Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Chapter Two: Working with Major Modes
    •    Prerequisites:
            o Pentatonic Scale, Blues Scale
            o Re...
About Major Modes 
We are going to begin our study with an examination and application of Major Modes to the blues.  Each ...
Figure 2.1 – Modes of the C Major Scale 
 




 


      3  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | The Thunder In You (v9) ...
This method can be applied to every major scale.  Twelve (12) major scales multiplied by seven (7) 
modes = 84 modes; each...
 




    Figure 2.2 – Modes For The Blues (Full Octave Scales)   
 

 
 




      5  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes...
Practice Tips 
 

    1. Learn each blues exercise slowly (quarter note = 120).   

    2. Play each blues exercise three ...
WRITTEN EXERCISES 
    1.) What are the modes that can be derived from these major scales? 
           a. Bb major 
      ...
PLAYING EXERCISES 




 

 Instructions: Play this exercise with quarter note = 120. Practice this in Bb
  

only (at firs...
 

Instructions: Play this exercise with quarter note = 120. Practice this in Bb only
(at first), using traditional jazz e...
 
 




    10  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | The Thunder In You (v9) 
 
 




    11  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | The Thunder In You (v9) 
 
 


Insert: Unison Relationships vs.  Diatonic  Relationships 
 

At the foundation of jazz harmony are the study of chord...
 
   2.) Diatonic Relationships ‐ chords and scales are derived from the notes diatonic to that chord’s 
       root  or s...
Insert 1 ­  Major Modes Unison Relationships – C Major Example




    14  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | The Thund...
 

Insert.2 ­  Major Modes Diatonic Relationships – C Major Example 
 




    15  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | T...
 




    16  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | The Thunder In You (v9) 
 
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Chapter two(was 1) v9-oldformat

475 views

Published on

save

  • Be the first to comment

Chapter two(was 1) v9-oldformat

  1. 1. Chapter Two: Working with Major Modes • Prerequisites: o Pentatonic Scale, Blues Scale o Review of Canvas Approach o Review of 12 bar Blues Structure • Scales and Modes:                                                   • Tools for Practice: o Metronome o Chromatic Tuner 1  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | The Thunder In You (v9)   
  2. 2. About Major Modes  We are going to begin our study with an examination and application of Major Modes to the blues.  Each  mode is created by starting on a different note of the major scale; by starting on a different note, a new  mode is created.  Each of these scales/modes can then be applied to [corresponding] chord types.   There are seven modes that can be derived from a major scale.  They are:  • Ionian   ‐ MA7  • Dorian  ‐ ‐7  • Phyrigian  ‐ ‐7(b13, b9)  • Lydian  ‐ MA7(#11)  • Mixolydian  ‐ 7  • Aolean – ‐7(b13)  • Locrian – ‐7(b13,b9,b5)  For example,  C major yields seven (7) different modes.    • C‐Ionian   ‐ MA7  • D ‐ Dorian  ‐ ‐7  • E ‐ Phyrigian  ‐ ‐7(b13, b9)  • F ‐ Lydian  ‐ MA7(#11)  • G ‐ Mixolydian  ‐ 7  • A ‐ Aolean – ‐7(b13)  • B ‐ Locrian – ‐7(b13,b9,b5)                      2  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | The Thunder In You (v9)   
  3. 3. Figure 2.1 – Modes of the C Major Scale      3  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | The Thunder In You (v9)   
  4. 4. This method can be applied to every major scale.  Twelve (12) major scales multiplied by seven (7)  modes = 84 modes; each with its own tone color and function.         Practice Tips    1. Learn each scale slowly (quarter note = 120).  Start in one key, then after getting solid  there, move on to another key.  2. Play all scales around the circle of 4ths and chromatically in ½ steps.  3. Allow the sound of each scale to permeate your mind.  Let each scale ‘get inside your  head’.      Major Modes Applied to Blues Progressions  Applying major modes within the blues can give the improviser a solid base from which to create  different melodies,  shapes, and patterns while maintaining consonance with each chord.   This is the  basis for ‘chord/scale theory’ – a practice in which each chord has a corresponding scale or mode.    A ‘standard’ twelve (12) bar blues presents a great opportunity for the improviser to use major modes.   Each bar of the blues has its own tone color.  In this example, we apply a major mode to each measure  of the ‘standard’ 12 bar blues.  The notes will be [diatonic] to each chord/scale relationship.  Another  approach would be to [match] each chord with a major mode.   Here’s an example:  • Bb7 = Bb mixolydian  • Eb7 = Eb mixolydian  • Bb7 = Bb mixolydian  • F‐7 – Bb7 = F dorian – Bb7 mixolydian  • Eb7 = Eb mixolydian  • E o (diminished)  = E diminished (not a major mode)  • Bb7 = Bb mixolydian  • D07(half‐diminished) – G13 (#11, #9, b9) = D locrian, G phrygian (not a major mode)  • C‐7 = C dorian  • F7  = F mixolydian  • D‐7 – G7 = D dorian, G mixolydian  • C‐7 – F7  = C dorian, F mixolydian  4  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | The Thunder In You (v9)   
  5. 5.   Figure 2.2 – Modes For The Blues (Full Octave Scales)          5  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | The Thunder In You (v9)   
  6. 6. Practice Tips    1. Learn each blues exercise slowly (quarter note = 120).    2. Play each blues exercise three different ways; ascending, descending, and alternating.  Get  secure in ascending, then move on to the other two patterns.  3. Add tip # 3 here.      SUMMARY  In contemporary music chords and scale types are closely related; each chord type can be associated  with some kind of scale.   In this chapter you’ve learned that seven (7) different modes, each with its  own [tonality] can be derived from a single major scale.  These modes can be applied to different chord  types and used as foundation for the creation of melodies for improvisation.    Using the blues is a great way to get used to associating different chord types with different types of  scales.  The ‘standard’ 12 bar blues contains ample opportunity for an improviser to apply mixolydian,  dorian, and locrian modes.  These associations are diatonic to the [tonality].    6  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | The Thunder In You (v9)   
  7. 7. WRITTEN EXERCISES  1.) What are the modes that can be derived from these major scales?  a. Bb major  b. E major  c. A major  d. Ab major  2.) Match the appropriate scale with each chord:  a. BbMA7  b. Eb7  c. D‐7  d. C‐7  e. F7  3.) Match the appropriate scale with each chord:  a. BbMA7  b. Eb7  c. D‐7  d. C‐7  e. F7  4.) Match the appropriate scale with each chord:  a. BbMA7  b. Eb7  c. D‐7  d. C‐7  e. F7  5.) Match the appropriate scale with each chord:  a. BbMA7  b. Eb7  c. D‐7  d. C‐7  e. F7  6.) Match the appropriate scale with each chord:  a. BbMA7  b. Eb7  c. D‐7  d. C‐7  e. F7    7  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | The Thunder In You (v9)   
  8. 8. PLAYING EXERCISES    Instructions: Play this exercise with quarter note = 120. Practice this in Bb    only (at first), using traditional jazz emphasis (swung 8th notes, with typical accenting). Once comfortable with this ascending pattern, also play the exercise descending (reverse the pattern and play it backwards), then alternating (ascending in one measure, then descending the next measure). Be sure to memorize this exercise so that you can do it anywhere at anytime. 8  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | The Thunder In You (v9)   
  9. 9.   Instructions: Play this exercise with quarter note = 120. Practice this in Bb only (at first), using traditional jazz emphasis (swung 8th notes, with typical accenting). Once comfortable with this ascending pattern, also play the exercise descending (reverse the pattern and play it backwards), then alternating (ascending in one measure, then descending the next measure). Be sure to memorize this exercise so that you can do it anywhere at anytime.   9  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | The Thunder In You (v9)   
  10. 10.     10  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | The Thunder In You (v9)   
  11. 11.   11  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | The Thunder In You (v9)   
  12. 12.   Insert: Unison Relationships vs.  Diatonic  Relationships    At the foundation of jazz harmony are the study of chords and scales.   For the student, this approach is  generally handled in one of two ways.    1.) “Unison” Relationships – chords and scales are compared to each other from the root (usually  starting with the major key).  For example – C major    Major  C   D  E  F  G  A  B  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  Dorian  C   D  Eb  F  G  A  Bb  1  2  b3  4  5  b6 (b13)  b7  Phryrigian  C   Db  Eb  F  G  Ab  Bb  1  2  b3  4  5   b6  b7  Lydian  C   D  E  F#  G  A  B  1  2  3  4 (#11)  5  6  7  Mixolydian  C   D  E  F  G  A  Bb  1  2  3  4  5  6  b7  Aolean  C   D  Eb  F  G  Ab  Bb  1  2  b3  4  5  b6 (b13)  b7  Locrian  C   Db  Eb  F  Gb  Ab  Bb  1  2  b3  4  b5  b6 (b13)  b7      12  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | The Thunder In You (v9)   
  13. 13.   2.) Diatonic Relationships ‐ chords and scales are derived from the notes diatonic to that chord’s  root  or scale’s root.  For example – C Major:    Major  C   D  E  F  G  A  B  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  Dorian  D  E  F  G  A  B  C  2  3  4  5  6  7  1  Phryrigian  E  F  G  A  B  C  D  3  4  5  6  7  1  2  Lydian  F  G  A  B  C  D  E  4  5  6  7  1  2  3  Mixolydian  G  A  B  C  D  E  F  5  6  7  1  2  3  4  Aolean  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  6  7  1  2  3  4  5  Locrian  B  C  D  E  F  G  A  7  1  2  3  4  5  6    In this text, we’ll use both approaches ‐ showing you the methods to use to create chords and scales  from diatonic and parallel relationships found in each chord and scale.   Both methods are important for  your development as an improviser.  Unison relationships provide a way to identify scales and chords  compared to each other (via the root),while diatonic relationships provide a means for the performer to  create different tonalities diatonic to the chord and scale.          13  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | The Thunder In You (v9)   
  14. 14. Insert 1 ­  Major Modes Unison Relationships – C Major Example 14  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | The Thunder In You (v9)   
  15. 15.   Insert.2 ­  Major Modes Diatonic Relationships – C Major Example    15  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | The Thunder In You (v9)   
  16. 16.   16  Chapter 2: Working with Major Modes | The Thunder In You (v9)   

×