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>Links to our press releases in Scotland: </li></ul><ul><li>Scottish donations for Scotland http://nfpsynergy.net/mdia_coverage/our_press_releases/scottish_donations_for_scottish_beneficiaries_2.aspx </li></ul><ul><li>Scottish levels of donating (2009) http://nfpsynergy.net/mdia_coverage/our_press_releases/nfpsynergy_press_release_july_09_number_of_scots_giving_to_charity_down_8_percentage_points_yearonyear.aspx </li></ul>
    85. 87. Appendix
    86. 88. Top 20 ideal charity attributes Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, April 2010 “ Listed below are a number of words that could be used to describe a charity or not for profit organisation. Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity…”
    87. 89. Next 16 ideal charity attributes Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, April 2010 “ Listed below are a number of words that could be used to describe a charity or not for profit organisation. Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity…” Ambitious 7% Challenging 7% Authoritative 5% Outspoken 5% Bold / Direct 4% Heroic 4% Traditional 4% Cautious 2% Conservative 1% Exclusive 1% Greedy/Rich 1% Boring 0%
    88. 90. Top 10 Ideal attributes for charities working in Child Welfare Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, April 2010 “ Listed below are a number of words that could be used to describe a charity or not for profit organisation. Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity…”
    89. 91. Top 10 Ideal attributes for Youth Organisations Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, Apr 2010 “ Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity working in…. ”
    90. 92. Top 10 Ideal attributes for charities working in Disability and Sensory Impairment Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, Apr 2010 “ Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity working in…. ”
    91. 93. Top 10 Ideal attributes for charities working in Health Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, Apr 2010 “ Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity working in…. ”
    92. 94. Top 10 Ideal attributes for charities working in Environment and Conservation Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, Apr 2010 “ Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity working in…”
    93. 95. Top 10 Ideal attributes for charities working in Social Welfare Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, Apr 2010 “ Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity working in…”
    94. 96. Top 10 Ideal attributes for charities working in International Aid and Development Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, Apr 2010 “ Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity working in…”
    95. 97. Top 10 Ideal attributes for charities working in Housing and Homelessness Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, Apr 2010 “ Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity working in…”
    96. 98. Top 10 Ideal attributes for charities working in Advice and Information Services Source: Brand Attributes, nfpSynergy Base: 2,008 adults 16+, Britain, Apr 2010 “ Please choose up to 10 words that you think describe your IDEAL charity working in…”
    97. 99. 2-6 Tenter Ground Spitalfields London E1 7NH (w) www.nfpsynergy.net (t) 020 7426 8888 (e) insight@nfpsynergy.net Registered office: 2-6 Tenter Ground Spitalfields London E1 7NH Registered in England No. 04387900 VAT Registration 839 8186 72

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