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Your Research Impact:
how to measure the impact of your publications
OR
Am I famous yet?
Moira Bent

Tracy Speeding at www...
Making and measuring impact workshops

Things to consider pre-publication
• Create an (academic) online profile
• Understa...
Why do we want to know?
 Was anyone interested in my research?
 Who, why, what did they do?
 Making contacts and connec...
Measuring impact:






Of a Journal
 How much impact does a specific journal have on the
community?
 How many times ...
Journal impact using Impact Factors
Use impact factors to:






Measure the impact of a journal on the community
Ide...
Article impact: Counting citations
Use citation counts to see how often an ARTICLE has
been cited
 Web of Knowledge – Cit...
Article impact: Counting downloads

University Library
Article impact: Who is reading it?
 Cited Reference searching
 Citation mapping
 Citation alerts
using
 WoK
 Zetoc
 ...
Article impact:Cited reference searching
 Find out how many times a particular piece of
work has been cited.
 Discover w...
Citation mapping: who and where

University Library
Citation alerts
 Alert you to when a new article is indexed in
which your work is cited.
 WoK, Scopus, Zetoc, Google Sch...
The h-index measures the impact of an
individual PERSON
Impact?
I wonder who
I’ll squash if I
fall?
Calculating the h index
A scholar with an index of h has published h papers, each of
which has been cited by others at lea...
How does the H-index work?

Paper 1
Paper 2
Paper 3
Paper 4
Paper 5
Paper 6
Paper 7
Paper 8

cited

162 times
94 times
37 ...
How does the H-index work?

Paper 1
cited 162 times
Paper 2
94 times
Paper 3
37 times
Paper 4
12 times
Paper 5___________
...
H index issues










Comparing apples and pears
Varies depending on database
Varies depending on discipline
O...
Other sources:
 Google Scholar Citations www.scholar.google.co.uk
 Can work out your personal citation data
 Widget for...
Google Scholar Citation tool
http://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=DuejtHQAAAAJ&hl=en
g and m index…
The g-index (Leo Egghe)
the g-index is the (unique) largest number such that the top g
articles received (t...
Other publication types
 Conference papers and reports
 may be indexed in databases such as WoK
 Individual collections...
Altmetrics- alternative metrics
 Altmetrics manifesto http://altmetrics.org/manifesto/
“No-one can read everything…”
 Tr...
Altmetrics data is being collected from many
sources
 Views – HTML views and PDF downloads
 Mentions – blog posts, Wikip...
Maximising your altmetrics impact
For example, create a profile on
 ResearchGate
http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Moir...
University Library
University Library
Organisations and publishers are already
collecting and displaying altmetrics

University Library
University Library
Altmetric.com

University Library
Example paper on Altmetric.com
http://prl.aps.org/abstract/PRL/v13/i16/p508_1
University Library
News

University Library
Issues?
 Do altmetrics reflect actual impact or just „buzz‟?
 Can altmetrics distinguish „scholarly interest‟ from
„soci...
More information
Library Guide on Research Impact:
http://libguides.ncl.ac.uk/impact
MyRI:
http://www.ndlr.ie/myri/

Unive...
It’s so nice
to be
perfect!

University Library
Measuring impact (for Newcastle University Research Staff)
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Measuring impact (for Newcastle University Research Staff)

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Measuring impact (for Newcastle University Research Staff)

  1. 1. Your Research Impact: how to measure the impact of your publications OR Am I famous yet? Moira Bent Tracy Speeding at www.flickr.com/shutterbugsheep University Library
  2. 2. Making and measuring impact workshops Things to consider pre-publication • Create an (academic) online profile • Understand & use the Journal Citation Report (JCR) and other journal ranking tools • Understand Open Access publishing models • Understand how to apply for OA publishing funds at Newcastle University Things to consider post publication • Who has been reading it? • How often? • Where from? • Have I made a difference? University Library
  3. 3. Why do we want to know?  Was anyone interested in my research?  Who, why, what did they do?  Making contacts and connections for future collaborations     Feel good factor – exciting, challenging Making a difference – social responsibility Building your reputation, recognition To report back to funder  REF University Library
  4. 4. Measuring impact:    Of a Journal  How much impact does a specific journal have on the community?  How many times are articles from that journal cited by others?  Use Impact Factors Of an article  How often was a specific article cited/read by others?  Count citations  Count downloads/views Of an individual author  What impact is an individual person having on the community  How important is an individual?  Use h-index and other metrics  Use Altmetrics  Count web/blog page hits Hmm, am I famous yet?
  5. 5. Journal impact using Impact Factors Use impact factors to:      Measure the impact of a journal on the community Identify the relative importance of a journal Identify key journals to read Identify places to publish Measure the quality of research output of an institution (RAE/REF) Find Impact Factors using:  ISI JCR : Journal Citation Reports (Web of Knowledge) Limitations of the JCR      Only covers journals indexed in the Web of Science Known subject gaps eg engineering US bias May not cover new or niche subject areas New / changed titles not covered for 2-3 years University Library
  6. 6. Article impact: Counting citations Use citation counts to see how often an ARTICLE has been cited  Web of Knowledge – Cited Reference Searching  Well established  Good coverage, within limits  Citation mapping tool  Scopus  Different coverage  More open access titles  Citation counts and tracking  Google Scholar  Not specific in terms of coverage  Picks up non traditional publications eg eprints  Citation counts and tracking  CiteseerX and others  http://csxstatic.ist.psu.edu/about University Library
  7. 7. Article impact: Counting downloads University Library
  8. 8. Article impact: Who is reading it?  Cited Reference searching  Citation mapping  Citation alerts using  WoK  Zetoc  Google Scholar  Publish or Perish  Citeseer University Library Image used: http://www.flickr.com/photos/asimulator/3258082746/
  9. 9. Article impact:Cited reference searching  Find out how many times a particular piece of work has been cited.  Discover who is citing a specific piece of research.  Discover how older research is influencing newer research.  Track the work of a specific researcher. University Library
  10. 10. Citation mapping: who and where University Library
  11. 11. Citation alerts  Alert you to when a new article is indexed in which your work is cited.  WoK, Scopus, Zetoc, Google Scholar and other databases. University Library
  12. 12. The h-index measures the impact of an individual PERSON Impact? I wonder who I’ll squash if I fall?
  13. 13. Calculating the h index A scholar with an index of h has published h papers, each of which has been cited by others at least h times Use WoK or Scopus  Clegg, William  Gatehouse, A  Briddon, P WoK h=61 Scopus h=48 WoK h=42 Scopus h=33 WoK h=44 Scopus h=42  May vary depending on forms of author name, affiliation etc  As with any metric, use with caution! University Library
  14. 14. How does the H-index work? Paper 1 Paper 2 Paper 3 Paper 4 Paper 5 Paper 6 Paper 7 Paper 8 cited 162 times 94 times 37 times 12 times 6 times 4 times 4 times 3 times University Library
  15. 15. How does the H-index work? Paper 1 cited 162 times Paper 2 94 times Paper 3 37 times Paper 4 12 times Paper 5___________ 6 times Paper 6 4 times Paper 7 4 times Paper 8 3 times University Library
  16. 16. H index issues          Comparing apples and pears Varies depending on database Varies depending on discipline One seminal paper does not imply high h-index Doesn‟t recognise new researchers Doesn‟t allow weighting in multi-authored papers Can be slightly skewed by self citation May miss out key articles May not account for books, book chapters, reports and other types of resource University Library
  17. 17. Other sources:  Google Scholar Citations www.scholar.google.co.uk  Can work out your personal citation data  Widget for other people‟s data – accuracy is debatable http://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=DuejtHQAAAAJ  Has h-index for journals as well as individuals  Publish or Perish: (http://www.harzing.com/pop.htm) (free)     Uses Google Scholar citations, and runs as standalone software that links to the web. Has to be downloaded Difficult to identify publications Less accurate than Scopus or WoS, . University Library
  18. 18. Google Scholar Citation tool http://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=DuejtHQAAAAJ&hl=en
  19. 19. g and m index… The g-index (Leo Egghe) the g-index is the (unique) largest number such that the top g articles received (together) at least g2 citations. It aims to improve on the h-index by giving more weight to highly-cited articles. The m-index is defined as h/n, where n is the number of years since the first published paper of the scientist University Library
  20. 20. Other publication types  Conference papers and reports  may be indexed in databases such as WoK  Individual collections eg ACM digital library may provide citation info  Books – citation data included in some databases (esp Google Scholar) but inconsistent.  Book reviews  library holdings (Worldcat)  sales University Library
  21. 21. Altmetrics- alternative metrics  Altmetrics manifesto http://altmetrics.org/manifesto/ “No-one can read everything…”  Traditional filters (citation counts, h-index, JIF…)      Slow, take a long time to accumulate Don‟t always measure impact at article level Restricted – behind paywalls Neglect impact outside of academia Don‟t take account of scholarly attention received via new channels  The creation and study of new metrics based on the social web for analysing and informing scholarship  A supplemental measure of the quality of scholarship University Library
  22. 22. Altmetrics data is being collected from many sources  Views – HTML views and PDF downloads  Mentions – blog posts, Wikipedia articles, online news items, comments on blog posts, etc  Social Media – Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, etc  Captures/Shares – Mendeley, CiteULike, social bookmarks, etc  Cites – citations in the scholarly literature, tracked by Web of Science, PubMed, Scopus, etc Combination of scholarly attention and social/public attention University Library
  23. 23. Maximising your altmetrics impact For example, create a profile on  ResearchGate http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Moira_Bent/  Academia.edu http://newcastle.academia.edu/MoiraBent  LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/moira-bent/27/303/a68 Or write a blog/ tweet/ join other social research networks University Library
  24. 24. University Library
  25. 25. University Library
  26. 26. Organisations and publishers are already collecting and displaying altmetrics University Library
  27. 27. University Library
  28. 28. Altmetric.com University Library
  29. 29. Example paper on Altmetric.com http://prl.aps.org/abstract/PRL/v13/i16/p508_1
  30. 30. University Library
  31. 31. News University Library
  32. 32. Issues?  Do altmetrics reflect actual impact or just „buzz‟?  Can altmetrics distinguish „scholarly interest‟ from „social interest‟?  Isn‟t „gaming‟ easy?  Tools to enable institutional comparisons much less developed than tools for individual researcher  Can be difficult to interpret – require scrutiny, contextualisation and interpretation University Library
  33. 33. More information Library Guide on Research Impact: http://libguides.ncl.ac.uk/impact MyRI: http://www.ndlr.ie/myri/ University Library
  34. 34. It’s so nice to be perfect! University Library

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