Love Cycling – Go Dutch!
Lynn Sloman
01654 781358
lynn@transportforqualityoflife.com
www.transportforqualityoflife.com
Aim to increase cycling by 73% in two years - an extra 1.2
million cycling trips
Get Britain Cycling
recommendations
• Cycling budget of at least £10
per person per year, rising to
£20
• Local and nation...
Three Questions
• Is it really possible to create a culture of cycling in a
city that doesn’t already have it?....the stor...
Seville
4th largest city in Spain (700,000 population)
Big roads…but also big traffic congestion
‘Too hot’ to be natural c...
In six years:
Cycling
increased from
0.2% to 6.6% of
all trips
(and from 2,500
to 66,000
cyclists per day)

>2000% increas...
Not just bike lanes…
• Bike hire scheme: 2500
bicycles at 250 pick-up
points
• Free use of 200 folding
bikes for universit...
Women now
make up
50% of
cyclists (up
from 20%)
How much did it cost?
•
•
•
•

€30 million
140 km network
4 years
700,000 population

= €11 per citizen per year
Cycling Demonstration Towns
% change in automatic cycle counts (2005 = 100%)
160
Darlington

150
Exeter
Brighton and Hove
...
Average annual change in average count per counter

6 CDTs and 12 CCTs
30

20

10

0
0

100

200

300

400

500

600

Aver...
What was the secret ingredient of their
success?
For the recipe to work at all, there are
several vital ingredients that must act
together…
Why is this?
Different ingredients added
together can tackle all the
different things that stop
someone changing to
cyclin...
What stops people cycling?
(Potential) cyclist
Habit: ‘I always drive’

Social norms: ‘All my friends
drive’
Knowledge gap...
‘No safe quiet route for the journey I make’

SOLUTION: High quality continuous ‘signature’
routes for all main radial cor...
‘The cycle route gives out and ‘dumps me’
just when I need it most’

SOLUTION: Advanced stop lines and cycle
crossings at ...
‘There’s nowhere secure to park at my
destination’

SOLUTION: Cycle parking at key destinations
including employers and sh...
‘I don’t own a bike!’

SOLUTION: Bike loan scheme so you can
‘try before you buy’
‘I don’t know where the cycle routes go!’

SOLUTION: Widely distributed cycle maps +
comprehensive cycle route signage
‘I never see anybody else on a bike!’

SOLUTION: Cycling Festival – suddenly,
it seems like everyone is on their bike
‘I always get to work by car…it’s too much
trouble to change’

SOLUTION: Workplace Cycle Challenge –
encourage everyone to...
So what have the Cycling Cities and Towns
done?
New cyclist
Break habit: Give a reason
to try something new
Change the soc...
“What we’ve done goes well
beyond more cycle tracks and
has become a tool to transform
the city. There has been an
extraor...
Lynn Sloman 05 11 13
Lynn Sloman 05 11 13
Lynn Sloman 05 11 13
Lynn Sloman 05 11 13
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Lynn Sloman, Transport for Quality of Life

Love Cycling Go Dutch Conference
Newcastle, 5 November 2013

Keynote address

Published in: Education, Sports, Business
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  • Excellent that Newcastle has secured £6 million for cycling from your Cycle City Ambition bid to DfT.A great achievement, and a terrific bid.Because of my LSTF expert panel role, I read a lot of local authority bids to DfT for funding, and this one definitely has the wow factor. The vision that you have for cycling in Newcastle is imaginative; I love that simple diagram that shows the cycle network that you are going to create, and which bits of it you’ll be able to achieve in the next two years. I think your aim to increase cycling by an extra 1.2 million trips, or 73%, in two years, is hugely ambitious and exciting.
  • The scale of your ambition is in line with the recommendations from the recent report of the All Party Parliamentary Cycling Group.
  • Seville:fourth largest city in Spain, population of 700,000. by 1990s, with a growing economy, there had been huge increases in car ownershipdespite some big roads, with a lot of space dedicated to cars, traffic congestion had become a major issue. Four rush hours per day, because of workers returning home for the traditional 2pm to 5pm siestagrowing pressure for something to be done.Cycling wasn’t seen as the natural solution to this. Mediterranean cities are unlike Dutch cities, in that there isn’t – or wasn’t – a cycling culture. And Seville is right in the south of the country; very high summer temperatures, so many people saw it as too hot a city for cycling to be attractive.
  • But in 2005, the city administration made a decision to go for it. They asked a small specialist consultancy called Estudio MC, led not by a traffic engineer but by a biologist, Manuel Calvo, to draw up a bicycle master plan, and to design more than 78km of dedicated cycle routes.Initially, Manuel and his colleagues proposed that the network should be built in two stages of 40km each, over a period of 8 years. But the city’s Head of Urban Planning and Housing vetoed those proposals, and told Manuel that he wanted the entire 80km built in a single stage, within two years. That was because the city administration was all too aware that it had to produce results within its four-year electoral term.
  • At the same time as opening the cycle network, the city introduced a bike-hire scheme, with 2500 bicycles available from 250 pick-up points around the city. That was hugely popular, with about a third of all bicycle trips in the city using the hire-bikes in 2010.The university offers free use of 200 folding bicycles to students and staff. The city centre bus station also introduced a free bike scheme for its passengers, with 250 bicycles available for bus passengers coming into the city centre to use to complete their journey.
  • What we all know Seville for is its oranges. Most of the main thoroughfares in the city are lined with orange trees. Those trees have a special interest for us, because they show the line where the edge of the carriageway used to be. As you can see here, what has happened is that road-space has been taken away from cars, and used to provide a 2.5 m cycle path. And that cycle path is itself segregated from the busy main road traffic….
  • …in some cases by a paved area which may be used for cycle hire points…
  • ..in other cases, by a small kerb and line of bollards.The overall result is that cycling feels extremely safeIt is very visible to everyone, including motoristsAnd as you cycle around Seville, you see lots of older people, young people and women on bikes. Cycling isn’t just the preserve of young men in lycra. The percentage of female cyclists has gone up from 20% to 50%. In fact, Seville feels almost like a Dutch or Northern European city – apart from the sunshine.
  • So the crucial question, back here in Britain, is could we do the same here?In 2005, Cycling England decided that we wanted to find out. We funded six medium-sized towns, each at roughly £5 per head of population per year, with matched funding bringing the total up to £10 per head per year.The six towns were Darlington, Exeter, Brighton, Lancaster, Derby and Aylesbury.This graph shows what happened to cycling levels in the six towns. On average, cycling in the six towns increased by about 27% (the black line) over 4 years. All the towns showed an upward trend in cycling. The biggest percentage increase was in Darlington, 57%, but starting from a very low base.
  • So what was it that these 18 towns and cities did to get more people cycling? What was the secret ingredient of their success?
  • There was no single ingredient….for the perfect recipe all the ingredients matter.
  • There’s the social norm barrier. If you never see anybody else on a bike, you’re not very likely to start cycling yourself.Bristol tackled that through a very successful Cycling Festival.
  • When I visited Seville for a VeloCity conference in 2011, this is what the Mayor of Seville said…
  • If you would like to read more about how we can change from a car-addicted culture to a sustainable transport culture….there’s a whole book (electronic version as well).
  • Lynn Sloman 05 11 13

    1. 1. Love Cycling – Go Dutch! Lynn Sloman 01654 781358 lynn@transportforqualityoflife.com www.transportforqualityoflife.com
    2. 2. Aim to increase cycling by 73% in two years - an extra 1.2 million cycling trips
    3. 3. Get Britain Cycling recommendations • Cycling budget of at least £10 per person per year, rising to £20 • Local and national bodies to allocate funds to cycling that are at least equal to the proportion of journeys by bike • Funding from government departments including Health, Education, Sport and Business, as well as DfT
    4. 4. Three Questions • Is it really possible to create a culture of cycling in a city that doesn’t already have it?....the story of how the Spanish city of Seville ‘went Dutch’ • How quickly can you ‘grow’ cycling?....the experience of the Cycling Demonstration Towns • What are the key ingredients?...what we learnt from the Cycling Demonstration Towns / Cycling City and Towns
    5. 5. Seville 4th largest city in Spain (700,000 population) Big roads…but also big traffic congestion ‘Too hot’ to be natural cycling territory
    6. 6. In six years: Cycling increased from 0.2% to 6.6% of all trips (and from 2,500 to 66,000 cyclists per day) >2000% increase!
    7. 7. Not just bike lanes… • Bike hire scheme: 2500 bicycles at 250 pick-up points • Free use of 200 folding bikes for university students / staff • 250 bikes for free use from city centre bus station • 5700 cycle parking spaces
    8. 8. Women now make up 50% of cyclists (up from 20%)
    9. 9. How much did it cost? • • • • €30 million 140 km network 4 years 700,000 population = €11 per citizen per year
    10. 10. Cycling Demonstration Towns % change in automatic cycle counts (2005 = 100%) 160 Darlington 150 Exeter Brighton and Hove 140 Lancaster w Morecambe Derby 130 Aylesbury All 120 110 100 Sloman et al. (2009) Analysis and synthesis of evidence on the effects of investment in six Cycling Demonstration Towns 90 80 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
    11. 11. Average annual change in average count per counter 6 CDTs and 12 CCTs 30 20 10 0 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 Average count per counter at baseline -10 -20 CDT -30 Sustrans RMU and Sloman: unpublished analysis CCT
    12. 12. What was the secret ingredient of their success?
    13. 13. For the recipe to work at all, there are several vital ingredients that must act together…
    14. 14. Why is this? Different ingredients added together can tackle all the different things that stop someone changing to cycling
    15. 15. What stops people cycling? (Potential) cyclist Habit: ‘I always drive’ Social norms: ‘All my friends drive’ Knowledge gap: No ‘mental map’ of pleasant cycle routes Objective reality: Poor quality cycle routes, busy roads, dispersed development
    16. 16. ‘No safe quiet route for the journey I make’ SOLUTION: High quality continuous ‘signature’ routes for all main radial corridors Aylesbury Seville(!) Brighton
    17. 17. ‘The cycle route gives out and ‘dumps me’ just when I need it most’ SOLUTION: Advanced stop lines and cycle crossings at main roads Edinburgh. Credit: Tony Russell The AA Edinburgh: Tony Russell
    18. 18. ‘There’s nowhere secure to park at my destination’ SOLUTION: Cycle parking at key destinations including employers and shops Cleary Stevens Consulting London: TfL
    19. 19. ‘I don’t own a bike!’ SOLUTION: Bike loan scheme so you can ‘try before you buy’
    20. 20. ‘I don’t know where the cycle routes go!’ SOLUTION: Widely distributed cycle maps + comprehensive cycle route signage
    21. 21. ‘I never see anybody else on a bike!’ SOLUTION: Cycling Festival – suddenly, it seems like everyone is on their bike
    22. 22. ‘I always get to work by car…it’s too much trouble to change’ SOLUTION: Workplace Cycle Challenge – encourage everyone to give cycling a go
    23. 23. So what have the Cycling Cities and Towns done? New cyclist Break habit: Give a reason to try something new Change the social norm: Even if just for a day Give information: Maps, signs, travel advice Objective reality: Build good cycle routes
    24. 24. “What we’ve done goes well beyond more cycle tracks and has become a tool to transform the city. There has been an extraordinary change of mindset. We have won a challenge to make our city more human.” Mayor of Seville Spring 2011

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