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Networking for Professional Development
Definition of Networking – noun   1.  a supportive system of sharing information and services among individuals and groups...
Networking Involves: <ul><li>Establishing goals. </li></ul><ul><li>Analyzing the type of assistance you will need to achie...
Networking  Facts : <ul><li>People love to give advice </li></ul><ul><li>People like being thought of as “experts” </li></...
The Law of 250  <ul><li>Every person knows at least 250 other people. </li></ul><ul><li>Each of your contacts knows at lea...
4 Layers of Separation Level 1 Contact Level 2 Contact Level 3 Contact Level 4 Contact Your Friend Alice Alice’s Uncle Bil...
Corollary to Law of 250 <ul><li>It is typically not your first level contact that eventually hires you - in fact, you’ll p...
Potential “Level 1” Contacts <ul><li>Family/Friends </li></ul><ul><li>Friends of Family/Neighbors </li></ul><ul><li>Classm...
First  Steps ! <ul><li>Assess your own interests, skills, knowledge areas, and personal attributes. Take stock so you can ...
What NOT  To Do : <ul><li>Do not ask for a job or internship (ask for advice, information, and other contacts). </li></ul>...
Keep in  Mind : <ul><li>The same obligations and courtesies that come with traditional face-to-face networking apply to on...
Making the Initial Contact <ul><li>Level 1 Contacts : Call, e-mail or write a letter. </li></ul><ul><li>Level 2, 3, etc. C...
Networking  (E-mail or Letter) <ul><li>Your letter should include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A brief introduction and your aff...
Networking Telephone Call <ul><li>Tell them who you are, why you are calling & what you need. Always ask if this is a conv...
<ul><li>Ask them: </li></ul><ul><li>To be part of your personal NETWORK. </li></ul><ul><li>For advice & input. </li></ul><...
Act  Professionally ! <ul><li>Be polite, respectful, and charming! </li></ul><ul><li>Dress professionally for in-person me...
Follow Up  After  the Interaction <ul><li>Take notes after your interactions.  They may be helpful to refer to when reflec...
Follow Up  A fter the  Interaction <ul><li>If your contact refers you to others, follow-up with them. Make sure to immedia...
Networking Tips  & Techniques
Develop Good People Skills <ul><li>Assert yourself positively and confidently. </li></ul><ul><li>Ask good questions. </li>...
Areas for Common Mistakes <ul><li>Voicemail / Answering Machine – have a professional voicemail message. </li></ul><ul><li...
Networking Business Card <ul><li>Your Name </li></ul><ul><li>Description of Target Career Interest </li></ul><ul><li>Home ...
<ul><li>Use a spreadsheet or notebook to keep track of contacts and what you discussed: </li></ul>Networking Log <ul><li>C...
Keep Your Network Going <ul><li>Don’t let your “rolodex” gather dust – keep in touch through sending occasional emails, up...
<ul><li>“ Remember, part of networking is giving to other people.  The best networkers know that networking is much more t...
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The Networking Survival Guide by Diane Darling

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The Networking Survival Guide by Diane Darling

  1. 1. Networking for Professional Development
  2. 2. Definition of Networking – noun 1. a supportive system of sharing information and services among individuals and groups having a common interest. “ Networking is making links from people we know to people they know, in an organized way, for a specific purpose, while remaining committed to doing our part, expecting nothing in return.” Donna Fisher and Sandy Vilas, Power Networking
  3. 3. Networking Involves: <ul><li>Establishing goals. </li></ul><ul><li>Analyzing the type of assistance you will need to achieve your goals. </li></ul><ul><li>Developing your people skills. </li></ul><ul><li>Building and cultivating your network. </li></ul><ul><li>Maintaining your network through the years. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Networking Facts : <ul><li>People love to give advice </li></ul><ul><li>People like being thought of as “experts” </li></ul><ul><li>Networking is not just asking for help, but agreeing to be helpful in return. </li></ul><ul><li>75% of people get their jobs through networking. </li></ul><ul><li>Many positions are filled before they are even posted! </li></ul><ul><li>People like to be “heroes” </li></ul>
  5. 5. The Law of 250 <ul><li>Every person knows at least 250 other people. </li></ul><ul><li>Each of your contacts knows at least 250 people. So that’s 62,500 at your 2nd level. </li></ul><ul><li>Each of your 2nd level contacts knows 250 people - and that’s over 15,000,000! </li></ul>
  6. 6. 4 Layers of Separation Level 1 Contact Level 2 Contact Level 3 Contact Level 4 Contact Your Friend Alice Alice’s Uncle Bill Bill’s Friend Carol Carol’s Boss David You
  7. 7. Corollary to Law of 250 <ul><li>It is typically not your first level contact that eventually hires you - in fact, you’ll probably find that the hiring contact may be 2, 3 or 4 levels deep. </li></ul><ul><li>Some sociologists have found that “acquaintances are more likely than family members to give individuals direct information and to recommend them for opportunities.” </li></ul><ul><li>Mark Granovetter, “The Strength of Weak Ties” </li></ul>
  8. 8. Potential “Level 1” Contacts <ul><li>Family/Friends </li></ul><ul><li>Friends of Family/Neighbors </li></ul><ul><li>Classmates/Alumni </li></ul><ul><li>Contacts from Special Interest Groups (e.g., Sorority, Fraternity, Student organizations) </li></ul><ul><li>Members of your religious congregation </li></ul><ul><li>People dependant upon networking (e.g., realtors, insurance agents) </li></ul><ul><li>Former employers/co-workers </li></ul><ul><li>Recruiters/employers who give presentations on campus. </li></ul><ul><li>Other job candidates </li></ul><ul><li>LUC Alumni Sharing Knowledge (LUC-ASK) </li></ul><ul><li>Professional Associations </li></ul><ul><li>Contacts in the Career Center </li></ul><ul><li>Former teachers, current professors and staff </li></ul>
  9. 9. First Steps ! <ul><li>Assess your own interests, skills, knowledge areas, and personal attributes. Take stock so you can speak about yourself with enthusiasm. </li></ul><ul><li>Research information about your potential network contact and his/her field. </li></ul><ul><li>Decide what information you would like to obtain from your contact and prepare a list of questions you would like to have answered (see “Guide to Informational Interviewing” for sample questions). </li></ul><ul><li>Remember that you are representing yourself and Loyola as a whole. </li></ul>
  10. 10. What NOT To Do : <ul><li>Do not ask for a job or internship (ask for advice, information, and other contacts). </li></ul><ul><li>Do not spam with multiple e-mails or stalk with multiple phone calls. </li></ul><ul><li>Do not act unprofessionally or negatively. </li></ul><ul><li>Do not ask your contact to mass distribute your resume. </li></ul><ul><li>Do not share their contact information with others unless you have permission to do so. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Keep in Mind : <ul><li>The same obligations and courtesies that come with traditional face-to-face networking apply to online interactions. Treat people the way you’d like to be treated, both online and offline! </li></ul><ul><li>Career-related online networking should eventually lead to other forms of contact like phone conversations or in-person meetings. </li></ul><ul><li>Keep an eye out for alumni and student networking receptions which are also a great way to meet with alumni. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Making the Initial Contact <ul><li>Level 1 Contacts : Call, e-mail or write a letter. </li></ul><ul><li>Level 2, 3, etc. Contacts: Send an “Approach” letter followed by a phone call. </li></ul><ul><li>ATTACH YOUR RESUME AND INDICATE THAT IT’S ONLY FOR REFERENCE! </li></ul>Purpose : Set up a meeting to discuss your needs, interests and goals.
  13. 13. Networking (E-mail or Letter) <ul><li>Your letter should include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A brief introduction and your affiliation with Loyola </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Why you are writing to this individual; why you are interested in this field or organization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A brief statement of your interests and/or experience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>That you would like to schedule a 15-30 minute meeting with them over the phone or in person </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>That you are asking for information and advice. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Information about arrangements for the meeting or call with suggested dates, times and locations. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Proofread all of your correspondence and be professional in your tone. Even if this is already an “acquaintance” you should be formal and professional with them. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Networking Telephone Call <ul><li>Tell them who you are, why you are calling & what you need. Always ask if this is a convenient time to talk. </li></ul><ul><li>Tell them you don’t expect an immediate answer - ask if you can call them back at a later date. </li></ul>
  15. 15. <ul><li>Ask them: </li></ul><ul><li>To be part of your personal NETWORK. </li></ul><ul><li>For advice & input. </li></ul><ul><li>To recommend their tips for getting a foot in the door in this particular field or industry. </li></ul><ul><li>To refer you to others who might be able to assist and give advice (ONLY if you are comfortable asking). </li></ul>Tell Your Contact What You Need
  16. 16. Act Professionally ! <ul><li>Be polite, respectful, and charming! </li></ul><ul><li>Dress professionally for in-person meetings. </li></ul><ul><li>Have 10-15 appropriate questions ready to ask for a half hour conversation, (see Networking Guidelines for examples of informational interview questions). </li></ul><ul><li>Be prepared for the person to ask you about your interests and experiences. </li></ul><ul><li>Be respectful of the person’s time and keep the conversation short; they will let you know if they have additional time to share. </li></ul><ul><li>Say “Thank You” at the conclusion of your conversation! </li></ul>
  17. 17. Follow Up After the Interaction <ul><li>Take notes after your interactions. They may be helpful to refer to when reflecting on your conversation and conducting follow-up. </li></ul><ul><li>Send a thank you note within 24-48 hours –either by email or handwritten. Include “How can I help you in return?” </li></ul><ul><li>Ask yourself: What did I learn from my conversation? How does what I learned fit with my own interests, abilities, goals, and values? What additional information would be helpful to know? </li></ul>
  18. 18. Follow Up A fter the Interaction <ul><li>If your contact refers you to others, follow-up with them. Make sure to immediately mention your mutual contact and why they thought this new person might be helpful. </li></ul><ul><li>Keep your contacts informed. If your original contact referred you to someone who was helpful, share that with her/him. Likewise, if a particular resource or research avenue was fruitful, let the person know. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Networking Tips & Techniques
  20. 20. Develop Good People Skills <ul><li>Assert yourself positively and confidently. </li></ul><ul><li>Ask good questions. </li></ul><ul><li>Be a good listener. </li></ul><ul><li>Be viewed as knowledgeable or skillful in a particular area. </li></ul><ul><li>Show interest in being of assistance to others. </li></ul>
  21. 21. Areas for Common Mistakes <ul><li>Voicemail / Answering Machine – have a professional voicemail message. </li></ul><ul><li>Social Networking websites – Keep your profile professional. Many people can access your information, even if your privacy settings are set to the maximum! </li></ul><ul><li>Email address – again, keep it professional! Do not use something like “cutygirl89@hotmail” or “johnny420@yahoo”—those will not make good impressions. </li></ul>
  22. 22. Networking Business Card <ul><li>Your Name </li></ul><ul><li>Description of Target Career Interest </li></ul><ul><li>Home Address </li></ul><ul><li>City, State Zip </li></ul><ul><li>Phone E-Mail Address </li></ul><ul><li>URL (optional) </li></ul><ul><li>A business card creates an impression of professionalism and quickly provides your contact information. </li></ul><ul><li>Business cards can be created online or at any printing/copy store. </li></ul>
  23. 23. <ul><li>Use a spreadsheet or notebook to keep track of contacts and what you discussed: </li></ul>Networking Log <ul><li>Contact name, title, company </li></ul><ul><li>Address, Phone # & E-Mail address </li></ul><ul><li>How you met contact </li></ul><ul><li>Date last contacted </li></ul><ul><li>Conversation summary </li></ul><ul><li>Names of referrals </li></ul><ul><li>Date of thank-you note for referrals </li></ul><ul><li>Other follow up steps you took </li></ul>
  24. 24. Keep Your Network Going <ul><li>Don’t let your “rolodex” gather dust – keep in touch through sending occasional emails, updates, links to articles, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Keep your contacts up-to-date on your progress. </li></ul><ul><li>Always thank people! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>DON’T STOP NETWORKING ONCE YOU GET A JOB! </li></ul></ul>
  25. 25. <ul><li>“ Remember, part of networking is giving to other people. The best networkers know that networking is much more than passing around resumes. It involves building relationships over time...” </li></ul><ul><li>Jack Chapman, “Build Your Network, Now !” </li></ul>Final Thoughts…

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