nexB - FOSS Introduction

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Introduction to Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) License by nexB.
You can see a list of most popular FOSS license in DejaCode, visit us at https://enterprise.dejacode.com/landing/

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nexB - FOSS Introduction

  1. 1. Introduction to Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) Licenses © 2013 nexB Inc.
  2. 2. © 2013 nexB Inc. Introduction to FOSS Licenses Agenda •  Software License Definitions •  Software License Issues •  About nexB
  3. 3. © 2013 nexB Inc. Introduction to FOSS Licenses Definitions – FOSS Licenses •  FOSS = Free and Open Source Software –  aka FLOSS = Free/Libre Open Source Software •  Free means you have the right to study, use, change and redistribute the software •  Open Source means you have access to the source code –  Open Source also refers to a collaborative software development approach •  Examples of common FOSS licenses are: BSD, GPL, LGPL, MIT and MPL
  4. 4. © 2013 nexB Inc. Introduction to FOSS Licenses Free Software licenses source code available source with limitations (Proprietary) Copyleft FOSS Attribution Binary-only (Proprietary) Free Software Freeware / Shareware many Java libraries Microsoft shared source Sun SCSL GNU GPL GNU LGPL MPL CDDL BSD MIT ApacheEPL Adobe Reader
  5. 5. © 2013 nexB Inc. Introduction to FOSS Licenses Definitions - Free Proprietary Licenses •  Free Proprietary software is very important in many domains especially Java: –  The software is free for your own use AND –  You may be able to redistribute the software, BUT –  You cannot change it AND there may be other restrictions •  Some examples of free proprietary licenses: –  (Oracle)Sun Binary Code Licenses (esp. for JDK/JRE) –  Adobe Reader EULA and similar –  Oracle Technology Network Development and Distribution License Terms
  6. 6. © 2013 nexB Inc. Introduction to FOSS Licenses FOSS License Obligations Attribution Obligations are typically a combination of: •  Keeping license and copyright notices in the source code in the source file headers or in separate text files. •  Acknowledging the use of the software, the license and/or the copyright in documentation or a product (e.g. Help) Redistribution Obligations are typically a combination of: •  Making source code available for the original work, and •  For your changes (derivative works) – •  Possibly Including some of your proprietary code.
  7. 7. © 2013 nexB Inc. Introduction to FOSS Licenses FOSS – Permissive / Attribution Licenses Licenses with Attribution obligations only •  Apache 1.1 and 2.0 •  BSD – Original, Modified and Simplified •  MIT / X11 •  Creative Commons Attribution •  OpenSSL-SSLeay •  W3C •  Zlib and, of course, Beerware
  8. 8. © 2013 nexB Inc. Introduction to FOSS Licenses FOSS – Copyleft Licenses Copyleft licenses have Attribution and Redistribution obligations •  Copyleft Licenses (“strong”) –  GNU General Public License (GPL) –  Affero GPL •  Limited Copyleft Licenses (“weak”) –  GNU Lesser (or Library) General Public License (LGPL) –  Artistic License –  Common Development and Distribution License (CDDL) –  Common Public License (CPL) –  Eclipse Public License (EPL) –  Mozilla Public License (MPL)
  9. 9. © 2013 nexB Inc. Introduction to FOSS Licenses FOSS License Violation Risks •  “Copyleft” licenses require you to redistribute source code and may force you to release proprietary software as open source or rewrite your software to avoid that obligation •  Some FOSS activists (e.g. Busybox) are raising litigation stakes to “encourage” compliance with GPL •  Even “business-friendly” licenses (Apache, etc.) require you to identify and protect copyright owner rights and may impact your patent portfolio •  Negative reaction from OSS community may impair your brand
  10. 10. © 2013 nexB Inc. Introduction to FOSS Licenses Proprietary License Violation Risks •  Violation of a free proprietary software license may require you to acquire a commercial license and/or change your code: –  Most prominent example is misuse of Sun JDK/JRE in violation of the field-of-use restrictions (general purpose computer only) –  Oracle is aggressively looking for revenue from the Java products it acquired –  Including compensation for violations in the past •  Violation of a commercial software license may expose you to significant financial penalties and/or litigation
  11. 11. © 2013 nexB Inc. Introduction to FOSS Licenses About nexB •  Our mission is to enable a robust software component- based supply chain •  Our current focus is: –  Analysing software provenance (origin and license) and –  Providing a complete software inventory/BOM –  DejaCode Enterprise, a product suite that helps you better manage open source, third-party, and original components throughout the software development lifecycle •  Expertise in software IP analysis across all languages and environments •  Software audit services for acquisitions, software products and internal (IT) systems •  Active open source developers - lead committers and contributors to public projects
  12. 12. © 2013 nexB Inc. Introduction to FOSS Licenses Contact us Contact person: Pierre Lapointe, Customer Care Manager plapointe@nexb.com + 1 415 287-7643 More information: http://www.nexb.com http://www.dejacode.com/

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