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Leadership Instinct

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  • Managing people can sometimes make you feel like you're running a zoo. This program is designed to help you tame your inner animal by giving valuable insight about your own personal Leadership Instinct. Each instinct has positive and negative aspects. During this presentation, you will learn how to focus on your positive instincts rather than the negatives, so you can become a more effective manager.
  • In the book 100 Worst Bosses , by Jim Stovall, author of The Ultimate Gift and Ultimate Productivity , we get a look at the characteristics shared by some of the worst bosses through the eyes of the employees who have to work with them. And, while the stories in 100 Worst Bosses are extreme examples of bosses gone wild, there are many lessons about leadership we can learn from them. This Leadership Instinct training program is based on Stovall’s book and the lessons it teaches about management. So let’s dig in.
  • So, what’s your Leadership Instinct? Are you a hardworking, domineering tiger or a detail-oriented fox? Are you fun and overly enthusiastic like the chameleon or more easy going and amiable like the ostrich? No matter what your instinct is, learning more about how you interact with your employees and co-workers is the first step to becoming the best leader you can be. There is no right or wrong instinct. The important part is understanding your particular instinct and how its positive and negative characteristics affect the way you lead.
  • Share a couple tiger boss stories from 100 Worst Bosses (pages 162-169) Tigers take charge and get things done. Their power and strength make them a driving force in the workplace and they are quick to take on difficult challenges when they arise. They are objective-focused, hardworking, energetic, and decisive. A tiger is not afraid of a little conflict and will always fight to stay on task. Victory is constantly on the mind of tiger bosses and they will fight to the very end to achieve it.
  • However, when their worst boss instinct takes over, tiger bosses can become like their animal namesake – focused on consuming their prey instead of leading. Their drive and confidence can quickly become bossiness and arrogance. A tiger boss almost seems to enjoy the effect that their overbearing and controlling behavior has on their employees and many even try to find opportunities to exert their power on subordinates. Other types of bosses in 100 Worst Bosses that often share some of the same characteristics as the tiger include: Rat Bear Snapping turtle Snake Peacock Vulture Porcupine
  • Take 5 minutes to answer questions on page 2 of your workbook, and then we will briefly discuss your answers. Discussion Who are the tigers in your workplace? Ask those who are identified as tigers to share whether or not they think it describes them accurately. What are three to five good ways to work with a Tiger? Share and discuss feedback. What positive traits do specific Tigers bring to your company and team? Discuss feedback and how the positive traits affect the company. What negative tendencies do specific Tigers bring to your company and team? Discuss feedback and how the negative tendencies affect the company. What immediate action(s) can you take to improve your relationships with the Tigers in your life? Share and discuss feedback.
  • If you are the office tiger, there are some key opportunities for growth. Seek input from others. You may firmly believe it’s always your way or the highway. And, while you may be right a lot of the time, there is always another perspective to any problem. Seek out input from others. Your team may very well have some good ideas, but because of your ferocious tiger instinct, they may be too intimidated to share them. Ask people instead of telling them. Growling orders at your team may seem effective from a tiger’s point of view, but it only builds fear and resentment among their employees. Try taking a softer approach. Asking for your team’s participation instead of aggressively telling them what they are going to do. Learn how to delegate effectively. You don’t have to do it all yourself. Trust your employees and delegate some of your workload to them. A tiger’s need to control every single detail from beginning to end can some times be too much and can create a lot of stress that could have been avoided by relying on others around them for assistance. Approach conflict from a win-win perspective. A tiger boss needs to learn to be flexible and consider others points of view. Instead of clawing and fighting their way through the workplace without regard for anyone who gets in their way, a tiger should seek out win-win compromises when issues arise. Because tigers can be particularly stubborn when it comes to conflict, many people will simply get tired of arguing and let them have their way - even if their way is wrong. Repeat after me: I am not always right. I am not always right.
  • Share a couple fox boss stories from 100 Worst Bosses (pages 82-90) Foxes are rulers of the spreadsheet and keep the day-planner, calendar, and organizational tool industries running. Their love of research and details makes them go-to resources for information. Foxes are extremely detail oriented and analytical. There isn’t a single angle to any problem they haven’t considered, researched, and analyzed. Every decision a fox makes is based on a mountain of facts they have painstakingly gathered.
  • But, sometimes this analytical approach can make a fox difficult to work with. They are often overly critical of others, skeptical, perfectionist, and task-focused. Because a fox has the tendency to overanalyze a situation, and they are often pessimistic that any outcome will be effective. A fox is comfortable living in their world of facts, figures and constant research that they are often unsociable and resistant to change. Other animals in 100 Worst Bosses that often share some of the the same characteristics as the fox include: Weasel Vulture Snake Porcupine Shrew
  • Take 5 minutes to answer questions on page 4 of your workbook and then we will briefly discuss your answers. Discussion Who are the foxes in your workplace? Ask those who are identified as foxes to share whether or not they think it describes them accurately. What are three to five good ways to work with a Fox? Share and discuss feedback. What positive traits do specific foxes bring to your company and team? Discuss feedback and how the positive traits affect the company. What negative tendencies do specific foxes bring to your company and team? Discuss feedback and how the negative tendencies affect the company. What immediate action(s) can you take to improve your relationships with the foxes in your life? Share and discuss feedback.
  • If you are the office fox, there are some key opportunities for growth. Learn to use your intuition more often. Foxes should learn to give themselves a little credit. Because of their analytical nature, a fox often already knows the right answer to many problems, but they still feel that research should be done to confirm it. A fox should strive to trust their intuition more often and not be afraid to make a quick decision. Set time limits when you do research. In a fox’s mind, there is always another angle to research. And, if they aren’t careful, foxes can spend all their time researching without ever really making any progress. A fox needs to learn to set time limits for themselves when researching a new project. At some point, they need to just roll up their sleeves and start working. If issues arise along the way, a fox needs to learn how to deal with them on the fly. Use your analytic skills to look for opportunities instead of obstacles. Foxes automatically see anything and everything that can go wrong, which can sometimes be helpful. But, those same strong analytical skills that are so keen at spotting the bad, could just as easily be used to find new, positive opportunities to pursue if they can train themselves to keep an open mind and not to dwell on the negative. Develop relationships with co-workers. A fox tends to view co-workers as their subordinates, or simply, those other people that work here. Because their heads are usually buried in a pile of research, foxes don’t develop close relationships with their co-workers easily. A fox should concentrate taking the initiative to be part of the group or to include others in their research. Repeat after me: I am not smarter than everyone else. I am not smarter than everyone else.
  • Share a couple chameleon boss stories from 100 Worst Bosses . (pages 136-144) Welcome to the party! Chameleons are the type of people who write with lots of exclamation points! They are excited about everything! And focus on having fun! Their enthusiasm is catching, and they make great presenters! Because of their warm, social, and enthusiastic nature, chameleons can be very persuasive. Chameleons can make even the most grueling work seem fun, which is why they always have plenty of support for their projects.
  • But, sometimes too much of a good thing is a bad thing – and all play and no work doesn’t end very well. Because of their need to be everyone’s friend and their fear of letting someone down, chameleons often over-promise and under-deliver. A chameleon is easily distracted and can be flaky and unreliable. And, because they are many times more focused on making work fun and being the energetic, talkative leader everyone wants to be around, chameleons tend to fall behind and lose track of deadlines. Other animals in 100 Worst Bosses that often share some of the the same characteristics as the chameleon include: Hyena Looney bird Peacock
  • Take 5 minutes to answer the questions on page 6 of your workbook and then we will briefly discuss your answers. Discussion Who are the chameleons in your workplace? Ask if those who are identified as chameleons to share whether or not they think it describes them accurately. What are three to five good ways to work with a chameleon? Share and discuss feedback. What positive traits do specific chameleons bring to your company and team? Discuss feedback and how the positive traits affect the company. What negative tendencies do specific chameleons bring to your company and team? Discuss feedback and how the negative tendencies affect the company. What immediate action(s) can you take to improve your relationships with the chameleons in your life? Share and discuss feedback.
  • If you are the office chameleon, there are some key opportunities for growth. Stick to schedules. Because of their fun and carefree personalities, chameleons are notorious for missing deadlines and ignoring schedules. A chameleon should learn to view missing deadlines as letting someone down. They need to realize that their fun and games are often at their co-workers expense. Reign in emotions at work. While a chameleon shouldn’t feel like their upbeat and energetic personality is a fault, they need to understand that there is a time and a place for it. A chameleon should practice reigning in their emotions and saving them for the appropriate occasions. Practice basic time management skills. Learning some basic time management skills can be very beneficial for a chameleon. They have the drive and enthusiasm it takes to do the work. They just need some structure to keep them focused and on track. Be realistic about what you can accomplish. Chameleons don’t want to let others down and as a result, they will often over-promise and bite off more than they can chew. A chameleon needs to realize that the deadlines begin to pile up, sometimes it’s ok to say no. Repeat after me: Life is not just a big party. Life is not just a big party.
  • Share a couple ostrich boss stories from 100 Worst Bosses . (pages 50-57) Ostriches don’t like to ruffle anyone’s feathers. They are easy going and peacemakers. Friends and co-workers go to them to smooth over problems and keep the peace. An ostrich is trustworthy and amiable and can be a good source for advice when you are faced with a difficult situation.
  • But, sometimes they take their need for peace and serenity too far, avoid problems, and give in rather than debate an issue. An ostrich will go to great lengths to avoid conflict and when put on the spot, can be very indecisive. Their non-confrontational nature causes an ostrich to ignore problems and they are often too soft-spoken or are viewed as a pushover by their co-workers. Other animals in 100 Worst Bosses that often share some of the same characteristics as the ostrich include: Mole Fish Skunk Porcupine
  • Take 5 minutes to answer the questions on page 8 of your workbook, and then we will briefly discuss your answers. Discussion Who are the ostriches in your workplace? Ask if those who are identified as ostriches to share whether or not they think it describes them accurately. What are three to five good ways to work with an ostrich? Share and discuss feedback. What positive traits do specific ostriches bring to your company and team? Discuss feedback and how the positive traits affect the company. What negative tendencies do specific ostriches bring to your company and team? Discuss feedback and how the negative tendencies affect the company. What immediate action(s) can you take to improve your relationships with the ostriches in your life? Share and discuss feedback.
  • If you are the office ostrich, there are some key opportunities for growth. Voice your opinion. So as not to look like they are taking a particular side, an ostrich will often stay quiet during an argument or debate. Ostriches need to stop worrying about ruffling anyone’s feathers and work on constructively voicing their opinion. Allow constructive conflict to happen. Conflict isn’t always bad. An ostrich needs to understand the benefits of constructive conflict and not try to avoid getting involved. As long as it stays under control and respectful, conflict can be very positive and can help drive new ideas or decision making. Set timelines for making decisions. It doesn’t matter how long they avoid it, an ostrich will eventually be forced to make a decision. Ostriches should set a timeline for making decisions and announce that timeline to their co-workers in order to stay accountable. Address problems immediately. By avoiding problems because they are afraid of the consequences of making a decision, an ostrich could actually be making matters worse. The longer it is left alone, the bigger a problem will become. Ostriches need to make decisions based on what they believe is the best course of action for a given situation and stop worrying so much about who they are going to upset. Repeat after me: Do not bury my head in the sand. Do not bury my head in the sand.
  • Learn more about your strengths and weaknesses. Once you understand your strengths and weaknesses, it will be easier to develop your positive characteristics and to rid yourself of the negative ones. Discuss your leadership instinct with your co-workers. Knowing your co-workers’ Leadership Instinct can help you build a better understanding for how the individual members of your team work and what are the best ways to work together. Develop a Leadership Instinct action plan. A Leadership Instinct action plan is a plan to learn more about and further develop your Leadership Instinct.
  • Take 5 minutes to fill out the Leadership Instinct Action Plan on page 11 of your workbook and then we will briefly discuss your answers. What are your top three actions items for improving your Leadership Instinct within the next month? Ask for volunteers to share and then discuss feedback. What are your top three action items for improving how you work with your manager within the next month? Ask for volunteers to share and then discuss feedback. How do you plan to improve your Leadership Instincts over the next year? Ask for volunteers to share and then discuss feedback. Who will help keep you accountable for improving your Leadership Instincts? Encourage them to find someone in the company to help them stay accountable while they work on developing their Lleadership Instincts.
  • So, have you learned how to tame your Leadership Instinct? We hope you use the tools and information provided in this training program to improve your leadership skills. Knowing your natural tendencies and how to focus them in a positive way will help you in your journey as a leader. And, knowing your co-workers instincts and how to work with them will help create teamwork and greater understanding among your staff. And, of course, Express Employment Professionals is here to continue helping you on your leadership path. For more information and training materials, be sure to visit MyLeadershipInstinct.com and our leadership blog, RefreshLeadership.com.
  • P:\Power Point Presentations\Leadership Instinct

    1. 2. 100 Worst Bosses <ul><li>Written by Jim Stovall, best selling author of The Ultimate Gift and Ultimate Productivity </li></ul><ul><li>Describes the characteristics shared by some of the worst bosses </li></ul><ul><li>The Leadership Instinct training program is based on the lessons taught in 100 Worst Bosses </li></ul>
    2. 3. So, what’s your Leadership Instinct? <ul><li>Tiger </li></ul><ul><li>Fox </li></ul><ul><li>Chameleon </li></ul><ul><li>Ostrich </li></ul>
    3. 4. Positive Tiger Characteristics <ul><li>Director </li></ul><ul><li>Driver </li></ul><ul><li>Decisive </li></ul><ul><li>Activator </li></ul><ul><li>Focused </li></ul><ul><li>Hardworking </li></ul><ul><li>Energetic </li></ul><ul><li>Likes conflict </li></ul>
    4. 5. Negative Tiger Characteristics <ul><li>Arrogant </li></ul><ul><li>Stubborn </li></ul><ul><li>Dominating </li></ul><ul><li>Commanding </li></ul><ul><li>Confrontational </li></ul><ul><li>Defensive </li></ul><ul><li>Inflexible </li></ul><ul><li>Blunt </li></ul>
    5. 6. Tiger <ul><li>Who are the Tigers in your workplace? </li></ul><ul><li>What are three to five good ways to work with a Tiger? </li></ul><ul><li>What positive traits do specific Tigers bring to your company and team? </li></ul><ul><li>What negative tendencies do specific Tigers bring to your company and team? </li></ul><ul><li>What immediate action(s) can you take to improve your relationships with the Tigers in your life? </li></ul>
    6. 7. Key Growth Opportunities for Tigers <ul><li>Seek input from others. </li></ul><ul><li>Ask people instead of telling them. </li></ul><ul><li>Learn how to delegate effectively. </li></ul><ul><li>Approach conflict from a win-win perspective. </li></ul>
    7. 8. Positive Fox Characteristics <ul><li>Thinking </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluating </li></ul><ul><li>Factual </li></ul><ul><li>List Maker </li></ul><ul><li>Analytical </li></ul><ul><li>Detail-oriented </li></ul><ul><li>Perceptive </li></ul><ul><li>Rational </li></ul>
    8. 9. Negative Fox Characteristics <ul><li>Critical of others </li></ul><ul><li>Pessimistic </li></ul><ul><li>Over-analyzing </li></ul><ul><li>Task-focused </li></ul><ul><li>Skeptical </li></ul><ul><li>Unsociable </li></ul><ul><li>Perfectionist </li></ul><ul><li>Resists change </li></ul>
    9. 10. Fox <ul><li>Who are the Foxes in your workplace? </li></ul><ul><li>What are three to five good ways to work with a Fox? </li></ul><ul><li>What positive traits do specific Foxes bring to your company and team? </li></ul><ul><li>What negative tendencies do specific Foxes bring to your company and team? </li></ul><ul><li>What immediate action(s) can you take to improve your relationships with the Foxes in your life? </li></ul>
    10. 11. Key Growth Opportunities for Foxes <ul><li>Learn to use your intuition more often. </li></ul><ul><li>Set time limits when you do research. </li></ul><ul><li>Use your analytic skills to look for opportunities instead of obstacles. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop relationships with co-workers. </li></ul>
    11. 12. Positive Chameleon Characteristics <ul><li>Persuasive </li></ul><ul><li>Intuitive </li></ul><ul><li>Social </li></ul><ul><li>Fun </li></ul><ul><li>Friendly </li></ul><ul><li>Warm </li></ul><ul><li>Enthusiastic </li></ul><ul><li>Inspiring </li></ul>
    12. 13. Negative Chameleon Characteristics <ul><li>Over promises </li></ul><ul><li>Under delivers </li></ul><ul><li>Talkative </li></ul><ul><li>Emotional </li></ul><ul><li>Unreliable </li></ul><ul><li>Flaky </li></ul><ul><li>Procrastinating </li></ul><ul><li>Easily distracted </li></ul>
    13. 14. Chameleon <ul><li>Who are the Chameleons in your workplace? </li></ul><ul><li>What are three to five good ways to work with a Chameleon? </li></ul><ul><li>What positive traits do specific Chameleons bring to your company and team? </li></ul><ul><li>What negative tendencies do specific Chameleons bring to your company and team? </li></ul><ul><li>What immediate action(s) can you take to improve your relationships with the Chameleons in your life? </li></ul>
    14. 15. Key Growth Opportunities for Chameleons <ul><li>Stick to schedules. </li></ul><ul><li>Reign in emotions at work. </li></ul><ul><li>Practice basic time management skills. </li></ul><ul><li>Be realistic about what you can accomplish. </li></ul>
    15. 16. Positive Ostrich Characteristics <ul><li>Easygoing </li></ul><ul><li>Laid back </li></ul><ul><li>Peaceful </li></ul><ul><li>Amiable </li></ul><ul><li>Agreeable </li></ul><ul><li>Trustworthy </li></ul><ul><li>Compromiser </li></ul><ul><li>Problem solver </li></ul>
    16. 17. Negative Ostrich Characteristics <ul><li>Avoids conflict </li></ul><ul><li>Indecisive </li></ul><ul><li>Ignores problems </li></ul><ul><li>Soft-spoken </li></ul><ul><li>Non-confrontational </li></ul><ul><li>Resists change </li></ul><ul><li>Enabler </li></ul><ul><li>Pushover </li></ul>
    17. 18. Ostrich <ul><li>Who are the Ostriches in your workplace? </li></ul><ul><li>What are three to five good ways to work with an Ostrich? </li></ul><ul><li>What positive traits do specific Ostriches bring to your company and team? </li></ul><ul><li>What negative tendencies do specific Ostriches bring to your company and team? </li></ul><ul><li>What immediate action(s) can you take to improve your relationships with the Ostriches in your life? </li></ul>
    18. 19. Key Growth Opportunities <ul><li>Voice your opinion. </li></ul><ul><li>Allow constructive conflict to happen. </li></ul><ul><li>Set timelines for making decisions. </li></ul><ul><li>Address problems immediately. </li></ul>
    19. 20. I’m a _____. Now what? <ul><li>Learn more about your strengths and weaknesses. </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss your leadership instinct with your co-workers. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a Leadership Instinct action plan. </li></ul>
    20. 21. Leadership Instinct Action Plan <ul><li>What are your top three action items for improving your Leadership Instinct within the next month? </li></ul><ul><li>What are your top three action items for improving how you work with your manager within the next month? </li></ul><ul><li>How do you plan to improve your Leadership Instincts over the next year? </li></ul><ul><li>Who will help keep you accountable for improving your Leadership Instincts? </li></ul>
    21. 22. Conclusion <ul><li>Learn about your own Leadership Instinct. </li></ul><ul><li>Learn about your co-workers’ Leadership Instincts. </li></ul><ul><li>Explore our other resources: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>MyLeadershipInstinct.com </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>RefreshLeadership.com </li></ul></ul></ul>

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