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Unlocking your research 2: measuringthe impact of your research                                                   Moira Be...
Researchers as producers as wellas consumers of information    Part 1: Pre publication: Maximising your impact -    How an...
Why do we want to know? Was anyone interested in my research?     Who, why, what did they do?     Making contacts and c...
Measuring impact:                                    Hmm, am                                                     I famous...
Impact factors  Use impact factors to:     Measure the impact of a journal on the community     Identify the relative im...
Counting citationsUse citation counts to see how often an ARTICLE has   been cited Web of Knowledge – Cited Reference Sea...
Counting downloads                     University Library
Who is reading it?                          Cited Reference searching                          Citation mapping         ...
Cited reference searching Find out how many times a particular piece of  work has been cited. Discover who is citing a s...
Citation mapping: who and where                                  University Library
Citation alerts Alert you to when a new article is indexed in  which your work is cited. WoK, Scopus, Zetoc, Google Scho...
The h-index measures the impact of anindividual PERSON  Impact?   I wonder who  I’ll squash if I  fall?                   ...
Calculating the h indexA scholar with an index of h has published h papers, each of   which has been cited by others at le...
How does the H-index work?Paper 1   cited   162 timesPaper 2                  94 timesPaper 3                  37 timesPap...
How does the H-index work?       Paper 1     cited 162 times       Paper 2                  94 times       Paper 3        ...
H index issues   Comparing apples and pears   Varies depending on database   Varies depending on discipline   One semi...
Other sources: Google Scholar Citations www.scholar.google.co.uk     Can work out your personal citation data     Widge...
Google Scholar Citation toolhttp://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=DuejtHQAAAAJ&hl=en                                 ...
g and m index…The g-index (Leo Egghe)the g-index is the (unique) largest number such that the top garticles received (toge...
Making an impactMake all your publications count   Decide on the form of your name and be       consistent    Register fo...
More informationLibrary Guide on Research Impact:http://libguides.ncl.ac.uk/impactMyRI:http://www.ndlr.ie/myri/           ...
It’s so niceto beperfect!               University Library
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  1. 1. Unlocking your research 2: measuringthe impact of your research Moira Bent & Julia RobinsonTracy Speeding at www.flickr.com/shutterbugsheep University Library
  2. 2. Researchers as producers as wellas consumers of information Part 1: Pre publication: Maximising your impact - How and where to publish • Journal impact factors to identify the best journal • Open access publishing – what and why • Alternative places to publish • Issues to be aware of • Plagiarism • Copyright Part2: Post Publication: Measuring your impact • Who has been reading it? • How often? • Where from? • Have I made a difference? University Library
  3. 3. Why do we want to know? Was anyone interested in my research?  Who, why, what did they do?  Making contacts and connections for future collaborations Feel good factor – exciting, challenging Making a difference – social responsibility Building your reputation, recognition To report back to funder REF University Library
  4. 4. Measuring impact: Hmm, am I famous Impact factors yet?  How much impact does a specific journal have on the community?  How many times are articles from that journal cited by others? Citation counting/downloading  How often was a specific article cited/read by others? H-index (and g and m indexes…)  What impact is an individual person having on the community  How important is an individual? Web page/blog hits  informal/imprecise  But interesting and useful connections  http://www.moirabent.blogspot.com/ University Library
  5. 5. Impact factors Use impact factors to:  Measure the impact of a journal on the community  Identify the relative importance of a journal  Identify key journals to read  Identify places to publish  Measure the quality of research output of an institution (RAE/REF) Find Impact Factors using:  ISI JCR : Journal Citation Reports (Web of Knowledge) Limitations of the JCR  Only covers journals indexed in the Web of Science  Known subject gaps eg engineering  US bias  May not cover new or niche subject areas  New / changed titles not covered for 2-3 years University Library
  6. 6. Counting citationsUse citation counts to see how often an ARTICLE has been cited Web of Knowledge – Cited Reference Searching  Well established  Good coverage, within limits  Citation mapping tool Scopus  Different coverage  More open access titles  Citation counts and tracking Google Scholar  Not specific in terms of coverage  Picks up non traditional publications eg eprints  Citation counts and tracking CiteseerX and others  http://csxstatic.ist.psu.edu/about University Library
  7. 7. Counting downloads University Library
  8. 8. Who is reading it?  Cited Reference searching  Citation mapping  Citation alerts using  WoK  Zetoc  Google Scholar  Publish or Perish  Citeseer University Library Image used: http://www.flickr.com/photos/asimulator/3258082746/
  9. 9. Cited reference searching Find out how many times a particular piece of work has been cited. Discover who is citing a specific piece of research. Discover how older research is influencing newer research. Track the work of a specific researcher. University Library
  10. 10. Citation mapping: who and where University Library
  11. 11. Citation alerts Alert you to when a new article is indexed in which your work is cited. WoK, Scopus, Zetoc, Google Scholar and other databases. University Library
  12. 12. The h-index measures the impact of anindividual PERSON Impact? I wonder who I’ll squash if I fall? University Library
  13. 13. Calculating the h indexA scholar with an index of h has published h papers, each of which has been cited by others at least h timesUse WoK or Scopus  Clegg, William WoK h=59 Scopus h=43  Gatehouse, A WoK h=41 Scopus h=31  Briddon, P WoK h=41 Scopus h=41 May vary depending on forms of author name, affiliation etc As with any metric, use with caution! University Library
  14. 14. How does the H-index work?Paper 1 cited 162 timesPaper 2 94 timesPaper 3 37 timesPaper 4 12 timesPaper 5 6 timesPaper 6 4 timesPaper 7 4 timesPaper 8 3 times University Library
  15. 15. How does the H-index work? Paper 1 cited 162 times Paper 2 94 times Paper 3 37 times Paper 4 12 times Paper 5___________ 6 times Paper 6 4 times Paper 7 4 times Paper 8 3 times University Library
  16. 16. H index issues Comparing apples and pears Varies depending on database Varies depending on discipline One seminal paper does not imply high h-index Doesn’t recognise new researchers Doesn’t allow weighting in multi-authored papers Can be slightly skewed by self citation May miss out key articles May not account for books, book chapters, reports and other types of resource University Library
  17. 17. Other sources: Google Scholar Citations www.scholar.google.co.uk  Can work out your personal citation data  Widget for other people’s data – accuracy is debatable http://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=DuejtHQAAAAJ  Has h-index for journals as well as individuals Publish or Perish: (http://www.harzing.com/pop.htm) (free)  Uses Google Scholar citations, and runs as standalone software that links to the web.  Has to be downloaded  Difficult to identify publications  Less accurate than Scopus or WoS, . University Library
  18. 18. Google Scholar Citation toolhttp://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=DuejtHQAAAAJ&hl=en University Library
  19. 19. g and m index…The g-index (Leo Egghe)the g-index is the (unique) largest number such that the top garticles received (together) at least g2 citations.It aims to improve on the h-index by giving more weight tohighly-cited articles.The m-index is defined as h/n, where n is the number of yearssince the first published paper of the scientistSee Wiley issue on bibliometrics for more articles:http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-380979.html University Library
  20. 20. Making an impactMake all your publications count Decide on the form of your name and be consistent  Register for a ResearcherID http://isiwebofknowledge.com/researcherid/  And/or on academia.edu http://newcastle.academia.edu/MoiraBent  And/or on ResearchGate http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Moira_ Bent/ And/or LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/moira- bent/27/303/a68 University Library
  21. 21. More informationLibrary Guide on Research Impact:http://libguides.ncl.ac.uk/impactMyRI:http://www.ndlr.ie/myri/ University Library
  22. 22. It’s so niceto beperfect! University Library

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