CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module Installation Guide for ...

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CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module Installation Guide for ...

  1. 1. ® CoreBuilder 5000 ™ Network Router Module Installation Guide for Token Ring http://www.3com.com/ Document Number 17-00670-3 Published May 1997
  2. 2. 3Com Corporation Copyright © 3Com Corporation, 1997. All rights reserved. No part of this documentation may be 5400 Bayfront Plaza reproduced in any form or by any means, or used to make any derivative work (such as translation, transformation, or adaptation) without permission from 3Com Corporation. Portions of this document are Santa Clara, California reproduced in whole or part with permission from third parties. 95052-8145 3Com Corporation reserves the right to revise this documentation and to make changes in content from time to time without obligation on the part of 3Com Corporation to provide notification of such revision or change. 3Com Corporation provides this documentation without warranty of any kind, either implied or expressed, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. 3Com may make improvements or changes in the products or programs described in this documentation at any time. UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT LEGENDS: If you are a United States government agency, then this documentation and the software described herein are provided to you subject to the following restricted rights: For units of the Department of Defense: Restricted Rights Legend: Use, duplication, or disclosure by the Government is subject to restrictions as set forth in subparagraph (c) (1) (ii) for Restricted Rights in Technical Data and Computer Software Clause at 48 C.F.R. 52.227-7013. For civilian agencies: Restricted Rights Legend: Use, reproduction, or disclosure is subject to restrictions set forth in subparagraph (a) through (d) of the Commercial Computer Software – Restricted Rights Clause at 48 C.F.R. 52.227-19 and the limitations set forth in the 3Com Corporation standard commercial agreement for the software. Unpublished rights reserved under the copyright laws of the United States. If there is any software on removable media described in this documentation, it is furnished under a license agreement included with the product as a separate document, in the hardcopy documentation, or on the removable media in a directory file named LICENSE.TXT. If you are unable to locate a copy, please contact 3Com and a copy will be sent to you. Federal Communications Commission Notice This equipment was tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case you must correct the interference at your own expense. Canadian Emissions Requirements This Class A digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian Interference-Causing Equipment Regulations. Cet appareil numérique de la classe A respecte toutes les exigences du Règlement sur le matériel brouilleur du Canada. EMC Directive Compliance This equipment was tested and conforms to the Council Directive 89/336/EEC for electromagnetic compatibility. Conformity with this directive is based upon compliance with the following harmonized standards: EN 55022 – Limits and Methods of Measurement of Radio Interference EN 50082-1 – Electromagnetic Compatibility Generic Immunity Standard: Residential, Commercial, and Light Industry Warning: This is a Class A product. In a domestic environment, this product may cause radio interference, in which case you may be required to take adequate measures. Compliance with this directive depends on the use of shielded cables. Low Voltage Directive Compliance This equipment was tested and conforms to the Council Directive 72/23/EEC for safety of electrical equipment. Conformity with this directive is based upon compliance with the following harmonized standard: EN 60950 – Safety of Information Technology Equipment ii
  3. 3. VCCI Class 1 Compliance This equipment is in the 1st Class category (information equipment to be used in commercial or industrial areas) and conforms to the standards set by the Voluntary Control Council for Interference by Information Technology Equipment aimed at preventing radio interference in commercial or industrial areas. Consequently, when the equipment is used in a residential area or in an adjacent area, radio interference may be caused to radio and TV receivers, and so on. Read the instructions for correct handling. Fiber Cable Classification Notice Use this equipment only with fiber cable classified by Underwriters Laboratories as to fire and smoke characteristics in accordance with Section 770-2(b) and Section 725-2(b) of the National Electrical Code. UK General Approval Statement The CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System Hub and ONline System Concentrator are manufactured to the International Safety Standard EN 60950 and are approved in the U.K. under the General Approval Number NS/G/12345/J/100003 for indirect connection to the public telecommunication network. Trademarks Unless otherwise indicated, 3Com registered trademarks are registered in the United States and may or may not be registered in other countries. 3Com, Boundary Routing, CardFacts, EtherLink, LANplex, LANsentry, LinkBuilder, NETBuilder, NETBuilder II, NetFacts, Parallel Tasking, SmartAgent, TokenDisk, TokenLink, Transcend, TriChannel, and ViewBuilder are registered trademarks of 3Com Corporation. 3TECH, CELLplex, CoreBuilder, EtherDisk, EtherLink II, FDDILink, MultiProbe, NetProbe, and ONline are trademarks of 3Com Corporation. 3ComFacts is a service mark of 3Com Corporation. The 3Com Multichannel Architecture Communications System is registered under U.S. Patent Number 5,301,303. AT&T is a registered trademark of American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Banyan and VINES are registered trademarks of Banyan Systems Inc. CompuServe is a registered trademark of CompuServe, Inc. DEC, DECnet, DELNI, POLYCENTER, VAX, VT100, VT220, and the Digital logo are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation. Hayes is a registered trademark of Hayes Microcomputer Products. OpenView is a registered trademark of Hewlett-Packard Company. Intel is a registered trademark of Intel Corporation. AIX, IBM, and NetView are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation. Microsoft, MS-DOS, Windows, Windows 95, and Windows NT are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. V30 is a trademark of NEC Corporation. NetWare and Novell are registered trademarks of Novell, Incorporated. IPX is a trademark of Novell, Incorporated. OSF and OSF/Motif are registered trademarks of Open Software Foundation, Inc. ONC, OpenWindows, Solaris, Solstice, Sun, Sun Microsystems, SunNet Manager, and SunOS are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. iii
  4. 4. SPARCstation is a trademark licensed exclusively to Sun Microsystems Inc. OPEN LOOK is a registered trademark of Unix System Laboratories, Inc. UNIX is a registered trademark of X/Open Company, Ltd. in the United States and other countries. Other brand and product names may be registered trademarks or trademarks of their respective holders. iv
  5. 5. CONTENTS ABOUT THIS GUIDE Introduction 1 Audience 1 How to Use This Guide 2 Conventions 2 Related Documents 4 3Com Documents 4 Reference Documents 4 1 INTRODUCTION Router Module Overview 1-1 Router Functions 1-1 Module Architecture 1-2 Router Models 1-3 Typical Applications 1-4 Router Module Features 1-6 FDDI Support 1-6 WAN Support 1-6 Protocol Translation 1-7 Scalable Protocol Support 1-7 WAN Optimization 1-9 ATM Migration 1-9 Management Support 1-9 Distributed, Scalable Reliability 1-10 Hot Swap Capability 1-10
  6. 6. 2 INSTALLING THE MODULE Precautionary Procedures 2-1 Quick Installation 2-2 Unpacking Procedures 2-2 Preparing to Install the Router Module 2-4 Restoring Base Board Positions 2-4 Verifying CPU Board Positions 2-5 Installing the Router Module 2-5 Making NIM Connections 2-7 Making FDDI NIM Connections 2-7 Connecting the Multi-Mode, Dual Attachment Station NIM 2-7 Connecting the Multi-Mode, Single Attachment Station NIM 2-8 Connecting the Multi-Mode Optical Bypass Switch 2-9 Connecting the Single Mode, Dual Attachment Station NIM 2-10 Making Quad Serial NIM Connections 2-11 Making ATM NIM Connections 2-12 ATM Connector Types 2-12 ATM Distance Limitations 2-12 3 CONFIGURING THE MODULE Configuration Overview 3-1 Attaching a Management Terminal 3-2 Connecting to the Console Port 3-2 Connecting to the Auxiliary Port 3-3 Configuring the Cisco NIM Connections 3-3 Configuring Cisco Parameters 3-3 Setting General Interface Parameters 3-4 Setting Token Ring Speed 3-4 Configuring 3Com Parameters 3-5 4 MONITORING OPERATION Monitoring Router Module LEDs 4-1 Common Front Panel LEDs 4-2 FDDI NIM LEDs 4-6 Quad Serial NIM LEDs 4-7 ATM NIM LEDs 4-9 vi
  7. 7. Displaying the Router Module Configuration 4-10 Using the SHOW MODULE Command 4-11 Using the SHOW MODULE VERBOSE Command 4-11 Using the SHOW PORT Command 4-11 Using the SHOW PORT VERBOSE Command 4-12 Interpreting the SHOW PORT Status Field 4-13 5 TROUBLESHOOTING Troubleshooting Startup Problems 5-1 Troubleshooting Network Connection Problems 5-2 Troubleshooting WAN Connection Problems 5-2 Correcting Operating Malfunctions 5-3 Recovering a Lost Password 5-4 A PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS General Specifications A-2 Electrical Specifications A-3 Environmental Specifications A-3 Mechanical Specifications A-3 B CABLING SPECIFICATIONS Console and Auxiliary Port Cables B-1 Console Port Pinouts B-2 Auxiliary Port Pinouts B-2 Quad Serial NIM Cables B-3 EIA-530 DTE Synchronous Serial Cable Pinouts B-4 EIA-232 DTE and DCE Serial Cable Assembly and Pinouts (DB-25) B-5 EIA-449 DTE and DCE Serial Cable Assembly and Pinouts (DB-37) B-8 V.35 DTE and DCE Serial Cable Assembly and Pinouts B-10 X.21 DTE and DCE Serial Cable Pinouts (DB-15) B-13 vii
  8. 8. C VIRTUAL CONFIGURATION REGISTER VCR Tasks C-1 VCR Bit Definitions C-2 Boot Field C-2 Setting Boot Field Values C-3 Default Boot Filenames C-3 Break Function C-4 Internet Protocol Broadcast Address C-5 Engine Management Terminal Baud Rate C-5 Bootload Failure Response C-5 NVRAM Disable C-6 Changing VCR Settings C-6 Enabling Booting From Flash Memory C-7 D FDDI PRECAUTIONS FDDI Laser Safety Information D-1 Processing D-2 E TECHNICAL SUPPORT Online Technical Services E-1 World Wide Web Site E-2 3Com Bulletin Board Service E-2 Access by Analog Modem E-2 Access by Digital Modem E-2 3ComFacts Automated Fax Service E-3 3ComForum on CompuServe Online Service E-3 Support From Your Network Supplier E-4 Support From 3Com Corporation E-5 Returning Products for Repair E-6 Accessing the 3Com MIB E-6 Contacting 3Com Technical Publications E-7 INDEX 3COM CORPORATION LIMITED WARRANTY viii
  9. 9. FIGURES 1-1 CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module 1-2 1-2 Quad Serial Network Router Module Typical Application 1-4 1-3 ATM OC3 Network Router Module Typical Application 1-4 1-4 Dual Attachment FDDI Network Router Module Typical Application 1-5 2-1 Locating the Spacing Clips 2-3 2-2 Base Board DIP Switch and Jumper Plug Positions 2-4 2-3 CPU Board Jumper Plug Positions 2-5 2-4 CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module in a CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System Hub 2-6 2-5 Multi-Mode FDDI Network Interface Connector, MIC Type 2-7 2-6 Making Connections to the FDDI MM, DAS NIM 2-8 2-7 Making Connections to the FDDI MM, SAS NIM 2-8 2-8 Connecting the Multi-Mode Optical Bypass Switch 2-9 2-9 Making Connections to the FDDI SM, DAS NIM 2-10 2-10 Making Connections to the Quad Serial NIM 2-11 2-11 Making Connections to the ATM NIMs 2-12 4-1 Common Front Panel LEDs 4-2 4-2 FDDI NIM LEDs 4-6 4-3 Quad Serial NIM LEDs 4-7 4-4 ATM NIM LEDs 4-9 4-5 SHOW MODULE Command Information 4-11 4-6 SHOW MODULE VERBOSE Command Information 4-11 4-7 SHOW PORT Command Information 4-12 4-8 SHOW PORT VERBOSE Command Information 4-12 B-1 EIA-530 Cable Assembly B-4 B-2 EIA-232 Serial Cable Assembly B-5 B-3 EIA-449 Serial Cable Assembly B-8 B-4 V.35 Serial Cable Assembly B-10 B-5 X.21 Cable Assembly B-13 D-1 Required Class 1 Laser Product Label D-2 ix
  10. 10. TABLES 1 How to Use This Guide 2 2 Graphic Conventions 2 3 Text Conventions 3 1-1 Software Feature Sets 1-8 2-1 Quick Installation Steps 2-2 2-2 ATM Distance Limitations 2-13 4-1 Front Panel LED Definitions 4-3 4-2 Quad Serial NIM LED Definitions 4-8 4-3 ATM NIM LED Definitions 4-10 4-4 SHOW PORT Status Field Definitions 4-13 5-1 Troubleshooting Malfunctions 5-3 A-1 General Router Module Specifications A-2 A-2 Electrical Router Module Specifications A-3 A-3 Environmental Router Module Specifications A-3 A-4 Mechanical Router Module Specifications A-3 B-1 Console Port Pinout Specification B-2 B-2 Auxiliary Port Pinout Specification B-2 B-3 EIA-530 Cable Pinout Specifications B-4 B-4 EIA-232 DTE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to DB-25) B-6 B-5 EIA-232 DCE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to DB-25) B-7 B-6 EIA-449 DTE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to DB-37) B-8 B-7 EIA-449 DCE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to DB-37) B-9 B-8 V.35 DTE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to Winchester-Type 34-Pin) B-11 B-9 V.35 DCE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to Winchester-Type 34-Pin) B-12 B-10 X.21 DTE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to DB-15) B-13 B-11 X.21 DCE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to DB-15) B-14 C-1 Virtual Configuration Register Bit Values C-2 C-2 Boot Field Values (Configuration Register Bits 00 to 03) C-2 C-3 Default Boot Filenames C-4 C-4 Broadcast Address Destination Settings C-5 C-5 Engine Management Terminal Baud Rate Settings C-5 xi
  11. 11. ABOUT THIS GUIDE Introduction This guide describes how to install, configure, and monitor the 3Com CoreBuilder™ 5000 Network Router Module. If the information in the release notes shipped with your product differs from the information in this guide, follow the release note instructions. Audience This guide is intended for the following people at your site: s Network manager or administrator s Trained hardware installer or service personnel
  12. 12. 2 ABOUT THIS GUIDE How to Use This Table 1 shows the location of specific information. Guide Table 1 How to Use This Guide If you are looking for: Turn to: General information about the router module Chapter 1 Description of the router module architecture Typical applications of the router module Features of the router module Procedures for unpacking and preparing to install the router Chapter 2 module Procedures for installing the router module Procedures for making NIM connections An overview of the router module configuration process Chapter 3 Procedures for attaching a management terminal Procedures for configuring the Cisco NIM connections Procedures for configuring Cisco parameters Procedures for configuring 3Com parameters Information for monitoring router module LEDs Chapter 4 Procedures for displaying the router module configuration Information on troubleshooting the router module Chapter 5 Procedures for recovering a lost password Module specifications, cable requirements, and other reference Appendices A-E information Conventions Table 2 and Table 3 list conventions used throughout this guide. Table 2 Graphic Conventions Icon Type Description Information Information notes call attention to important features Note or instructions. Caution Cautions alert you to personal safety risk, system damage, or loss of data. Warning Warnings alert you to the risk of severe personal injury.
  13. 13. Conventions 3 Table 3 Text Conventions Convention Description Enter vs. Type When the word enter is used in this guide, it means type something, then press the Return or Enter key. Do not press the Return or Enter key when instructed to type. Syntax vs. Command Syntax indicates that the general form of a command syntax is provided. You must evaluate the syntax and supply the appropriate port, path, value, address, or string. For example: Enable RIPIP by using the following syntax: SETDefault !<port> -RIPIP CONTrol = Listen In this example, you must supply a port number for !<port>. Command indicates that all variables in the command have been supplied and you can enter the command as shown in text. For example: Remove the IP address by entering the following command: SETDefault !0 -IP NETaddr = 0.0.0.0 For consistency and clarity, the full-form syntax (upper- and lowercase letters) is provided. However, you can enter the abbreviated form of a command by typing only the uppercase portion and supplying the appropriate port, path, address, value, and so on. You can enter the command in either upper- or lowercase letters at the prompt. Text represented as This typeface is used to represent displays that screen display appear on your terminal screen. For example: NetLogin: Text represented as This typeface is used to represent commands that commands you enter. For example: SETDefault !0 -IP NETaddr = 0.0.0.0 Keys Specific keys are referred to in the text as Return key or Escape key, or they may be shown as [Return] or [Esc]. If two or more keys are to be pressed simultaneously, the keys are linked with a plus sign (+). For example: Press [Ctrl]+[Alt]+[Del]. Italics Italics are used to denote new terms or emphasis.
  14. 14. 4 ABOUT THIS GUIDE Related Documents This section provides information on supporting documentation, including: s 3Com Documents s Reference Documents 3Com Documents The following documents provide additional information on 3Com products: CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System Hub Installation and Operation Guide – Provides information on the installation, operation, and configuration of the CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System Hub. This guide also describes the principal features of the CoreBuilder 5000 Fault-Tolerant Controller Module. CoreBuilder 5000 Distributed Management Module User Guide – Provides information on the CoreBuilder 5000 Distributed Management Module’s operation, installation, and configuration. This guide also describes the software commands associated with the Distributed Management Module. CoreBuilder 5000 Distributed Management Module Commands Guide – Describes each management command by providing details on command format and use. For a complete list of 3Com documents, contact your 3Com representative. Reference Documents The following documents supply related background information: Case, J., Fedor, M., Scoffstall, M., and J. Davin, The Simple Network Management Protocol, RFC 1157, University of Tennessee at Knoxville, Performance Systems International and the MIT Laboratory for Computer Science, May 1990. Rose, M., and K. McCloghrie, Structure and Identification of Management Information for TCP/IP-based Internets, RFC 1155, Performance Systems International and Hughes LAN Systems, May 1990.
  15. 15. INTRODUCTION 1 This chapter contains the following topics: s Router Module Overview s Router Module Features Router Module The 3Com CoreBuilder™ 5000 Network Router Module is a Overview multiprotocol backplane router that operates in a 3Com® CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System. This section describes the following topics: s Router Functions s Module Architecture s Router Models s Typical Applications Router Functions The CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module (referred to in this guide as the router module) is designed to: s Provide the physical network interface to connect local- and wide-area networks in multiprotocol environments s Run standard Cisco Systems® Internetworking Operating System® (IOS) router software s Provide high-performance, fault-tolerant connectivity to backbone networks for Token Ring local area networks (LANs) within the CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System s Deliver standards-based translation bridging and multiprotocol routing capability
  16. 16. 1-2 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION s Internetwork Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), Fiber Data Distributed Interface (FDDI), or wide area network (WAN) connections with four Token Ring backplane networks s Support the CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System backplane for connectivity to 4 of 10 CoreBuilder 5000 Token Ring backplane networks s Act as the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) agent for in-band or out-of-band management by any SNMP-compliant network management application or the 3Com Transcend® Enterprise Manager Module Architecture The router module (Figure 1-1) occupies three slots in the CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System. Base board (integrated NIMs 2 and 3) Network Interface Module (optional NIM 1) Faceplate CPU board Figure 1-1 CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module
  17. 17. Router Module Overview 1-3 The base router module consists of a CoreBuilder 5000 14-inch base board with an attached CPU board. Both the base board and the CPU board plug directly into the CoreBuilder 5000 backplane. The base router module provides four Token Ring backplane connections (complex port connections), any one of which you can connect to any one of 10 CoreBuilder 5000 backplane networks. The Token Ring ports are equivalent to Cisco Systems IOS interface connections. You can connect only one Token Ring backplane connection to any one CoreBuilder 5000 backplane network. You can mount any one of multiple standard Cisco Systems Network Interface Module (NIM) types on the base board to provide additional routing connections (Cisco Systems NPM connections) for various protocol types (see Figure 1-1). Each NIM type requires a unique 3Com faceplate. Router Models The router module is available in the following configurations: Base – Includes 4 Token Ring backplane connections. FDDI MM, DAS – Multi-mode, dual attachment station/4 Token Ring backplane connections. FDDI MM, SAS – Multi-mode, single attachment station/4 Token Ring backplane connections. FDDI SM, DAS – Single mode, dual attachment station/4 Token Ring backplane connections. Quad Serial – 4 synchronous serial/4 Token Ring backplane connections. ATM OC3, MM – Multi-mode fiber optic cable (OC3)/4 Token Ring backplane connections ATM OC3, SM – Single mode fiber, optic cable (OC3)/4 Token Ring backplane connections
  18. 18. 1-4 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION Typical Applications Figure 1-2, Figure 1-3, and Figure 1-4 show typical applications of the Quad Serial, ATM OC3, and FDDI router modules. Local site A Remote site B 3Com Edge Router Module Dedicated or dial-up synchronous serial connections 4th floor Remote site C 3Com Edge Router Module 3rd floor CoreBuilder 5000 Remote site D Network Router Module 2nd floor 3Com Edge Router Module 1st floor Remote site E 3Com Edge Router Module Figure 1-2 Quad Serial Network Router Module Typical Application Local site A 4th floor Ethernet ATM OC-3 MM CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module 3rd floor CoreBuilder 5000 ATM OC-3 MM ATM Service Network Router Module 2nd floor Token Ring CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module 1st floor Figure 1-3 ATM OC3 Network Router Module Typical Application
  19. 19. Router Module Overview 1-5 Building B To other sites CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module Building A 4th floor FDDI campus backbone 3rd floor dual-attachment, multi-mode or single mode CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module 2nd floor Building C 1st floor To other sites CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module Figure 1-4 Dual Attachment FDDI Network Router Module Typical Application
  20. 20. 1-6 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION Router Module This section describes the following features of the router module: Features s FDDI Support s WAN Support s Protocol Translation s Scalable Protocol Support s WAN Optimization s ATM Migration s Management Support s Distributed, Scalable Reliability s Hot Swap Capability FDDI Support The router module provides support for three FDDI configurations on the following two FDDI interfaces: Multi-Mode Fiber – Can support distances of up to 2 km for both Class A Dual Attachment Stations (DAS) and Class B Single Attachment Stations (SAS). Single Mode Fiber – Can support distances of up to 10 km for Class A Dual Attachment Stations (DAS). The FDDI interfaces also include a connector for attachment to an external optical bypass unit. If the router module stops operating, the optical bypass unit ensures that the FDDI signal bypasses that router. The FDDI ring and other stations remain operational. WAN Support The router module configured with a Quad Serial NIM provides four synchronous serial ports to support backbone or redundant network connections over the wide area network (WAN). The serial ports support the following connection protocols: s V.35 s EIA-232 s EIA-449 s RS-422 s X.21
  21. 21. Router Module Features 1-7 Each serial port is capable of providing T1/E1 rate connectivity. Each port operates in full duplex mode at speeds from 1,200 bits per second (bps) to 2,048 Megabits per second (Mbps). You can configure the synchronous serial ports to support IBM ® Synchronous Data Link Control (SDLC) traffic using synchronous pass through or Data Link Switching (DLSw). Protocol Translation The router module protocol translation function allows you to extend the life of your existing network devices. The router module allows networks operating in dissimilar protocol environments to communicate while managing up to 180 simultaneous sessions. The router module supports the following bidirectional translations: s X.25 to TCP s X.25 to Local Area Transport (LAT) s X.25 to XRemote devices s LAT to TCP s LAT to TN3270 devices Scalable Protocol Each router module type allows you to select a specific level of protocol Support support to best match the needs of your application. Four Cisco IOS router software feature sets offer an increasing level of protocol support: IP/IPX – The base feature set is used in applications requiring only IP/IPX protocols. Desktop – Provides additional LAN support for use in applications with limited LAN protocol requirements. Desktop plus IBM – Adds IBM support. Enterprise – Adds top-level protocol support, including SNA (Synchronous Network Architecture) integration.
  22. 22. 1-8 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION Table 1-1 details the specific protocol support offered in each feature set. Table 1-1 Software Feature Sets Feature Features Included in Each Feature Set Category IP/IPX Desktop Desktop plus IBM Enterprise LAN Support IP, Bridging, IP, Bridging, IP, Bridging, LAN IP, Bridging, LAN LAN LAN Extension, Extension, Host Extension, Host Extension, Host Software, Software, Novell IPX, Software, Novell IPX, Host Novell IPX, DECnet IV, DECnet IV, AppleTalk Software, DECnet™ IV, AppleTalk Phase 1 Phase 1 and 2, DECnet Novell® IPX™ Appletalk® and 2 V, XNS, Banyan® Phase 1 and 2 VINES®, OSI, Apollo® Domain IBM Support SRB/RSRB, SRT, SRB/RSRB, SRT, DLSW+, SNA & DLSW+, SNA & NETBIOS™ WAN NETBIOS WAN optimization (with optimization (with local local acknowledgment, acknowledgment, caching, and filtering), caching, and SDLC integration, filtering), SDLC SDLC-to-LAN integration, conversion, SDLC SDLC-to-LAN Transport (STUN), conversion, SDLC Frame Relay SNA Transport (STUN), Support Frame Relay SNA (RFC 1490)TG/COS, Support (RFC 1490) QLLC, DSPU Concentration Protocol X.25-to-TCP, Translation X.25-to-LAT, and X.25-to-XRemote; LAT-to-TCP and LAT-to-TN3279 (bidirectional) IP Routing RIP, OSPF, RIP, OSPF, PIM, RIP, OSPF, PIM, RIP, OSPF, PIM, NHRP, PIM, NHRP NHRP, BGP, NHRP, BGP, EGP, BGP, EGP, IGRP, EGP, IGRP™ IGRP, Enhanced IGRP Enhanced IGRP, ES-IS, IS-IS WAN Services HDLC, PPP, X.25, Frame Relay, ISDN, SMDS, IPXWAN 2.0, ATM WAN Header and link compression, X.25 packet payload compression, Optimization dial-on-demand, dial backup, bandwidth-on-demand, custom and priority queuing, access lists, access security, snapshot routing Network Autoinstall, SNMP, TELNET Management
  23. 23. Router Module Features 1-9 WAN Optimization The router module provides the following features to help limit network operating costs by optimizing WAN network connections: Dial-On-Demand Routing – A more economical alternative to a second leased line as backup, a dial-on-demand backup dials up a second line automatically if the primary WAN link fails. Data Compression – The router module provides four types of data compression for different network environments: s Link compression s X.25 packet payload compression s TCP/IP header compression s DEC™ LAT compression ATM Migration The router module can be upgraded to support your migration to an ATM backbone (see Figure 1-3). Add an ATM network backbone by replacing your original router module NIM, with one of two ATM NIM types: s OC-3, MM (Optical Carrier Type 3, Multi-Mode) s OC-3, SM (Optical Carrier Type 3, Single Mode) Each ATM NIM type provides 155 Mbps backbone bandwidth. Management The router module is shipped with a comprehensive Management Support Information Base (MIB) for using Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP), the industry standard for network management. You can monitor and control the router module from any SNMP-based management station, including the 3Com Transcend Enterprise Manager. In addition, the router module is fully compatible with CiscoWorks ® network management software from Cisco Systems. TELNET capability provides for direct access in-band to the agent, and a console port on the module provides for out-of-band management capability.
  24. 24. 1-10 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION Distributed, Scalable The router module operates in the CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System Reliability which is structured to eliminate any single point of failure. The CoreBuilder 5000 hub provides redundancy for power supplies, switched ports, controller modules, and the hub management module. Automatic switching to the redundant components ensures continuation of the specific function. 3Com fault-tolerant features are fully-scalable, allowing you to implement and alter the degree of fault-tolerance you need as your network grows. Hot Swap Capability The router module features “hot swap” capability. You can swap the router module in or out of (install or remove from) a powered-on CoreBuilder 5000 hub.
  25. 25. INSTALLING THE MODULE 2 This chapter contains the following sections: s Precautionary Procedures s Quick Installation s Unpacking Procedures s Preparing to Install the Router Module s Installing the Router Module s Making NIM Connections Precautionary CAUTION: Electrostatic discharge (ESD) can damage static-sensitive Procedures devices on circuit boards. Follow these precautions when you unpack or handle the router module: s Do not remove the board from its antistatic shielding bag until you are ready to inspect or install it. s Handle the board by the faceplate only. Use proper grounding techniques when you install the module, including: s Using a footstrap and grounded static mat or wearing a grounded static discharge wrist strap. s Touching the rack or other ground source just before you handle the module.
  26. 26. 2-2 CHAPTER 2: INSTALLING THE MODULE Quick Installation Table 2-1 outlines the steps for quick installation of the CoreBuilder™ 5000 Network Router Module. If you are familiar with installing CoreBuilder 5000 modules, use this table as a checklist. Otherwise, refer to the remainder of this chapter and to Chapters 3 and 4 to complete the installation. . Table 2-1 Quick Installation Steps Step Procedure Section Title/Page Number 1 Unpack the module. Unpacking Procedures on page 2-2 2 Prepare to install the module by verifying Preparing to Install the Router DIP switch and jumper plug positions. Module on page 2-4 3 Install the module into three contiguous Installing the Router Module slots in the CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated on page 2-5 System Hub. 4 Connect the NIM cables. Making NIM Connections on page 2-7 5 Attach a terminal to the console or auxiliary Attaching a Management ports. Terminal on page 3-2 6 Configure the NIM connections using Cisco Configuring the Cisco NIM IOS router configuration commands. Connections on page 3-3 7 Configure the Cisco router interfaces using Configuring Cisco Cisco IOS router configuration commands. Parameters on page 3-3 8 Configure the Token Ring backplane Configuring 3Com connections using DMM software. Parameters on page 3-5 9 Monitor initial router module operation. Monitoring Router Module LEDs on page 4-1 For information about potential problems, refer to the troubleshooting techniques described in Chapter 5, Troubleshooting. Unpacking To unpack the CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module: Procedures 1 Verify that the module is the model you ordered by checking the model number listed on the side of the shipping carton. The product model number listed on the box contains the prefix “3C9.”
  27. 27. Unpacking Procedures 2-3 2 Remove the module, in its antistatic bag, from the shipping carton. 3 Remove the module from the antistatic shielding bag and inspect it for damage. CAUTION: Always handle the module by the faceplate, being careful not to touch the components. If the module appears to be damaged, return it to the antistatic shielding bag, repack it in the shipping carton, and contact your local supplier. Keep the shipping carton and the antistatic shielding bag in which your module was shipped so that you can repackage the module for storage or shipment. 4 Remove the spacing clips from the router module (Figure 2-1). Spacing clips Figure 2-1 Locating the Spacing Clips
  28. 28. 2-4 CHAPTER 2: INSTALLING THE MODULE CAUTION: The spacing clips on the CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module are used only to protect the module during shipping. You must manually remove the spacing clips before you install the module. Failure to remove the spacing clips before installation could result in damage to the CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System Hub. Preparing to Install This section includes information to allow you to restore correct DIP the Router Module switch and jumper plug positions on the base and CPU boards if the positions are inadvertently altered. If you believe the default positions have been altered, refer to the following sections: s Restoring Base Board Positions s Verifying CPU Board Positions Restoring Base Do not attempt to configure the DIP switches and jumper plugs on the Board Positions base board. However, if you suspect that the DIP switch or jumper plug positions have been altered, restore them to the positions shown in Figure 2-2. . Jumper plug positions empty Plug inserted in bottom All DIP switch position positions on On Figure 2-2 Base Board DIP Switch and Jumper Plug Positions
  29. 29. Installing the Router Module 2-5 Verifying CPU Board Do not attempt to configure the jumper plugs on the CPU board. Positions However, if you suspect that the jumper plug positions have been altered, restore them to the positions shown in Figure 2-3. . Plugs not inserted Plug inserted in bottom position Plug inserted Figure 2-3 CPU Board Jumper Plug Positions Installing the This section describes how to install the router module in the Router Module CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System Hub. You do not need to power off the hub to install or remove the router module. You can insert the module while the hub is operating (hot swap capability). To install the router module: 1 Properly ground yourself prior to handling the module. Put on a static wrist guard or touch a grounded static mat before you handle the module. 2 Locate 3 adjacent open slots in the hub, or remove panels on the hub to expose 3 slots for the router module.
  30. 30. 2-6 CHAPTER 2: INSTALLING THE MODULE 3 Insert the router module into the board guides at the top and bottom of the slot and slide it into the hub by pressing firmly at the top and bottom of the faceplate. Make sure that the module ejectors are open fully when you insert the module and that the connectors are well-seated into the backplane of the hub. Figure 2-4 shows a router module being installed in a CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System Hub. Spring-loaded screws Ejector (opened) CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module Ejector Spring-loaded screws Figure 2-4 CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module in a CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System Hub To minimize electromagnetic interference, ensure that the slots adjacent to the router module are occupied or have blank panels installed. 4 Push the module ejectors closed. 5 Using your fingers, tighten the spring-loaded screws on the front of the router module faceplate (do not overtighten).
  31. 31. Making NIM Connections 2-7 Making NIM This section provides guidelines for making NIM (Network Interface Connections Module) network cable connections. This section describes the following topics: s Making FDDI NIM Connections s Making Quad Serial NIM Connections s Making ATM NIM Connections Making FDDI NIM This section provides information on the following topics: Connections s Connecting the Multi-Mode, Dual Attachment Station NIM s Connecting the Multi-Mode, Single Attachment Station NIM s Connecting the Multi-Mode Optical Bypass Switch s Connecting the Single Mode, Dual Attachment Station NIM Connecting the Multi-Mode, Dual Attachment Station NIM The Multi-Mode, Dual Attachment Station NIM (MM, DAS) connectors are Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) standard physical sublayer (PHY) connectors. The media interface connector (MIC) connects to FDDI-standard 62.5/125 micron multi-mode fiber optic cable. Figure 2-5 shows the MIC connector typically used for network and chassis connections in multi-mode FDDI applications. H1738 Figure 2-5 Multi-Mode FDDI Network Interface Connector, MIC Type A dual attachment station requires two connections, one to the primary ring and one to the secondary ring. On the FDDI MM, DAS NIM, the PHY-A port is the left port and PHY-B is the right port. Figure 2-6 shows how to connect a FDDI MM, DAS router module to another Dual Attachment Station.
  32. 32. 2-8 CHAPTER 2: INSTALLING THE MODULE PHY-A PHY-B PHY-B Dual Attachment Station (DAS) PHY-A Figure 2-6 Making Connections to the FDDI MM, DAS NIM To connect the FDDI MM, DAS NIM to another Dual Attachment Station: 1 Connect PHY-A on the router module to PHY-B on the other DAS. 2 Connect PHY-B on the router module to PHY-A on the other DAS. Connecting the Multi-Mode, Single Attachment Station NIM Connect the Single Attachment router module’s PHY-A port through a concentrator to a Single Attachment ring (Figure 2-7). PHY-A To concentrator Figure 2-7 Making Connections to the FDDI MM, SAS NIM
  33. 33. Making NIM Connections 2-9 You can also connect the FDDI MM, SAS router module directly to another device in a point-to-point configuration. Connecting the Multi-Mode Optical Bypass Switch The Multi-Mode FDDI router modules provide an optical bypass capability that automatically drops the router module from the FDDI ring if the module fails. Dropping the module from the ring ensures that the ring remains available to the other stations. Figure 2-8 shows how to connect an optical bypass switch (not included with the CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module) to the FDDI MM, DAS NIM. Optical bypass switch Optical bypass interface cable To ring DIN connector Bypass operation Figure 2-8 Connecting the Multi-Mode Optical Bypass Switch To connect the FDDI MM, DAS NIM to an optical bypass switch: 1 Connect PHY-A on the router module to PHY-B on the optical bypass switch. 2 Connect PHY-B on the router module to PHY-A on the optical bypass switch. 3 Connect one end of the optical bypass interface cable to the 6-pin Deutsche Industrie-Norm (DIN) connector on the optical bypass switch. 4 Connect the other end of the optical bypass interface cable to the 6-pin DIN connector on the router module.
  34. 34. 2-10 CHAPTER 2: INSTALLING THE MODULE Connecting the Single Mode, Dual Attachment Station NIM A dual attachment, single mode module configuration requires two connections: one to the primary ring and one to the secondary ring. Figure 2-9 shows how to connect a FDDI SM, DAS router module to another Dual Attachment Station. FC connector type To primary ring To secondary ring From primary ring From secondary ring Figure 2-9 Making Connections to the FDDI SM, DAS NIM To connect the FDDI SM, DAS NIM to another Dual Attachment Station: 1 Connect one end of an FC connector cable to the PHY-A XMTR connector on the router module. 2 Connect the other end of the FC connector cable to the primary ring RCVR connector on the other DAS. 3 Connect one end of a second FC connector cable to the PHY-A RCVR connector on the router module. 4 Connect the other end of the second FC connector cable to the primary ring XMTR connector on the other DAS. 5 Connect one end of a third FC connector cable to the PHY-B XMTR connector on the router module. 6 Connect the other end of the third FC connector cable to the secondary ring RCVR connector on the other DAS. 7 Connect one end of a fourth FC connector cable to the PHY-B RCVR connector on the router module. 8 Connect the other end of the fourth FC connector cable to the secondary ring XMTR connector on the other DAS.
  35. 35. Making NIM Connections 2-11 Making Quad Serial The Quad Serial NIM has four synchronous serial ports with custom NIM Connections DB-60 connectors. When setting up your serial port connections, consider distance limitations and potential electromagnetic interference (EMI) as defined in the Electronics Industries Association (EIA) and Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) standards, such as standard EIA/TIA-232. Figure 2-10 shows how to connect the Quad Serial NIM from any one serial port on the router module to a modem or other communications device. Custom 60-pin Serial transmission cable connector EIA/TIA-232, EIA/TIA-449, V.35, X.21 or EIA-530 Connector Modem or other communications device Figure 2-10 Making Connections to the Quad Serial NIM Be careful to insert the DB-60 connector correctly to prevent damage to the connector pins. To connect the Quad Serial NIM, attach each serial port from the custom 60-pin connector to a modem or other DCE device using one of the following standard device cable connectors: s EIA/TIA-232 s EIA/TIA-449 s EIA-530 s V.35 s X.21
  36. 36. 2-12 CHAPTER 2: INSTALLING THE MODULE Making ATM NIM This section provides information on the following topics: Connections s ATM Connector Types s ATM Distance Limitations ATM Connector Types Each ATM NIM type requires a specific connector (Figure 2-11): OC-3 MM NIM – Requires a multi-mode SC-type connector. OC-3 SM NIM – Requires a single mode SC-type connector. SC-type connector for ATM OC-3 SM NIM SC-type connector for ATM OC-3 MM NIM Figure 2-11 Making Connections to the ATM NIMs ATM Distance Limitations The SONET (Synchronous Optical Network) specification for fiber-optic transmission defines two types of fiber: s single mode s multimode Single-mode fiber is capable of higher bandwidth and greater cable run distances than multimode fiber.
  37. 37. Making NIM Connections 2-13 The typical maximum distances for single-mode and multimode transmissions, as defined by the SONET, are provided in Table 2-2. If you connect two optical devices at a distance greater than those specified in Table 2-2, significant signal loss could occur, making transmission unreliable. Table 2-2 ATM Distance Limitations Fiber Type Maximum Distance Between Stations Single mode Up to 9 miles (15 kilometers) Multimode Up to 1.5 miles (3 kilometers)
  38. 38. CONFIGURING THE MODULE 3 This chapter contains the following topics: s Configuration Overview s Attaching a Management Terminal s Configuring the Cisco NIM Connections s Configuring Cisco Parameters s Configuring 3Com Parameters CAUTION: Throughout this chapter, Cisco nomenclature refers to the four Token Ring backplane connections as interfaces 0, 1, 2, and 3. 3Com refers to the same four router connections as ports 1, 2, 3, and 4. For example, when configuring the router module, Cisco interface 0 is equivalent to 3Com port 1. Configuration The following list is an overview of the procedures that are required Overview configure the router module. For more detail, refer to sections that follow. CAUTION: Failure to follow the configuration sequence specified in this section could result in error messages at the router management terminal during the configuration procedure. For best results, use the procedure as outlined in the sections that follow. To configure the router module: 1 Attach a Management Terminal – Attach a management terminal to the console port of the router module. 2 Configure the Cisco NIM Connections – From the management terminal, use Cisco router configuration commands to configure the NIM (Network Interface Module) connections.
  39. 39. 3-2 CHAPTER 3: CONFIGURING THE MODULE 3 Configure the Cisco Parameters – Use the management terminal to configure the four Cisco router interfaces, including interface speed. 4 Configure the 3Com Parameters – Use the management terminal that is connected to the 3Com® CoreBuilder 5000 Distributed Management Module (DMM) to configure the four 3Com router ports, including CoreBuilder™ 5000 backplane network speed. Each of these steps is detailed in the sections that follow. If you are using the router module in an unmanaged hub (one in which a DMM module is not installed), upon power on, the router module uses the last module configuration saved in NVRAM. To disable NVRAM configuration, set DIP switch 5 to Off (see Figure 2-2). When you power on the router module with NVRAM configuration disabled, the four Token Ring ports are set to isolated mode. Attaching a This section provides information on attaching a terminal to the console Management or auxiliary ports of the router module for use as a Cisco management Terminal terminal. You must use the console port for initial router configuration. After you configure the router, you can use the auxiliary port for an asynchronous serial connection. Connecting to the All router modules include an asynchronous router console port (female Console Port DB-25 connector) wired as a data communications equipment (DCE) device. The port requires a straight-through cable for connection to a local terminal. The port uses the following default parameters: s 9600 baud s 8 data bits s No parity generated or checked s 2 stop bits
  40. 40. Configuring the Cisco NIM Connections 3-3 Connecting to the All router modules include a male DB-25 connector auxiliary port Auxiliary Port (labeled AUX PORT DTE). The auxiliary port is a shared-memory data terminal equipment (DTE) port to which you can attach an EIA/TIA-232 connector from a channel service unit/data service unit (CSU/DSU), a modem, or protocol analyzer for network access. Console and auxiliary port cabling requirements are provided in Appendix B, Cabling Specifications. Configuring the From the Cisco management terminal, use Cisco IOS routing Cisco NIM configuration commands to configure the FDDI or Quad Serial NIM Connections connections. If you are configuring a base router module without a NIM installed (Model Number 6701CS-NN), proceed to the next section Configuring Cisco Parameters. You may receive status messages referring to NIM 1, NIM 2, and NIM 3. Cisco IOS makes the following NIM designations: s Optional NIM as NIM 1 s Token Ring backplane interfaces 0 and 1 (3Com ports 1 and 2) as NIM 2 s Token Ring backplane interfaces 2 and 3 (3Com ports 3 and 4) as NIM 3 For detailed information on Cisco IOS routing configuration commands, refer to the Cisco hardcopy documentation set (Part Number 17-00138-MS) or to the Cisco documentation set on the Cisco UniverCD™ CD-ROM (Part Number 17-00138-CD). Configuring Cisco This section outlines procedures for configuring Cisco parameters for Parameters the four Token Ring interface connections on the router module using Cisco IOS software management commands. The procedures include: s Setting General Interface Parameters s Setting Token Ring Speed
  41. 41. 3-4 CHAPTER 3: CONFIGURING THE MODULE Setting General Set any required general Cisco parameters for the four router Interface Parameters interfaces. Cisco Systems IOS software provides management commands for configuring routing interface connections. Refer to the Cisco hardcopy documentation set (Part Number 17-00138-MS) or to the Cisco documentation set on the Cisco UniverCD CD-ROM (Part Number 17-00138-CD). Setting Token Ring Set the Token Ring speed of each router interface connection to match Speed the speed of the CoreBuilder 5000 backplane network to which it will be connected. To set the Token Ring speed of a router interface: 1 Use DMM at the CoreBuilder 5000 management station to ensure that the router interface port is in isolated mode: CB5000> set port 7.1 network isolated Port 07.01 network id set to ISOLATED. 2 At the router management terminal, set the configuration mode to enable: Router> enable 3 Enter the required password: Password:**** 4 Set the router management terminal to configuration mode: Router# config terminal Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z. Router(config)# 5 Specify the number of the Token Ring interface: Router(config)# interface tokenring 0 Router(config-if)# 6 Shut down the router interface: Router(config-if)# shutdown Router(config-if)# 7 Specify the ring speed of the router interface (in this example, 4 MBPS): Router(config-if)# ring-speed 4 Router(config-if)#
  42. 42. Configuring 3Com Parameters 3-5 8 Remove the router interface from shutdown state: Router(config-if)# no shutdown Router(config-if)# 9 Exit from configuration mode: Router(config-if)# ^Z Router# 10 Save the interface configuration changes: Router# write mem Building configuration... [OK] Router# At this point, the system may display a sequence of RESET messages on the router management terminal. This a normal, temporary condition that ends when the interface synchronizes to the new speed. Configuring 3Com This section outlines procedures for using DMM commands to Parameters configure basic parameters for the 3Com router module. Refer to the 3Com CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System Hub Installation and Operation Guide, Chapter 1, for a CoreBuilder 5000 backplane architecture description and to the 3Com DMM Commands Guide for detailed information on DMM configuration commands. To configure the 3Com router module: 1 Set the Token Ring speed of the targeted four CoreBuilder 5000 backplane networks. You must set the Token Ring speed of a backplane network to match the Token Ring speed of the Cisco interface you intend to connect to the backplane network. In the following example, Token Ring backplane network 9 is set to 4 Mbps, the same speed at which the Cisco interface port was set. CB5000> set network token_ring token_ring_9 ring_speed 4mbps Value set to 4 MBPS. 2 Connect each of the router ports to one of the 10 CoreBuilder 5000 backplane networks (or set the port to isolated mode).
  43. 43. 3-6 CHAPTER 3: CONFIGURING THE MODULE You cannot set more than one router port to any one backplane network. In the following example, 3Com router port 1 (Cisco interface 0) is set to backplane network 9: CB5000> set port 7.1 network token_ring_9 Port 07.01 network id set to TOKEN_RING_9. At this point, the system may display a sequence of RESET messages at the Cisco router management terminal. This is a normal, temporary condition that ends when the interface successfully connects to the backplane network. 3 Save the configuration: CB5000> save all Failure to save configuration settings may result in loss of configuration data.
  44. 44. MONITORING OPERATION 4 This chapter contains the following topics: s Monitoring Router Module LEDs s Displaying the Router Module Configuration Monitoring Router This section identifies the front panel LEDs of the CoreBuilder™ 5000 Module LEDs Network Router Module: s Common Front Panel LEDs s FDDI NIM LEDs s Quad Serial NIM LEDs s ATM NIM LEDs
  45. 45. 4-2 CHAPTER 4: MONITORING OPERATION Common Front Panel The front panel LEDs of the base model (without NIM) router module LEDs are common to all router module models. Figure 4-1 shows the common front panel LEDs. Table 4-1 describes the LEDs. Figure 4-1 Common Front Panel LEDs RESET is a recessed pushbutton that is used to reset the router module under certain conditions. Refer to Chapter 5, Troubleshooting, for more information on using the RESET button.
  46. 46. Monitoring Router Module LEDs 4-3 . Table 4-1 Front Panel LED Definitions LED Description Definition MOD STATUS Module Status ON – Indicates that 3Com router software is loaded and the router module is operational. OFF – Indicates that 3Com router software is not operational. NIM PRES NIM Present ON – Indicates that an optional NIM is installed on the router module. OFF – Indicates that an optional NIM is not installed on the router module. SYS RUN System Run ON – Indicates that Cisco IOS router software is loaded and operational. OFF – Indicates that Cisco IOS router software is not loaded and operational. LEDS NIM NIM 1 Data ON – Indicates that data traffic is present Present on one or more of the interfaces on the optional NIM. OFF – Indicates that data traffic is not present on any interfaces on the optional NIM. LEDS DTR A, B NIM 2 (Dual ON – Indicates that data traffic is present Token Ring A on one or both of Cisco interfaces 0 and 1 and B) Data (3Com ports 1 and 2). Present OFF – Indicates that data traffic is present on one or both of Cisco interfaces 0 and 1 (3Com ports 1 and 2). LEDS DTR C, D NIM 3(Dual ON – Indicates that data traffic is present Token Ring C on one or both of Cisco interfaces 2 and 3 and D) Data (3Com ports 3 and 4). Present OFF – Indicates that data traffic is present on one or both of Cisco interfaces 2 and 3 (3Com ports 3 and 4). HLTH NIM NIM 1 Healthy ON – Indicates that optional NIM 1 is operational and line protocol for the NIM interfaces is up. OFF – Indicates that the optional NIM 1 is not operational. HLTH DTR A, B NIM 2 (Dual ON – Indicates that Cisco interfaces 0 and 1 Token Ring A (3Com ports 1 and 2) are operational and and B) Healthy line protocol for the interfaces is up. OFF – Indicates that Cisco interfaces 0 and 1 (3Com ports 1 and 2) are not operational.
  47. 47. 4-4 CHAPTER 4: MONITORING OPERATION Table 4-1 Front Panel LED Definitions (continued) LED Description Definition HLTH DTR C, D NIM 3 (Dual ON – Indicates that Cisco interfaces 2 and 3 Token Ring A (3Com ports 3 and 4) are operational and and B) Healthy line protocol for the interfaces is up. OFF – Indicates that Cisco interfaces 2 and 3 (3Com ports 3 and 4) are not operational. 16 MBPS A Port 1 (Cisco ON – Indicates that port 1 (Cisco interface interface 0) set 0) is set to 16 Mbps. to 16 Mbps OFF – Indicates that port 1 (Cisco interface 0) is set to 4 Mbps or is not initialized. 16 MBPS B Port 2 (Cisco ON – Indicates that port 2 (Cisco interface interface 1) set 1) is set to 16 Mbps. to 16 Mbps OFF – Indicates that port 2 (Cisco interface 1) is set to 4 Mbps or is not initialized. 16 MBPS C Port 3(Cisco ON – Indicates that port 3 (Cisco interface interface 2) set 2) is set to 16 Mbps. to 16 Mbps OFF – Indicates that port 3 (Cisco interface 2) is set to 4 Mbps or is not initialized. 16 MBPS D Port 4 (Cisco ON – Indicates that port 4 (Cisco interface interface 3) set 3) is set to 16 Mbps. to 16 Mbps OFF – Indicates that port 4 (Cisco interface 3) is set to 4 Mbps or is not initialized. RING A IN Port 1 (Cisco ON – Indicates that port 1 (Cisco interface interface 0) in 0) is connected or connecting to its assigned Ring backplane network, or is set to isolated mode. OFF – Indicates that port 1(Cisco interface 0) is not connected to its assigned backplane network. RING B IN Port 2 (Cisco ON – Indicates that port 2 (Cisco interface interface 1) in 1) is connected or connecting to its assigned Ring backplane network, or is set to isolated mode. OFF – Indicates that port 2 (Cisco interface 1) is not connected to its assigned backplane network.
  48. 48. Monitoring Router Module LEDs 4-5 Table 4-1 Front Panel LED Definitions (continued) LED Description Definition RING C IN Port 3 (Cisco ON – Indicates that port 3 (Cisco interface interface 2) in 2) is connected or connecting to its assigned Ring backplane network, or is set to isolated mode. OFF – Indicates that port 3 (Cisco interface 2) is not connected to its assigned backplane network. RING D IN Port 4 (Cisco ON – Indicates that port 4 (Cisco interface interface 3) in 3) is connected or connecting to its assigned Ring backplane network, or is set to isolated mode. OFF – Indicates that port 4 (Cisco interface 3) is not connected to its assigned backplane network.
  49. 49. 4-6 CHAPTER 4: MONITORING OPERATION FDDI NIM LEDs In addition to the common front panel LEDs, the three FDDI router module models also have the LEDs shown in Figure 4-2: PHY-A RING OP PHY-B RING OP FDDI MM, DAS FDDI MM, SAS FDDI SM, DAS Router Module Router Module Router Module Figure 4-2 FDDI NIM LEDs The PHY-A RING OP LED lights when the router module PHY-A attachment is connected in the FDDI A ring. The PHY-B RING OP LED (Dual-Attachment FDDI NIMs only) lights when the PHY-B attachment is connected in the FDDI B ring.
  50. 50. Monitoring Router Module LEDs 4-7 Quad Serial NIM The Quad Serial NIM router module model includes the additional LEDs LEDs shown in Figure 4-3. P-3 LP CN TD TC RD RC P-2 LP CN TD TC RD RC P-1 LP CN TD TC RD RC P-0 LP CN TD TC RD RC Figure 4-3 Quad Serial NIM LEDs
  51. 51. 4-8 CHAPTER 4: MONITORING OPERATION Table 4-2 describes the Quad Serial NIM LEDs. Table 4-2 Quad Serial NIM LED Definitions LED Description Definition LP Looped ON – Indicates that the port is set to a loopback state. OFF – Indicates that the port is set to normal mode. CN Connected ON – Indicates that the port is in ready-state (DSR, DTR, DCD, RTS, CTS signals) to exchange data. OFF – Indicates that the port is not in ready-state to exchange data. TD Transmitted Data ON – Indicates that data is being transmitted over the serial link from the DTE device. The router module port can be set to operate as DTE or DCE. OFF – Indicates that data is not being transmitted by the DTE device. TC Transmitted Clock The clock supplied by the DCE device to synchronize transmitted data. RD Received Data ON – Indicates that data is being received over the serial link by the DCE device. Each router module port can be set to operate as DTE or DCE. OFF – Indicates that data is not being received by the DCE device. RC Received Clock The clock supplied by the DCE device to synchronize received data.
  52. 52. Monitoring Router Module LEDs 4-9 ATM NIM LEDs The ATM MM and ATM SM router modules include the additional LEDs shown in Figure 4-4. Figure 4-4 ATM NIM LEDs
  53. 53. 4-10 CHAPTER 4: MONITORING OPERATION Table 4-3 describes the ATM NIM LEDs. Table 4-3 ATM NIM LED Definitions LED Description Definition Busy ATM NIM Busy ON – Indicates that the NIM is not available to receive data cells. OFF – Indicates that the NIM is available for data cells. Ready ATM NIM Ready ON – Indicates that the NIM is ready to receive data cells. OFF – Indicates that the NIM is not ready to receive ATM cells. RX Cells Received Cells ON – Indicates that the ATM NIM is receiving a a data cell. This LED flickers during normal operation. OFF – Indicates that the ATM NIM is not receiving a data cell. Rx Alarm Receive Alarm ON – Indicates that the receive signal is lost or that a remote alarm has been received by the ATM NIM. OFF – Indicates that the receive signal is not lost and that a remote alarm has not been received. Displaying the To display information about router module configuration and status, Router Module use the following DMM commands. Configuration s SHOW MODULE s SHOW MODULE VERBOSE s SHOW PORT s SHOW PORT VERBOSE
  54. 54. Displaying the Router Module Configuration 4-11 Using the SHOW Use the SHOW MODULE command to display summary information MODULE Command about the router module: CB5000> show module 7.1 This command displays the summary information shown in Figure 4-5. Slot Module Version Network General Information ----- --------------- ------- ------------- ------------------- 07.01 6704R-TCS v1.00.0 PER_PORT Module up Figure 4-5 SHOW MODULE Command Information Using the SHOW Use the SHOW MODULE VERBOSE command to display detailed MODULE VERBOSE information about the router module: Command CB5000> show module 7.1 verbose This command displays the detailed information shown in Figure 4-6. Slot Module Version Network General Information ----- --------------- ------- ------------- ------------------- 07.01 6704R-TCS v1.00.0 PER_PORT Module up 6704R-TCS: CB5000 Token Ring Backbone Router Module Boot Version: v1.00 Native Software Version: 10.30 Native Boot Software Version: v5.20 Number Simple Ports: 1 Network Interface Module Type: FDDI-SINGLE-MODE-DUAL-ATTA Figure 4-6 SHOW MODULE VERBOSE Command Information Using the SHOW Use the SHOW PORT command to display summary information about PORT Command any of the four router module ports: CB5000> show port 7.2
  55. 55. 4-12 CHAPTER 4: MONITORING OPERATION This command displays the summary information shown in Figure 4-7. Port Mode Status Network General Information ----- -------- ------------------- ---------------- --------------------- 07.02 LOGICAL OKAY TOKEN_RING_2 Figure 4-7 SHOW PORT Command Information Using the SHOW Use the SHOW PORT VERBOSE command to display detailed PORT VERBOSE information about any one of the four router module ports: Command CB5000> show port 7.2 verbose This command displays the detailed information shown in Figure 4-8. Port Display for Module 6704R-TCS : Port Mode Status Network General Information ----- -------- ------------------- ---------------- ---------------------- 07.02 LOGICAL OKAY TOKEN_RING_2 Port Connector: BACKPLANE IP Address: 151.104.12.1 Subnetwork Mask: ff.ff.00.00 Default Gateway: 0.0.0.0 Station Address: 08-00-8f-00-00-01 Speed: 16 MBPS Figure 4-8 SHOW PORT VERBOSE Command Information The Speed field in Figure 4-8 identifies the speed for the Cisco interface that corresponds to the 3Com port.

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